Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

My first name is short for Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, fertility and music. It’s another thing when that seasoned band comes with a Q&A featuring a one-of-a-kind entertainer like Henry Rollins. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

It’s one thing when a seasoned band like Dinosaur Jr. comes to the neighborhood for a one-of-a-kind show. It’s another thing when that seasoned band comes with a Q&A featuring a one-of-a-kind entertainer like Henry Rollins. Performing their re-issued album Bug in its entirety, the indie/alternative rock band will headline Variety Playhouse with OFF! – featuring Keith Morris of Black Flag – opening the show, as well as the Q&A hosted by actor/comedian/singer Henry Rollins of Black Flag.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

Lastly you will need to have rhythm and some type of music ability. Although I had basic music composition classes while in High School, I am no way a musician or know how to play by reading notes. However, I do have the ability to keep rhythm with a beat metronome and I am able to play melodies along with beats. No matter if you choose Hardware of Software, you will need to be able to keep rhythm and play in key when you make your beats.

My first name is short for Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, fertility and music. It’s another thing when that seasoned band comes with a Q&A featuring a one-of-a-kind entertainer like Henry Rollins. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

It’s one thing when a seasoned band like Dinosaur Jr. comes to the neighborhood for a one-of-a-kind show. It’s another thing when that seasoned band comes with a Q&A featuring a one-of-a-kind entertainer like Henry Rollins. Performing their re-issued album Bug in its entirety, the indie/alternative rock band will headline Variety Playhouse with OFF! – featuring Keith Morris of Black Flag – opening the show, as well as the Q&A hosted by actor/comedian/singer Henry Rollins of Black Flag.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

Lastly you will need to have rhythm and some type of music ability. Although I had basic music composition classes while in High School, I am no way a musician or know how to play by reading notes. However, I do have the ability to keep rhythm with a beat metronome and I am able to play melodies along with beats. No matter if you choose Hardware of Software, you will need to be able to keep rhythm and play in key when you make your beats.

Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

My first name is short for Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, fertility and music. It’s another thing when that seasoned band comes with a Q&A featuring a one-of-a-kind entertainer like Henry Rollins. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

It’s one thing when a seasoned band like Dinosaur Jr. comes to the neighborhood for a one-of-a-kind show. It’s another thing when that seasoned band comes with a Q&A featuring a one-of-a-kind entertainer like Henry Rollins. Performing their re-issued album Bug in its entirety, the indie/alternative rock band will headline Variety Playhouse with OFF! – featuring Keith Morris of Black Flag – opening the show, as well as the Q&A hosted by actor/comedian/singer Henry Rollins of Black Flag.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

Lastly you will need to have rhythm and some type of music ability. Although I had basic music composition classes while in High School, I am no way a musician or know how to play by reading notes. However, I do have the ability to keep rhythm with a beat metronome and I am able to play melodies along with beats. No matter if you choose Hardware of Software, you will need to be able to keep rhythm and play in key when you make your beats.

My first name is short for Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, fertility and music. It’s another thing when that seasoned band comes with a Q&A featuring a one-of-a-kind entertainer like Henry Rollins. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

It’s one thing when a seasoned band like Dinosaur Jr. comes to the neighborhood for a one-of-a-kind show. It’s another thing when that seasoned band comes with a Q&A featuring a one-of-a-kind entertainer like Henry Rollins. Performing their re-issued album Bug in its entirety, the indie/alternative rock band will headline Variety Playhouse with OFF! – featuring Keith Morris of Black Flag – opening the show, as well as the Q&A hosted by actor/comedian/singer Henry Rollins of Black Flag.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

Lastly you will need to have rhythm and some type of music ability. Although I had basic music composition classes while in High School, I am no way a musician or know how to play by reading notes. However, I do have the ability to keep rhythm with a beat metronome and I am able to play melodies along with beats. No matter if you choose Hardware of Software, you will need to be able to keep rhythm and play in key when you make your beats.