Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

Strong scenes include: Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa, and the United States. What they achieve on stage is nothing short of astounding. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture.

The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

While borrowing from different styles, EOTO’s improvisational skills have resulted in a style and genre of music that is completely their own. Some may call it “dubstep” or others may find their unique sound rooted in “house/breakbeat” or even drum and bass – but one thing’s for sure, they’re experts at detonating the party bomb.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

What really set things off on the underground was my group Jigmastas and Beyond Real, the single that we had out, starting the label, and working with people like J-Live, Mr. Complex, etc. etc. So I would say ’95 was the year that really started things off. I also had–my first remix was “Microphone Master” by Das EFX and “Stakes Is High” by De La Soul. I did two MC Eiht remixes. And that was it. That was the starting point.

I guess at the forefront of the underground “religious” movement, was the band “Rabbit in The Moon.” Even in the two, very short conversations I had with Monk in the 90s, it was obvious that they knew they were doing something completely different. Somehow, Rabbit were able to meld the chainsaws and death/destruction of the previous Goth scene with the late-night Rave scene. Their dark/ethereal show, combined with dark/trancy breaks-seemed to tell a story- and in that story- seemed to be hidden references to this “Raver religion.” Once, at a 4AM outdoor show, during a 3 day festival in Gainesville- Confucius even spoke of a hidden religion of some sort.

EOTO is now a full time gig for the pair with a seemingly endless tour featuring over 700 shows and sold out performances in every market in the country. They fine-tune their approach and skill with each and every show they play, making the next performance more unique than the last.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

Strong scenes include: Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa, and the United States. What they achieve on stage is nothing short of astounding. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture.

The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

While borrowing from different styles, EOTO’s improvisational skills have resulted in a style and genre of music that is completely their own. Some may call it “dubstep” or others may find their unique sound rooted in “house/breakbeat” or even drum and bass – but one thing’s for sure, they’re experts at detonating the party bomb.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

What really set things off on the underground was my group Jigmastas and Beyond Real, the single that we had out, starting the label, and working with people like J-Live, Mr. Complex, etc. etc. So I would say ’95 was the year that really started things off. I also had–my first remix was “Microphone Master” by Das EFX and “Stakes Is High” by De La Soul. I did two MC Eiht remixes. And that was it. That was the starting point.

I guess at the forefront of the underground “religious” movement, was the band “Rabbit in The Moon.” Even in the two, very short conversations I had with Monk in the 90s, it was obvious that they knew they were doing something completely different. Somehow, Rabbit were able to meld the chainsaws and death/destruction of the previous Goth scene with the late-night Rave scene. Their dark/ethereal show, combined with dark/trancy breaks-seemed to tell a story- and in that story- seemed to be hidden references to this “Raver religion.” Once, at a 4AM outdoor show, during a 3 day festival in Gainesville- Confucius even spoke of a hidden religion of some sort.

EOTO is now a full time gig for the pair with a seemingly endless tour featuring over 700 shows and sold out performances in every market in the country. They fine-tune their approach and skill with each and every show they play, making the next performance more unique than the last.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

Strong scenes include: Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa, and the United States. What they achieve on stage is nothing short of astounding. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture.

The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

While borrowing from different styles, EOTO’s improvisational skills have resulted in a style and genre of music that is completely their own. Some may call it “dubstep” or others may find their unique sound rooted in “house/breakbeat” or even drum and bass – but one thing’s for sure, they’re experts at detonating the party bomb.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

What really set things off on the underground was my group Jigmastas and Beyond Real, the single that we had out, starting the label, and working with people like J-Live, Mr. Complex, etc. etc. So I would say ’95 was the year that really started things off. I also had–my first remix was “Microphone Master” by Das EFX and “Stakes Is High” by De La Soul. I did two MC Eiht remixes. And that was it. That was the starting point.

I guess at the forefront of the underground “religious” movement, was the band “Rabbit in The Moon.” Even in the two, very short conversations I had with Monk in the 90s, it was obvious that they knew they were doing something completely different. Somehow, Rabbit were able to meld the chainsaws and death/destruction of the previous Goth scene with the late-night Rave scene. Their dark/ethereal show, combined with dark/trancy breaks-seemed to tell a story- and in that story- seemed to be hidden references to this “Raver religion.” Once, at a 4AM outdoor show, during a 3 day festival in Gainesville- Confucius even spoke of a hidden religion of some sort.

EOTO is now a full time gig for the pair with a seemingly endless tour featuring over 700 shows and sold out performances in every market in the country. They fine-tune their approach and skill with each and every show they play, making the next performance more unique than the last.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

Strong scenes include: Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa, and the United States. What they achieve on stage is nothing short of astounding. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture.

The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

While borrowing from different styles, EOTO’s improvisational skills have resulted in a style and genre of music that is completely their own. Some may call it “dubstep” or others may find their unique sound rooted in “house/breakbeat” or even drum and bass – but one thing’s for sure, they’re experts at detonating the party bomb.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

What really set things off on the underground was my group Jigmastas and Beyond Real, the single that we had out, starting the label, and working with people like J-Live, Mr. Complex, etc. etc. So I would say ’95 was the year that really started things off. I also had–my first remix was “Microphone Master” by Das EFX and “Stakes Is High” by De La Soul. I did two MC Eiht remixes. And that was it. That was the starting point.

I guess at the forefront of the underground “religious” movement, was the band “Rabbit in The Moon.” Even in the two, very short conversations I had with Monk in the 90s, it was obvious that they knew they were doing something completely different. Somehow, Rabbit were able to meld the chainsaws and death/destruction of the previous Goth scene with the late-night Rave scene. Their dark/ethereal show, combined with dark/trancy breaks-seemed to tell a story- and in that story- seemed to be hidden references to this “Raver religion.” Once, at a 4AM outdoor show, during a 3 day festival in Gainesville- Confucius even spoke of a hidden religion of some sort.

EOTO is now a full time gig for the pair with a seemingly endless tour featuring over 700 shows and sold out performances in every market in the country. They fine-tune their approach and skill with each and every show they play, making the next performance more unique than the last.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.