Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

Sure there were elements of earlier genres-freestyle, b-boy, disco, etc.of course we imported the early House from Europe. In the Netherlands field the fans are used to a slower, softer build up with breaks combined the entire time of track.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

Examiner: You just mentioned Rawkus Records. I know some of the artists from that time have since become disillusioned with that era, especially with Rawkus. Did you have any issues with the label yourself?

Samples are breakbeat generally taken from scratch”. It can be produced in several ways using a variety of instruments, downloaded through internet, or resourcefully bought by anybody.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

Sure there were elements of earlier genres-freestyle, b-boy, disco, etc.of course we imported the early House from Europe. In the Netherlands field the fans are used to a slower, softer build up with breaks combined the entire time of track.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

Examiner: You just mentioned Rawkus Records. I know some of the artists from that time have since become disillusioned with that era, especially with Rawkus. Did you have any issues with the label yourself?

Samples are breakbeat generally taken from scratch”. It can be produced in several ways using a variety of instruments, downloaded through internet, or resourcefully bought by anybody.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

Defqon 1 2011 Music Festival In Netherlands

Sure there were elements of earlier genres-freestyle, b-boy, disco, etc.of course we imported the early House from Europe. In the Netherlands field the fans are used to a slower, softer build up with breaks combined the entire time of track.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

Examiner: You just mentioned Rawkus Records. I know some of the artists from that time have since become disillusioned with that era, especially with Rawkus. Did you have any issues with the label yourself?

Samples are breakbeat generally taken from scratch”. It can be produced in several ways using a variety of instruments, downloaded through internet, or resourcefully bought by anybody.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

Sure there were elements of earlier genres-freestyle, b-boy, disco, etc.of course we imported the early House from Europe. In the Netherlands field the fans are used to a slower, softer build up with breaks combined the entire time of track.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

Examiner: You just mentioned Rawkus Records. I know some of the artists from that time have since become disillusioned with that era, especially with Rawkus. Did you have any issues with the label yourself?

Samples are breakbeat generally taken from scratch”. It can be produced in several ways using a variety of instruments, downloaded through internet, or resourcefully bought by anybody.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.