Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

As time has gone by and the genre has evolved, the BPM has raised and as a result, the tracks seem faster now a day. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix.
Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Because it is a type of dance music, drum and bass can be best appreciated to the fullest extent in clubs and discotheques. The bass is breakbeat very pronounced suggest by its name. Despite the popular preference of it being club music, many albums have been produced for personal listening. The most successful drum and bass artists to date include Pendulum, Shy FX, High Contrast, and Black Sun Empire.

It didn’t take long before the scene developed it’s own “work uniform.” Designer sweat pants, visors, and T-Shirts hit the late scene in swarms. By 2005, Ravers were creating their own clothing lines-many going on to gain national markets. You still wore your “work uniform” to the parties, but now it was your “SCENE uniform.” Gone were the days of getting off work at the convenience store and coming straight in to the club. NOW, you went out of your way to look the part, covering yourself in Raver gear like Split, Alien Workshop, and even some national brands that had gotten involved (Puma, Adidas, etc).Those who didn’t have the gear would become “shunned.” The scene that originated as welcoming all, where everyone could be themselves, had changed. And the people changed- to FIT the scene.

Think About It (Lyn Collins) – Rob Base & DJ E-Z Rock’s popular hip hop club hit “It Takes Two” has used the funk classic beat “Think (About It) as its loop sample.

The Spring Massive at the Paradox is gonna be insane as will Starscape 2009. I am also headlining this huge three-day festival alongside DJ Swamp and like 50 others called Willy Wonka and the Bass Factory on June 19-21 in West Virginia, which I am sure will be an experience!

As time has gone by and the genre has evolved, the BPM has raised and as a result, the tracks seem faster now a day. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix.
Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Because it is a type of dance music, drum and bass can be best appreciated to the fullest extent in clubs and discotheques. The bass is breakbeat very pronounced suggest by its name. Despite the popular preference of it being club music, many albums have been produced for personal listening. The most successful drum and bass artists to date include Pendulum, Shy FX, High Contrast, and Black Sun Empire.

It didn’t take long before the scene developed it’s own “work uniform.” Designer sweat pants, visors, and T-Shirts hit the late scene in swarms. By 2005, Ravers were creating their own clothing lines-many going on to gain national markets. You still wore your “work uniform” to the parties, but now it was your “SCENE uniform.” Gone were the days of getting off work at the convenience store and coming straight in to the club. NOW, you went out of your way to look the part, covering yourself in Raver gear like Split, Alien Workshop, and even some national brands that had gotten involved (Puma, Adidas, etc).Those who didn’t have the gear would become “shunned.” The scene that originated as welcoming all, where everyone could be themselves, had changed. And the people changed- to FIT the scene.

Think About It (Lyn Collins) – Rob Base & DJ E-Z Rock’s popular hip hop club hit “It Takes Two” has used the funk classic beat “Think (About It) as its loop sample.

The Spring Massive at the Paradox is gonna be insane as will Starscape 2009. I am also headlining this huge three-day festival alongside DJ Swamp and like 50 others called Willy Wonka and the Bass Factory on June 19-21 in West Virginia, which I am sure will be an experience!

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

As time has gone by and the genre has evolved, the BPM has raised and as a result, the tracks seem faster now a day. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix.
Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Because it is a type of dance music, drum and bass can be best appreciated to the fullest extent in clubs and discotheques. The bass is breakbeat very pronounced suggest by its name. Despite the popular preference of it being club music, many albums have been produced for personal listening. The most successful drum and bass artists to date include Pendulum, Shy FX, High Contrast, and Black Sun Empire.

It didn’t take long before the scene developed it’s own “work uniform.” Designer sweat pants, visors, and T-Shirts hit the late scene in swarms. By 2005, Ravers were creating their own clothing lines-many going on to gain national markets. You still wore your “work uniform” to the parties, but now it was your “SCENE uniform.” Gone were the days of getting off work at the convenience store and coming straight in to the club. NOW, you went out of your way to look the part, covering yourself in Raver gear like Split, Alien Workshop, and even some national brands that had gotten involved (Puma, Adidas, etc).Those who didn’t have the gear would become “shunned.” The scene that originated as welcoming all, where everyone could be themselves, had changed. And the people changed- to FIT the scene.

Think About It (Lyn Collins) – Rob Base & DJ E-Z Rock’s popular hip hop club hit “It Takes Two” has used the funk classic beat “Think (About It) as its loop sample.

The Spring Massive at the Paradox is gonna be insane as will Starscape 2009. I am also headlining this huge three-day festival alongside DJ Swamp and like 50 others called Willy Wonka and the Bass Factory on June 19-21 in West Virginia, which I am sure will be an experience!

As time has gone by and the genre has evolved, the BPM has raised and as a result, the tracks seem faster now a day. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix.
Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Because it is a type of dance music, drum and bass can be best appreciated to the fullest extent in clubs and discotheques. The bass is breakbeat very pronounced suggest by its name. Despite the popular preference of it being club music, many albums have been produced for personal listening. The most successful drum and bass artists to date include Pendulum, Shy FX, High Contrast, and Black Sun Empire.

It didn’t take long before the scene developed it’s own “work uniform.” Designer sweat pants, visors, and T-Shirts hit the late scene in swarms. By 2005, Ravers were creating their own clothing lines-many going on to gain national markets. You still wore your “work uniform” to the parties, but now it was your “SCENE uniform.” Gone were the days of getting off work at the convenience store and coming straight in to the club. NOW, you went out of your way to look the part, covering yourself in Raver gear like Split, Alien Workshop, and even some national brands that had gotten involved (Puma, Adidas, etc).Those who didn’t have the gear would become “shunned.” The scene that originated as welcoming all, where everyone could be themselves, had changed. And the people changed- to FIT the scene.

Think About It (Lyn Collins) – Rob Base & DJ E-Z Rock’s popular hip hop club hit “It Takes Two” has used the funk classic beat “Think (About It) as its loop sample.

The Spring Massive at the Paradox is gonna be insane as will Starscape 2009. I am also headlining this huge three-day festival alongside DJ Swamp and like 50 others called Willy Wonka and the Bass Factory on June 19-21 in West Virginia, which I am sure will be an experience!