3 Tips To Celebrate Rosh Hashanah

3 Tips To Celebrate Rosh Hashanah

It is about religion, tradition and the joining of two families. Mercury, well established in his retrograde direction, will be channeling Neptune. The closest I get to “Yom”ing is when I “ohmmm” in my yoga class.
Rosh Hashanah is a special time, a time of change, time for new beginnings. It is the start of the Jewish new year and is a period of reflection on the past year; how can we pursue our dreams and goals in the coming year? To celebrate this renewing time of change we gather together with friends, family and loved ones not only to reflect but to celebrate the sweetness of life. If you’re hosting this year’s Roash Hashana dinner be prepared to make this most special of holidays truly memorable.

Note well the words “I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you.” Certainly Paul had been instructed on the proper wording by the Twelve after his conversion on the Damascus road. But Paul’s words also reflect his direct ordination as an apostle and bishop by Christ Himself. The four New Testament renderings of the Words of Institution differ slightly from each other, but not in any essentials. All four use the same Greek words to make crystal-clear that the consecrated bread and wine ARE Jesus’ body and blood. Just as the Old Covenant was ratified by the blood of animal sacrifices, so the New Covenant is ratified with Jesus’ once-for-all Sacrifice on Calvary. Christ does not “die again” on the altar. The priest “re-presents” that very same single sacrifice every time we celebrate Mass.

Yom Kippur (September 28, this year) is when Jewish people celebrate the Day of Atonement. It is fitting to continue with the “Happy New Year” or “Shana Tova” greeting all the way through Yom Kippur as this whole period is considered the start of the new year. You could also wish your Jewish friends a “Good Signing” (in the Book of Life) or the Hebrew equivalent “Hatima Tova,” but it is more apprpriate to use that only for greeting the more orthodox of your Jewish friends. They are the ones most likely to use such a greeting. Given Yom Kippur is a fast day, you could also wish your Jewish friends an “Easy Fast” or the Hebrew equivalent “Tzom Kal.” Gifts are not given for Yom Kippur.

While there are few limits to what you can eat, some people also eat leeks, dates, beets, black eyed beans, spinach, the head of a sheep, squash, and gourds. These foods are eaten for some of the same reasons pomegranates, honey, and fish are consumed. These select foods are symbolic of G-d’s protection of his people and a Jews desire to lead endeavors and be blessed by G-d.

The Jewish New Year holiday, Rosh Hashanah, is a two day holiday when Jews celebrate this happy occasion, but also they are very solemn. They are solemn due to the fact they are in repentance, but happy that God is merciful and good. During this two day holiday many Jews will have lengthy prayer services followed by a festive holiday meal. Now you may need some ideas what kinds of recipes will be great to have during your Rosh Hashanah dinner and I would like to share a couple of mine with you.

Now I am about as Jewish as my dog. I’m a bad Jew. I can’t tell you what the Rosh in Rosh Hashanah is, or exactly what the Yom is in front of the Kapur. The closest I get to “Yom”ing is when I “ohmmm” in my yoga class.

The Toldot Yaakov Yosef lived in the mid 1700’s. He was one of the foremost disciples of the Ba’al Shem Tov, the founder of the Chassidic movement. His version of this tradition is as follows.

Rosh Hashanah is more than about food, but the symbolism of the High Holy Day. While called the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah is actually a day of remembrance and judgment. Jewish people around the world celebrate this day with great food and hope for the coming year.

It is about religion, tradition and the joining of two families. Mercury, well established in his retrograde direction, will be channeling Neptune. The closest I get to “Yom”ing is when I “ohmmm” in my yoga class.
Rosh Hashanah is a special time, a time of change, time for new beginnings. It is the start of the Jewish new year and is a period of reflection on the past year; how can we pursue our dreams and goals in the coming year? To celebrate this renewing time of change we gather together with friends, family and loved ones not only to reflect but to celebrate the sweetness of life. If you’re hosting this year’s Roash Hashana dinner be prepared to make this most special of holidays truly memorable.

Note well the words “I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you.” Certainly Paul had been instructed on the proper wording by the Twelve after his conversion on the Damascus road. But Paul’s words also reflect his direct ordination as an apostle and bishop by Christ Himself. The four New Testament renderings of the Words of Institution differ slightly from each other, but not in any essentials. All four use the same Greek words to make crystal-clear that the consecrated bread and wine ARE Jesus’ body and blood. Just as the Old Covenant was ratified by the blood of animal sacrifices, so the New Covenant is ratified with Jesus’ once-for-all Sacrifice on Calvary. Christ does not “die again” on the altar. The priest “re-presents” that very same single sacrifice every time we celebrate Mass.

