At The Sound Of The Shofar

At The Sound Of The Shofar

On the second night of Rosh Hashanah, its customary to eat a fruit which has recently come into season. The Chinese use the lunar calendar dating back 4,000 years to the waxing and the waning of the moon.
The Day of Atonement, the pinnacle of the High Holy Days, begins on the evening of September 17th and ends on the evening of the 18th. It is the culmination of the Ten Days of Awe.

Marv Owen did not drive in 100 runs like his counterparts, but proved just as tough as Rogell. Despite batting .069 in the World Series, he fought the intimidating Joe Medwick in Game 7. Medwick slid hard into Owen at third precipitating the brawl. Both players remained in the game until Commissioner Landis removed Medwick to protect him from Tiger fans. For the season, Owen hit .317 with eight home runs and 96 RBI.

Akedah- this is the biblical passage recited on Rosh Hashanah that speaks of the story of how God tested Abraham’s faith when he was asked to sacrifice his son Isaac.

One of the retailers you and your Jewish contingency may wish to visit includes Oneg Heimishe Bakery (188 Lee Ave.) for their signature challah loaves. Also, the Satmar Butcher and Meat Market (82 Lee Ave.) is where all the Hasidic Satmar sect go for chicken, beef and lamb. If your dress is not up to snuff, visit Bais Hasefer (75 Lee Ave.), which has kippot and talis to fit any individual; you can also find prayer books and other religious articles there. Finally, when you’re dressed, got your bread, got your meat, now it’s time to get your sweets. Kaff’s Bakery (73 Lee Ave.) just next door to Bais Hasefer is where you can get your honey cakes, strudel and the best chocolate babkas in all of Williamsburg!

When you think of Rosh Hashanah you think of challah! These round loaves of braided egg bread are one of the most recognizable food symbols of the holiday. During this High Holy Day, challah loaves are shaped into rounds, spirals (ladders) or birds. These shapes are symbolic of the cycle of life, hope that prayers rise to heaven, and the continuity of creation. Depending on preference and family recipes, sweet fruits such as raisins or even honey are added to the loaves to make them extra sweet.

The same principles apply to Yemenite kudu horns as well, though these shofars are considerably longer, of course. A 30-inch kudu shofar will cost around $100, while a jumbo kudu shofar, which is typically about 48 inches (yes, that’s right, four feet long) can cost $200 or more.

Rabbi Dan Moskovitz and Jason Mesches wrote the lyrics for “Call Your Zeyde”. Temple Judea clergy and staff make you smile as you watch their antics on this inspiring parody of “Call Me Maybe”. You can find it on YouTube. After watching the video, call your zeyde (grandfather) or any other relative you miss, and wish them a sweet year.

On the second night of Rosh Hashanah, its customary to eat a fruit which has recently come into season. The Chinese use the lunar calendar dating back 4,000 years to the waxing and the waning of the moon.
The Day of Atonement, the pinnacle of the High Holy Days, begins on the evening of September 17th and ends on the evening of the 18th. It is the culmination of the Ten Days of Awe.

Marv Owen did not drive in 100 runs like his counterparts, but proved just as tough as Rogell. Despite batting .069 in the World Series, he fought the intimidating Joe Medwick in Game 7. Medwick slid hard into Owen at third precipitating the brawl. Both players remained in the game until Commissioner Landis removed Medwick to protect him from Tiger fans. For the season, Owen hit .317 with eight home runs and 96 RBI.

Akedah- this is the biblical passage recited on Rosh Hashanah that speaks of the story of how God tested Abraham’s faith when he was asked to sacrifice his son Isaac.

One of the retailers you and your Jewish contingency may wish to visit includes Oneg Heimishe Bakery (188 Lee Ave.) for their signature challah loaves. Also, the Satmar Butcher and Meat Market (82 Lee Ave.) is where all the Hasidic Satmar sect go for chicken, beef and lamb. If your dress is not up to snuff, visit Bais Hasefer (75 Lee Ave.), which has kippot and talis to fit any individual; you can also find prayer books and other religious articles there. Finally, when you’re dressed, got your bread, got your meat, now it’s time to get your sweets. Kaff’s Bakery (73 Lee Ave.) just next door to Bais Hasefer is where you can get your honey cakes, strudel and the best chocolate babkas in all of Williamsburg!

When you think of Rosh Hashanah you think of challah! These round loaves of braided egg bread are one of the most recognizable food symbols of the holiday. During this High Holy Day, challah loaves are shaped into rounds, spirals (ladders) or birds. These shapes are symbolic of the cycle of life, hope that prayers rise to heaven, and the continuity of creation. Depending on preference and family recipes, sweet fruits such as raisins or even honey are added to the loaves to make them extra sweet.

The same principles apply to Yemenite kudu horns as well, though these shofars are considerably longer, of course. A 30-inch kudu shofar will cost around $100, while a jumbo kudu shofar, which is typically about 48 inches (yes, that’s right, four feet long) can cost $200 or more.

Rabbi Dan Moskovitz and Jason Mesches wrote the lyrics for “Call Your Zeyde”. Temple Judea clergy and staff make you smile as you watch their antics on this inspiring parody of “Call Me Maybe”. You can find it on YouTube. After watching the video, call your zeyde (grandfather) or any other relative you miss, and wish them a sweet year.