Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?
It’s sleazin’ season in Sacramento this weekend as we’ve got a greased up rock and roll festival called “Midnight Mass” (sacrilege, you heathens!) and a group of gals that used to be jailbait performing downtown – perhaps as a reminder to us late-twenty and early-thirty somethings that it doesn’t all have to be Saturdays at Home Depot just yet.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

I am happiest with the response and how many people have been inspired by it. Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. I think that if you can open up someone to your genre, then you have done your job perfectly and possibly made a new fan.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

Lastly you will need to have rhythm and some type of music ability. Although I had basic music composition classes while in High School, I am no way a musician or know how to play by reading notes. However, I do have the ability to keep rhythm with a beat metronome and I am able to play melodies along with beats. No matter if you choose Hardware of Software, you will need to be able to keep rhythm and play in key when you make your beats.

Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?
It’s sleazin’ season in Sacramento this weekend as we’ve got a greased up rock and roll festival called “Midnight Mass” (sacrilege, you heathens!) and a group of gals that used to be jailbait performing downtown – perhaps as a reminder to us late-twenty and early-thirty somethings that it doesn’t all have to be Saturdays at Home Depot just yet.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

I am happiest with the response and how many people have been inspired by it. Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. I think that if you can open up someone to your genre, then you have done your job perfectly and possibly made a new fan.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

Lastly you will need to have rhythm and some type of music ability. Although I had basic music composition classes while in High School, I am no way a musician or know how to play by reading notes. However, I do have the ability to keep rhythm with a beat metronome and I am able to play melodies along with beats. No matter if you choose Hardware of Software, you will need to be able to keep rhythm and play in key when you make your beats.

Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?
It’s sleazin’ season in Sacramento this weekend as we’ve got a greased up rock and roll festival called “Midnight Mass” (sacrilege, you heathens!) and a group of gals that used to be jailbait performing downtown – perhaps as a reminder to us late-twenty and early-thirty somethings that it doesn’t all have to be Saturdays at Home Depot just yet.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

I am happiest with the response and how many people have been inspired by it. Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. I think that if you can open up someone to your genre, then you have done your job perfectly and possibly made a new fan.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

Lastly you will need to have rhythm and some type of music ability. Although I had basic music composition classes while in High School, I am no way a musician or know how to play by reading notes. However, I do have the ability to keep rhythm with a beat metronome and I am able to play melodies along with beats. No matter if you choose Hardware of Software, you will need to be able to keep rhythm and play in key when you make your beats.

Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?
It’s sleazin’ season in Sacramento this weekend as we’ve got a greased up rock and roll festival called “Midnight Mass” (sacrilege, you heathens!) and a group of gals that used to be jailbait performing downtown – perhaps as a reminder to us late-twenty and early-thirty somethings that it doesn’t all have to be Saturdays at Home Depot just yet.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

I am happiest with the response and how many people have been inspired by it. Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. I think that if you can open up someone to your genre, then you have done your job perfectly and possibly made a new fan.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

Lastly you will need to have rhythm and some type of music ability. Although I had basic music composition classes while in High School, I am no way a musician or know how to play by reading notes. However, I do have the ability to keep rhythm with a beat metronome and I am able to play melodies along with beats. No matter if you choose Hardware of Software, you will need to be able to keep rhythm and play in key when you make your beats.