Apples, Carrots And Honey Are Important Symbols On Rosh Hashanah

Apples, Carrots And Honey Are Important Symbols On Rosh Hashanah

This fit the timing for the trumpets in Leviticus 23:24-27. And, like all other new years, you want to spread the cheer and the word. That is until the internet came along and brought the stores right to your living room.

Stick to tradition if you haven’t, and break it if you have. Tradition is a very important part of being Jewish, but not everyone is a traditionalist. If you don’t like to conform, you can make your Rosh Hashanah memorable by doing just that. Set the table with a white tablecloth, serve two round loaves of challah to celebrate the new cyclical year, put out proper kiddush cups and do a ceremonial candlelighting. You should certainly serve apples and bits of challah to be dipped in honey, but you should say the traditional prayers before anyone takes a bite.

We may find ourselves in the mood to work hard on special projects on Labor Day, the first day of Ramadan, and most of the first week of September, with the Sun joining the Jupiter-Saturn concord. The Sun is in Virgo, so its time for harvest. We are going to be feeling those instinctive instructions to work hard and reap our crops, and we should find it easy to focus them into our businesses and our homes. It may be time for some Fall housecleaning. I have an article called, “Jupiter Trine Saturn – Ready to Work Hard,” if you would like to read more.

Zara Market has a good variety of Kosher foods imported from Israel. You can try Tehina 100% Sesame $19.00 for 17.63 oz, Marble Halva $14.00 for 14.2 ozs or Carmel King David kiddush and dessert kosher red wine $40.00.

Now I am about as Jewish as my dog. I’m a bad Jew. I can’t tell you what the Rosh in Rosh Hashanah is, or exactly what the Yom is in front of the Kapur. The closest I get to “Yom”ing is when I “ohmmm” in my yoga class.

I have gone through many metamorphoses from the most extreme “I don’t celebrate Christmas” or “Happy Hanukkah to you” to the middle of the road “Thank you and happy holidays to you” to ignoring the slight. That’s how I see it – a slight. A total ignorance that not everyone celebrates the same holidays and that it is rude to put up a Christmas tree on public land without symbols for other religions.

September 18th (beginning at sundown) is Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is a day of rest, but its meals typically feature apples and honey to symbolize a sweet new year. Celebrate with apples, honey, and challah for a sweet start to the new year.

By Saturday, September 6th, we may be experiencing some frustrations, and our energy could be low. Those of us who over did it this past week may find we hit burnout this weekend. There could be some miscommunications and travel problems on Sunday and Monday. Especially Monday, September 8th, with Pluto and Jupiter at direct station on that day. There could also be money and family problems surfacing on Monday and Tuesday.

We can strive to be better and better if we constantly experience the significance of the High Holy Days. That is what God requires and that is what our community desires. We can make a difference in our lives, our families and our community if we truly embrace the essence of the High Holy Days.

This fit the timing for the trumpets in Leviticus 23:24-27. And, like all other new years, you want to spread the cheer and the word. That is until the internet came along and brought the stores right to your living room.

Stick to tradition if you haven’t, and break it if you have. Tradition is a very important part of being Jewish, but not everyone is a traditionalist. If you don’t like to conform, you can make your Rosh Hashanah memorable by doing just that. Set the table with a white tablecloth, serve two round loaves of challah to celebrate the new cyclical year, put out proper kiddush cups and do a ceremonial candlelighting. You should certainly serve apples and bits of challah to be dipped in honey, but you should say the traditional prayers before anyone takes a bite.

We may find ourselves in the mood to work hard on special projects on Labor Day, the first day of Ramadan, and most of the first week of September, with the Sun joining the Jupiter-Saturn concord. The Sun is in Virgo, so its time for harvest. We are going to be feeling those instinctive instructions to work hard and reap our crops, and we should find it easy to focus them into our businesses and our homes. It may be time for some Fall housecleaning. I have an article called, “Jupiter Trine Saturn – Ready to Work Hard,” if you would like to read more.

Zara Market has a good variety of Kosher foods imported from Israel. You can try Tehina 100% Sesame $19.00 for 17.63 oz, Marble Halva $14.00 for 14.2 ozs or Carmel King David kiddush and dessert kosher red wine $40.00.

Now I am about as Jewish as my dog. I’m a bad Jew. I can’t tell you what the Rosh in Rosh Hashanah is, or exactly what the Yom is in front of the Kapur. The closest I get to “Yom”ing is when I “ohmmm” in my yoga class.

I have gone through many metamorphoses from the most extreme “I don’t celebrate Christmas” or “Happy Hanukkah to you” to the middle of the road “Thank you and happy holidays to you” to ignoring the slight. That’s how I see it – a slight. A total ignorance that not everyone celebrates the same holidays and that it is rude to put up a Christmas tree on public land without symbols for other religions.

September 18th (beginning at sundown) is Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is a day of rest, but its meals typically feature apples and honey to symbolize a sweet new year. Celebrate with apples, honey, and challah for a sweet start to the new year.

By Saturday, September 6th, we may be experiencing some frustrations, and our energy could be low. Those of us who over did it this past week may find we hit burnout this weekend. There could be some miscommunications and travel problems on Sunday and Monday. Especially Monday, September 8th, with Pluto and Jupiter at direct station on that day. There could also be money and family problems surfacing on Monday and Tuesday.

We can strive to be better and better if we constantly experience the significance of the High Holy Days. That is what God requires and that is what our community desires. We can make a difference in our lives, our families and our community if we truly embrace the essence of the High Holy Days.