A Story For Rosh Hashanah

A Story For Rosh Hashanah

You worry about how you are dressed, the extra pounds you’ve put on and various other assorted silly ideas. An event with many guests will require a well coordinated and thought out array of apples and honey.
Shofar is a traditional, Jewish blowing horn. This horn is usually that of a ram. For ages, this blowing horn has been used in various Jewish rituals and religious ceremonies. Rituals like Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah involves blowing of the shofars. Blowing of the shofars is also widely prevalent in many customs held at synagogues.

The CFDA greatly respects and understands the importance of this holiday but, given the international calendar of European shows directly after New York, we do not have the option to shift the dates later. We realize that the observance of the holiday will impact some in their ability to attend or present shows-but we are asking that everyone please work with us to make this situation work as best as possible.

I’ve dated women who chanted every morning when they got up and prayed to Buddha. I’ve dated women who go to church. Have I gone with them? No. Have I respected them and their belief system? Absolutely!

Peter doesn’t get it. This is “the Christ, the Son of the living God.” Far be it from Him to humbly stoop down before His imperfect disciple and wash his feet! Peter has the right motives, but the wrong understanding. Jesus corrects him: Let Me serve you. You cannot be My disciple otherwise. Why? Because you must be all about emptying yourself and serving others – all the time – as you spread My Good News to all nations.

There are prayers that are read for each day of Rosh Hashanah. On day one, we read Genesis XXI. This part of the book talks about the birth of Isaac to Abraham and Sarah. It is said that Sarah gave birth to Isaac on Rosh Hashanah.

When you think of Rosh Hashanah you think of challah! These round loaves of braided egg bread are one of the most recognizable food symbols of the holiday. During this High Holy Day, challah loaves are shaped into rounds, spirals (ladders) or birds. These shapes are symbolic of the cycle of life, hope that prayers rise to heaven, and the continuity of creation. Depending on preference and family recipes, sweet fruits such as raisins or even honey are added to the loaves to make them extra sweet.

Zara Market has a good variety of Kosher foods imported from Israel. You can try Tehina 100% Sesame $19.00 for 17.63 oz, Marble Halva $14.00 for 14.2 ozs or Carmel King David kiddush and dessert kosher red wine $40.00.

Honey dishes are a very popular gift. They come an a large variety of designs and materials. Judaica designers have in recent years, been inspired to create stylish and contemporary honey dishes which can also be used for other foods the rest of the year.

You worry about how you are dressed, the extra pounds you’ve put on and various other assorted silly ideas. An event with many guests will require a well coordinated and thought out array of apples and honey.
Shofar is a traditional, Jewish blowing horn. This horn is usually that of a ram. For ages, this blowing horn has been used in various Jewish rituals and religious ceremonies. Rituals like Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah involves blowing of the shofars. Blowing of the shofars is also widely prevalent in many customs held at synagogues.

The CFDA greatly respects and understands the importance of this holiday but, given the international calendar of European shows directly after New York, we do not have the option to shift the dates later. We realize that the observance of the holiday will impact some in their ability to attend or present shows-but we are asking that everyone please work with us to make this situation work as best as possible.

I’ve dated women who chanted every morning when they got up and prayed to Buddha. I’ve dated women who go to church. Have I gone with them? No. Have I respected them and their belief system? Absolutely!

Peter doesn’t get it. This is “the Christ, the Son of the living God.” Far be it from Him to humbly stoop down before His imperfect disciple and wash his feet! Peter has the right motives, but the wrong understanding. Jesus corrects him: Let Me serve you. You cannot be My disciple otherwise. Why? Because you must be all about emptying yourself and serving others – all the time – as you spread My Good News to all nations.

There are prayers that are read for each day of Rosh Hashanah. On day one, we read Genesis XXI. This part of the book talks about the birth of Isaac to Abraham and Sarah. It is said that Sarah gave birth to Isaac on Rosh Hashanah.

When you think of Rosh Hashanah you think of challah! These round loaves of braided egg bread are one of the most recognizable food symbols of the holiday. During this High Holy Day, challah loaves are shaped into rounds, spirals (ladders) or birds. These shapes are symbolic of the cycle of life, hope that prayers rise to heaven, and the continuity of creation. Depending on preference and family recipes, sweet fruits such as raisins or even honey are added to the loaves to make them extra sweet.

Zara Market has a good variety of Kosher foods imported from Israel. You can try Tehina 100% Sesame $19.00 for 17.63 oz, Marble Halva $14.00 for 14.2 ozs or Carmel King David kiddush and dessert kosher red wine $40.00.

Honey dishes are a very popular gift. They come an a large variety of designs and materials. Judaica designers have in recent years, been inspired to create stylish and contemporary honey dishes which can also be used for other foods the rest of the year.