3 Tips To Celebrate Rosh Hashanah

3 Tips To Celebrate Rosh Hashanah

It is also said that this fruit contains 613 seeds, just as there are 613 mitzvot (commandments). After the fish is placed on the table, the common prayer asking that the family be more like leaders than followers is made.
The start of Passover is just a few weeks away. If you are planning on observing this holiday, but don’t feel like cooking, you may want to consider stopping by Glenview House in suburban Glenview. Chef Grant Slauterbeck has put together a tasting menu of traditional Seder foods that promises to please any palate.

What my friend told me made me say to myself that I don’t have to be Jewish to celebrate the cleansing of my soul. I went home that night and asked my parents about what they felt and thought of me. I told them the same. What we found out about each other changed our views in my family so dramatically that we took our own long walk down to the river and cast aside bread. With each throw of our bread we told each other what we were sad about and what we asked forgiveness for.

We’ve spent a few weeks preparing for Rosh Hashanah, Judging our Dreams, Mastering the Exit, excited for our Grand Entrance. We have carefully examined our lives and promised to improve. We are planning for the coming year, but, as this week’s portion, “Nitzavim,” “Standers,” reminds us, in one week we too will have our big moment; we will stand before the King. We will have an opportunity to argue our case, to plead, promise, praise, and repent. We have climbed our way out of the past, prepared for our entrance into the New Year, but there is one moment that defines our future: The moment we stand before God. How will we stand?

What is important is the person inside. Religion is something you either relate to or you don’t. So if you’re not religious and you are over thirty, it’s time to dig down deep and look inside yourself. Stop not dating people because your mother doesn’t want you to date them.

For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, “This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” In the same way also the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.” For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.

When the Romans invaded England, they found the Druids celebrating New Year’s Day on March 10. The pagan priest would cut off branches of mistletoe on this day and carefully allow them to fall onto a sacred blanket. The branches would then be distributed among the Celtic people to be used as magical charms and for protection against evil spirits.

You don’t need to wait till September 18 to begin using this greeting since, like the non-Jewish person uses “Happy New Year” from a few days before, so does the Jew. So, if you run into friends who greet you with “Shana Tova,” smile and greet them the same way, right back. If you wish to use a greeting more specific to the Day of Atonement you can wait to begin using that till after September 19 though the rule is never hard and fast. And remember, as you do, that you are following a tradition which was followed by the Lord Jesus Christ, himself.

It is also said that this fruit contains 613 seeds, just as there are 613 mitzvot (commandments). After the fish is placed on the table, the common prayer asking that the family be more like leaders than followers is made.
The start of Passover is just a few weeks away. If you are planning on observing this holiday, but don’t feel like cooking, you may want to consider stopping by Glenview House in suburban Glenview. Chef Grant Slauterbeck has put together a tasting menu of traditional Seder foods that promises to please any palate.

What my friend told me made me say to myself that I don’t have to be Jewish to celebrate the cleansing of my soul. I went home that night and asked my parents about what they felt and thought of me. I told them the same. What we found out about each other changed our views in my family so dramatically that we took our own long walk down to the river and cast aside bread. With each throw of our bread we told each other what we were sad about and what we asked forgiveness for.

We’ve spent a few weeks preparing for Rosh Hashanah, Judging our Dreams, Mastering the Exit, excited for our Grand Entrance. We have carefully examined our lives and promised to improve. We are planning for the coming year, but, as this week’s portion, “Nitzavim,” “Standers,” reminds us, in one week we too will have our big moment; we will stand before the King. We will have an opportunity to argue our case, to plead, promise, praise, and repent. We have climbed our way out of the past, prepared for our entrance into the New Year, but there is one moment that defines our future: The moment we stand before God. How will we stand?

What is important is the person inside. Religion is something you either relate to or you don’t. So if you’re not religious and you are over thirty, it’s time to dig down deep and look inside yourself. Stop not dating people because your mother doesn’t want you to date them.

For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, “This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” In the same way also the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.” For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.

When the Romans invaded England, they found the Druids celebrating New Year’s Day on March 10. The pagan priest would cut off branches of mistletoe on this day and carefully allow them to fall onto a sacred blanket. The branches would then be distributed among the Celtic people to be used as magical charms and for protection against evil spirits.

You don’t need to wait till September 18 to begin using this greeting since, like the non-Jewish person uses “Happy New Year” from a few days before, so does the Jew. So, if you run into friends who greet you with “Shana Tova,” smile and greet them the same way, right back. If you wish to use a greeting more specific to the Day of Atonement you can wait to begin using that till after September 19 though the rule is never hard and fast. And remember, as you do, that you are following a tradition which was followed by the Lord Jesus Christ, himself.