Dating Advice: Five Ways To Cope With The Holidays

Dating Advice: Five Ways To Cope With The Holidays

Lucky for you, September is chock-full of reasons why you should invite people over. This is done to remove any bad smell that might still surround the horn. Shouldn’t we be helping them do t’shuvah, return to Judaism and to God?
Now the interesting thing is that I always thought that I was alone in my dislike for honey cake, but when I got married, I was pleasantly surprised to find out that my wife also did not care for it. So our Rosh Hashanah cuisine always consisted of traditionally sweet foods but the cake of choice was not honey.

The other day my Labrador Daphne told me she wanted to become a Buddhist dog, as she was already proficient in downward facing dog. So I respected her decision and allowed it, even though my dream was to have a litter of Labrador puppies with yamakas on their heads celebrating Hanukkah with us this December.

You can find a Kosher gift basket here for any holiday and some for just when you want to send a surprise and it is perfectly fine to send one to yourself. There are hundreds to choose from like Diabetic Delicacies for $49.95 or Healthy Cherries Berries & Nuts for $89.95.

The CFDA greatly respects and understands the importance of this holiday but, given the international calendar of European shows directly after New York, we do not have the option to shift the dates later. We realize that the observance of the holiday will impact some in their ability to attend or present shows-but we are asking that everyone please work with us to make this situation work as best as possible.

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is celebrated in late September or early October. The Chinese use the lunar calendar dating back 4,000 years to the waxing and the waning of the moon. Their New Year falls between January 21 and February 19. Hindus celebrate the first day of each season, so they celebrate four times each year.

One of the retailers you and your Jewish contingency may wish to visit includes Oneg Heimishe Bakery (188 Lee Ave.) for their signature challah loaves. Also, the Satmar Butcher and Meat Market (82 Lee Ave.) is where all the Hasidic Satmar sect go for chicken, beef and lamb. If your dress is not up to snuff, visit Bais Hasefer (75 Lee Ave.), which has kippot and talis to fit any individual; you can also find prayer books and other religious articles there. Finally, when you’re dressed, got your bread, got your meat, now it’s time to get your sweets. Kaff’s Bakery (73 Lee Ave.) just next door to Bais Hasefer is where you can get your honey cakes, strudel and the best chocolate babkas in all of Williamsburg!

The shofar has a unique shape that is the result of the natural horn being flatten and heated. Once hollowed, the horn may resemble a streamlined cornucopia or a series of waves. Depending on Jewish school of tradition, Askkenazic or Sephardic, the shofar may or may not have a carved mouthpiece.

Rosh Hashanah is more than about food, but the symbolism of the High Holy Day. While called the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah is actually a day of remembrance and judgment. Jewish people around the world celebrate this day with great food and hope for the coming year.

Lucky for you, September is chock-full of reasons why you should invite people over. This is done to remove any bad smell that might still surround the horn. Shouldn’t we be helping them do t’shuvah, return to Judaism and to God?
Now the interesting thing is that I always thought that I was alone in my dislike for honey cake, but when I got married, I was pleasantly surprised to find out that my wife also did not care for it. So our Rosh Hashanah cuisine always consisted of traditionally sweet foods but the cake of choice was not honey.

The other day my Labrador Daphne told me she wanted to become a Buddhist dog, as she was already proficient in downward facing dog. So I respected her decision and allowed it, even though my dream was to have a litter of Labrador puppies with yamakas on their heads celebrating Hanukkah with us this December.

You can find a Kosher gift basket here for any holiday and some for just when you want to send a surprise and it is perfectly fine to send one to yourself. There are hundreds to choose from like Diabetic Delicacies for $49.95 or Healthy Cherries Berries & Nuts for $89.95.

The CFDA greatly respects and understands the importance of this holiday but, given the international calendar of European shows directly after New York, we do not have the option to shift the dates later. We realize that the observance of the holiday will impact some in their ability to attend or present shows-but we are asking that everyone please work with us to make this situation work as best as possible.

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is celebrated in late September or early October. The Chinese use the lunar calendar dating back 4,000 years to the waxing and the waning of the moon. Their New Year falls between January 21 and February 19. Hindus celebrate the first day of each season, so they celebrate four times each year.

One of the retailers you and your Jewish contingency may wish to visit includes Oneg Heimishe Bakery (188 Lee Ave.) for their signature challah loaves. Also, the Satmar Butcher and Meat Market (82 Lee Ave.) is where all the Hasidic Satmar sect go for chicken, beef and lamb. If your dress is not up to snuff, visit Bais Hasefer (75 Lee Ave.), which has kippot and talis to fit any individual; you can also find prayer books and other religious articles there. Finally, when you’re dressed, got your bread, got your meat, now it’s time to get your sweets. Kaff’s Bakery (73 Lee Ave.) just next door to Bais Hasefer is where you can get your honey cakes, strudel and the best chocolate babkas in all of Williamsburg!

The shofar has a unique shape that is the result of the natural horn being flatten and heated. Once hollowed, the horn may resemble a streamlined cornucopia or a series of waves. Depending on Jewish school of tradition, Askkenazic or Sephardic, the shofar may or may not have a carved mouthpiece.

Rosh Hashanah is more than about food, but the symbolism of the High Holy Day. While called the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah is actually a day of remembrance and judgment. Jewish people around the world celebrate this day with great food and hope for the coming year.