Yom Kippur (September 28, this year) is when Jewish people celebrate the Day of Atonement. It is fitting to continue with the “Happy New Year” or “Shana Tova” greeting all the way through Yom Kippur as this whole period is considered the start of the new year. You could also wish your Jewish friends a “Good Signing” (in the Book of Life) or the Hebrew equivalent “Hatima Tova,” but it is more apprpriate to use that only for greeting the more orthodox of your Jewish friends. They are the ones most likely to use such a greeting. Given Yom Kippur is a fast day, you could also wish your Jewish friends an “Easy Fast” or the Hebrew equivalent “Tzom Kal.” Gifts are not given for Yom Kippur.

While there are few limits to what you can eat, some people also eat leeks, dates, beets, black eyed beans, spinach, the head of a sheep, squash, and gourds. These foods are eaten for some of the same reasons pomegranates, honey, and fish are consumed. These select foods are symbolic of G-d’s protection of his people and a Jews desire to lead endeavors and be blessed by G-d.

The Jewish New Year holiday, Rosh Hashanah, is a two day holiday when Jews celebrate this happy occasion, but also they are very solemn. They are solemn due to the fact they are in repentance, but happy that God is merciful and good. During this two day holiday many Jews will have lengthy prayer services followed by a festive holiday meal. Now you may need some ideas what kinds of recipes will be great to have during your Rosh Hashanah dinner and I would like to share a couple of mine with you.

Now I am about as Jewish as my dog. I’m a bad Jew. I can’t tell you what the Rosh in Rosh Hashanah is, or exactly what the Yom is in front of the Kapur. The closest I get to “Yom”ing is when I “ohmmm” in my yoga class.

The Toldot Yaakov Yosef lived in the mid 1700’s. He was one of the foremost disciples of the Ba’al Shem Tov, the founder of the Chassidic movement. His version of this tradition is as follows.

Rosh Hashanah is more than about food, but the symbolism of the High Holy Day. While called the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah is actually a day of remembrance and judgment. Jewish people around the world celebrate this day with great food and hope for the coming year.

3 Tips To Celebrate Rosh Hashanah

3 Tips To Celebrate Rosh Hashanah

It is about religion, tradition and the joining of two families. Mercury, well established in his retrograde direction, will be channeling Neptune. The closest I get to “Yom”ing is when I “ohmmm” in my yoga class.
Rosh Hashanah is a special time, a time of change, time for new beginnings. It is the start of the Jewish new year and is a period of reflection on the past year; how can we pursue our dreams and goals in the coming year? To celebrate this renewing time of change we gather together with friends, family and loved ones not only to reflect but to celebrate the sweetness of life. If you’re hosting this year’s Roash Hashana dinner be prepared to make this most special of holidays truly memorable.

Note well the words “I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you.” Certainly Paul had been instructed on the proper wording by the Twelve after his conversion on the Damascus road. But Paul’s words also reflect his direct ordination as an apostle and bishop by Christ Himself. The four New Testament renderings of the Words of Institution differ slightly from each other, but not in any essentials. All four use the same Greek words to make crystal-clear that the consecrated bread and wine ARE Jesus’ body and blood. Just as the Old Covenant was ratified by the blood of animal sacrifices, so the New Covenant is ratified with Jesus’ once-for-all Sacrifice on Calvary. Christ does not “die again” on the altar. The priest “re-presents” that very same single sacrifice every time we celebrate Mass.

Yom Kippur (September 28, this year) is when Jewish people celebrate the Day of Atonement. It is fitting to continue with the “Happy New Year” or “Shana Tova” greeting all the way through Yom Kippur as this whole period is considered the start of the new year. You could also wish your Jewish friends a “Good Signing” (in the Book of Life) or the Hebrew equivalent “Hatima Tova,” but it is more apprpriate to use that only for greeting the more orthodox of your Jewish friends. They are the ones most likely to use such a greeting. Given Yom Kippur is a fast day, you could also wish your Jewish friends an “Easy Fast” or the Hebrew equivalent “Tzom Kal.” Gifts are not given for Yom Kippur.

While there are few limits to what you can eat, some people also eat leeks, dates, beets, black eyed beans, spinach, the head of a sheep, squash, and gourds. These foods are eaten for some of the same reasons pomegranates, honey, and fish are consumed. These select foods are symbolic of G-d’s protection of his people and a Jews desire to lead endeavors and be blessed by G-d.

