Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. It should be an interesting show, as each of the three bands brings a wholly different sound. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York.
Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

It’s one thing when a seasoned band like Dinosaur Jr. comes to the neighborhood for a one-of-a-kind show. It’s another thing when that seasoned band comes with a Q&A featuring a one-of-a-kind entertainer like Henry Rollins. Performing their re-issued album Bug in its entirety, the indie/alternative rock band will headline Variety Playhouse with OFF! – featuring Keith Morris of Black Flag – opening the show, as well as the Q&A hosted by actor/comedian/singer Henry Rollins of Black Flag.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

The Rave breakbeat scene however is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

The Spring Massive at the Paradox is gonna be insane as will Starscape 2009. I am also headlining this huge three-day festival alongside DJ Swamp and like 50 others called Willy Wonka and the Bass Factory on June 19-21 in West Virginia, which I am sure will be an experience!

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. It should be an interesting show, as each of the three bands brings a wholly different sound. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York.
Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

It’s one thing when a seasoned band like Dinosaur Jr. comes to the neighborhood for a one-of-a-kind show. It’s another thing when that seasoned band comes with a Q&A featuring a one-of-a-kind entertainer like Henry Rollins. Performing their re-issued album Bug in its entirety, the indie/alternative rock band will headline Variety Playhouse with OFF! – featuring Keith Morris of Black Flag – opening the show, as well as the Q&A hosted by actor/comedian/singer Henry Rollins of Black Flag.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

The Rave breakbeat scene however is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

The Spring Massive at the Paradox is gonna be insane as will Starscape 2009. I am also headlining this huge three-day festival alongside DJ Swamp and like 50 others called Willy Wonka and the Bass Factory on June 19-21 in West Virginia, which I am sure will be an experience!

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. It should be an interesting show, as each of the three bands brings a wholly different sound. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York.
Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

It’s one thing when a seasoned band like Dinosaur Jr. comes to the neighborhood for a one-of-a-kind show. It’s another thing when that seasoned band comes with a Q&A featuring a one-of-a-kind entertainer like Henry Rollins. Performing their re-issued album Bug in its entirety, the indie/alternative rock band will headline Variety Playhouse with OFF! – featuring Keith Morris of Black Flag – opening the show, as well as the Q&A hosted by actor/comedian/singer Henry Rollins of Black Flag.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

The Rave breakbeat scene however is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

The Spring Massive at the Paradox is gonna be insane as will Starscape 2009. I am also headlining this huge three-day festival alongside DJ Swamp and like 50 others called Willy Wonka and the Bass Factory on June 19-21 in West Virginia, which I am sure will be an experience!

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. It should be an interesting show, as each of the three bands brings a wholly different sound. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York.
Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

It’s one thing when a seasoned band like Dinosaur Jr. comes to the neighborhood for a one-of-a-kind show. It’s another thing when that seasoned band comes with a Q&A featuring a one-of-a-kind entertainer like Henry Rollins. Performing their re-issued album Bug in its entirety, the indie/alternative rock band will headline Variety Playhouse with OFF! – featuring Keith Morris of Black Flag – opening the show, as well as the Q&A hosted by actor/comedian/singer Henry Rollins of Black Flag.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

The Rave breakbeat scene however is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

The Spring Massive at the Paradox is gonna be insane as will Starscape 2009. I am also headlining this huge three-day festival alongside DJ Swamp and like 50 others called Willy Wonka and the Bass Factory on June 19-21 in West Virginia, which I am sure will be an experience!