Dating Advice: Five Ways To Cope With The Holidays

Dating Advice: Five Ways To Cope With The Holidays

Lucky for you, September is chock-full of reasons why you should invite people over. This is done to remove any bad smell that might still surround the horn. Shouldn’t we be helping them do t’shuvah, return to Judaism and to God?
Now the interesting thing is that I always thought that I was alone in my dislike for honey cake, but when I got married, I was pleasantly surprised to find out that my wife also did not care for it. So our Rosh Hashanah cuisine always consisted of traditionally sweet foods but the cake of choice was not honey.

The other day my Labrador Daphne told me she wanted to become a Buddhist dog, as she was already proficient in downward facing dog. So I respected her decision and allowed it, even though my dream was to have a litter of Labrador puppies with yamakas on their heads celebrating Hanukkah with us this December.

You can find a Kosher gift basket here for any holiday and some for just when you want to send a surprise and it is perfectly fine to send one to yourself. There are hundreds to choose from like Diabetic Delicacies for $49.95 or Healthy Cherries Berries & Nuts for $89.95.

The CFDA greatly respects and understands the importance of this holiday but, given the international calendar of European shows directly after New York, we do not have the option to shift the dates later. We realize that the observance of the holiday will impact some in their ability to attend or present shows-but we are asking that everyone please work with us to make this situation work as best as possible.

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is celebrated in late September or early October. The Chinese use the lunar calendar dating back 4,000 years to the waxing and the waning of the moon. Their New Year falls between January 21 and February 19. Hindus celebrate the first day of each season, so they celebrate four times each year.

One of the retailers you and your Jewish contingency may wish to visit includes Oneg Heimishe Bakery (188 Lee Ave.) for their signature challah loaves. Also, the Satmar Butcher and Meat Market (82 Lee Ave.) is where all the Hasidic Satmar sect go for chicken, beef and lamb. If your dress is not up to snuff, visit Bais Hasefer (75 Lee Ave.), which has kippot and talis to fit any individual; you can also find prayer books and other religious articles there. Finally, when you’re dressed, got your bread, got your meat, now it’s time to get your sweets. Kaff’s Bakery (73 Lee Ave.) just next door to Bais Hasefer is where you can get your honey cakes, strudel and the best chocolate babkas in all of Williamsburg!

The shofar has a unique shape that is the result of the natural horn being flatten and heated. Once hollowed, the horn may resemble a streamlined cornucopia or a series of waves. Depending on Jewish school of tradition, Askkenazic or Sephardic, the shofar may or may not have a carved mouthpiece.

Rosh Hashanah is more than about food, but the symbolism of the High Holy Day. While called the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah is actually a day of remembrance and judgment. Jewish people around the world celebrate this day with great food and hope for the coming year.

Lucky for you, September is chock-full of reasons why you should invite people over. This is done to remove any bad smell that might still surround the horn. Shouldn’t we be helping them do t’shuvah, return to Judaism and to God?
Now the interesting thing is that I always thought that I was alone in my dislike for honey cake, but when I got married, I was pleasantly surprised to find out that my wife also did not care for it. So our Rosh Hashanah cuisine always consisted of traditionally sweet foods but the cake of choice was not honey.

The other day my Labrador Daphne told me she wanted to become a Buddhist dog, as she was already proficient in downward facing dog. So I respected her decision and allowed it, even though my dream was to have a litter of Labrador puppies with yamakas on their heads celebrating Hanukkah with us this December.

You can find a Kosher gift basket here for any holiday and some for just when you want to send a surprise and it is perfectly fine to send one to yourself. There are hundreds to choose from like Diabetic Delicacies for $49.95 or Healthy Cherries Berries & Nuts for $89.95.

The CFDA greatly respects and understands the importance of this holiday but, given the international calendar of European shows directly after New York, we do not have the option to shift the dates later. We realize that the observance of the holiday will impact some in their ability to attend or present shows-but we are asking that everyone please work with us to make this situation work as best as possible.

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is celebrated in late September or early October. The Chinese use the lunar calendar dating back 4,000 years to the waxing and the waning of the moon. Their New Year falls between January 21 and February 19. Hindus celebrate the first day of each season, so they celebrate four times each year.

One of the retailers you and your Jewish contingency may wish to visit includes Oneg Heimishe Bakery (188 Lee Ave.) for their signature challah loaves. Also, the Satmar Butcher and Meat Market (82 Lee Ave.) is where all the Hasidic Satmar sect go for chicken, beef and lamb. If your dress is not up to snuff, visit Bais Hasefer (75 Lee Ave.), which has kippot and talis to fit any individual; you can also find prayer books and other religious articles there. Finally, when you’re dressed, got your bread, got your meat, now it’s time to get your sweets. Kaff’s Bakery (73 Lee Ave.) just next door to Bais Hasefer is where you can get your honey cakes, strudel and the best chocolate babkas in all of Williamsburg!

The shofar has a unique shape that is the result of the natural horn being flatten and heated. Once hollowed, the horn may resemble a streamlined cornucopia or a series of waves. Depending on Jewish school of tradition, Askkenazic or Sephardic, the shofar may or may not have a carved mouthpiece.

Rosh Hashanah is more than about food, but the symbolism of the High Holy Day. While called the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah is actually a day of remembrance and judgment. Jewish people around the world celebrate this day with great food and hope for the coming year.