The Jewish New Year holiday, Rosh Hashanah, is a two day holiday when Jews celebrate this happy occasion, but also they are very solemn. They are solemn due to the fact they are in repentance, but happy that God is merciful and good. During this two day holiday many Jews will have lengthy prayer services followed by a festive holiday meal. Now you may need some ideas what kinds of recipes will be great to have during your Rosh Hashanah dinner and I would like to share a couple of mine with you.

Now I am about as Jewish as my dog. I’m a bad Jew. I can’t tell you what the Rosh in Rosh Hashanah is, or exactly what the Yom is in front of the Kapur. The closest I get to “Yom”ing is when I “ohmmm” in my yoga class.

The Toldot Yaakov Yosef lived in the mid 1700’s. He was one of the foremost disciples of the Ba’al Shem Tov, the founder of the Chassidic movement. His version of this tradition is as follows.

Rosh Hashanah is more than about food, but the symbolism of the High Holy Day. While called the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah is actually a day of remembrance and judgment. Jewish people around the world celebrate this day with great food and hope for the coming year.

It is about religion, tradition and the joining of two families. Mercury, well established in his retrograde direction, will be channeling Neptune. The closest I get to “Yom”ing is when I “ohmmm” in my yoga class.
Rosh Hashanah is a special time, a time of change, time for new beginnings. It is the start of the Jewish new year and is a period of reflection on the past year; how can we pursue our dreams and goals in the coming year? To celebrate this renewing time of change we gather together with friends, family and loved ones not only to reflect but to celebrate the sweetness of life. If you’re hosting this year’s Roash Hashana dinner be prepared to make this most special of holidays truly memorable.

Note well the words “I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you.” Certainly Paul had been instructed on the proper wording by the Twelve after his conversion on the Damascus road. But Paul’s words also reflect his direct ordination as an apostle and bishop by Christ Himself. The four New Testament renderings of the Words of Institution differ slightly from each other, but not in any essentials. All four use the same Greek words to make crystal-clear that the consecrated bread and wine ARE Jesus’ body and blood. Just as the Old Covenant was ratified by the blood of animal sacrifices, so the New Covenant is ratified with Jesus’ once-for-all Sacrifice on Calvary. Christ does not “die again” on the altar. The priest “re-presents” that very same single sacrifice every time we celebrate Mass.

Yom Kippur (September 28, this year) is when Jewish people celebrate the Day of Atonement. It is fitting to continue with the “Happy New Year” or “Shana Tova” greeting all the way through Yom Kippur as this whole period is considered the start of the new year. You could also wish your Jewish friends a “Good Signing” (in the Book of Life) or the Hebrew equivalent “Hatima Tova,” but it is more apprpriate to use that only for greeting the more orthodox of your Jewish friends. They are the ones most likely to use such a greeting. Given Yom Kippur is a fast day, you could also wish your Jewish friends an “Easy Fast” or the Hebrew equivalent “Tzom Kal.” Gifts are not given for Yom Kippur.

While there are few limits to what you can eat, some people also eat leeks, dates, beets, black eyed beans, spinach, the head of a sheep, squash, and gourds. These foods are eaten for some of the same reasons pomegranates, honey, and fish are consumed. These select foods are symbolic of G-d’s protection of his people and a Jews desire to lead endeavors and be blessed by G-d.

The Jewish New Year holiday, Rosh Hashanah, is a two day holiday when Jews celebrate this happy occasion, but also they are very solemn. They are solemn due to the fact they are in repentance, but happy that God is merciful and good. During this two day holiday many Jews will have lengthy prayer services followed by a festive holiday meal. Now you may need some ideas what kinds of recipes will be great to have during your Rosh Hashanah dinner and I would like to share a couple of mine with you.

Now I am about as Jewish as my dog. I’m a bad Jew. I can’t tell you what the Rosh in Rosh Hashanah is, or exactly what the Yom is in front of the Kapur. The closest I get to “Yom”ing is when I “ohmmm” in my yoga class.

The Toldot Yaakov Yosef lived in the mid 1700’s. He was one of the foremost disciples of the Ba’al Shem Tov, the founder of the Chassidic movement. His version of this tradition is as follows.

Rosh Hashanah is more than about food, but the symbolism of the High Holy Day. While called the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah is actually a day of remembrance and judgment. Jewish people around the world celebrate this day with great food and hope for the coming year.