Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

After the buzz from the first installment of this dub-metal show, it was inevitable for this monstrous event to keep going. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer.
DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

It was the culmination of a formula I have been working on over my last few mixes. The ultimate goal was to make a mix where there is little or no “down time”. Using 15 tracks with 14 different a capellas I try to keep the energy up and the flow congruent through careful selection and placement of said a capellas.

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

Live drums, guitars, keys, and vocals are mixed, remixed, and sampled on the fly using cutting-edge programs. Incredibly, it’s all done without a script – and without a net.

Examiner: You just mentioned Rawkus Records. I know some of the artists from that time have since become disillusioned with that era, especially with Rawkus. Did you have any issues with the label yourself?

Eventually, the idea of the “vibe” became more widespread, encompassing everything- the music, the people, the overall feeling of the party. Almost everyone believed in it now. Ravers believed that this entity could appear out of nowhere, much like the “Holy Spirit”, coming down upon the party and blessing it with good times.

After the release of Nineteen Naughty Nine: Nature’s Fury, a dispute regarding finances developed between Kay Gee and Treach, with Treach blaming Kay Gee for squandering the group’s finances. Due to these disagreements DJ Kay Gee decided to leave Naughty by Nature in late 2000. He started to develop his own record label Divine Mill. The remainder of the group, Treach and Vin Rock, released an album in 2002 called IIcons, using a variety of different producers including Da Beatminerz; the album, however, received a lukewarm reception from the public. IIcons is their last album to date.

After the buzz from the first installment of this dub-metal show, it was inevitable for this monstrous event to keep going. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer.
DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

It was the culmination of a formula I have been working on over my last few mixes. The ultimate goal was to make a mix where there is little or no “down time”. Using 15 tracks with 14 different a capellas I try to keep the energy up and the flow congruent through careful selection and placement of said a capellas.

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

Live drums, guitars, keys, and vocals are mixed, remixed, and sampled on the fly using cutting-edge programs. Incredibly, it’s all done without a script – and without a net.

Examiner: You just mentioned Rawkus Records. I know some of the artists from that time have since become disillusioned with that era, especially with Rawkus. Did you have any issues with the label yourself?

Eventually, the idea of the “vibe” became more widespread, encompassing everything- the music, the people, the overall feeling of the party. Almost everyone believed in it now. Ravers believed that this entity could appear out of nowhere, much like the “Holy Spirit”, coming down upon the party and blessing it with good times.

After the release of Nineteen Naughty Nine: Nature’s Fury, a dispute regarding finances developed between Kay Gee and Treach, with Treach blaming Kay Gee for squandering the group’s finances. Due to these disagreements DJ Kay Gee decided to leave Naughty by Nature in late 2000. He started to develop his own record label Divine Mill. The remainder of the group, Treach and Vin Rock, released an album in 2002 called IIcons, using a variety of different producers including Da Beatminerz; the album, however, received a lukewarm reception from the public. IIcons is their last album to date.

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

After the buzz from the first installment of this dub-metal show, it was inevitable for this monstrous event to keep going. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer.
DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

It was the culmination of a formula I have been working on over my last few mixes. The ultimate goal was to make a mix where there is little or no “down time”. Using 15 tracks with 14 different a capellas I try to keep the energy up and the flow congruent through careful selection and placement of said a capellas.

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

Live drums, guitars, keys, and vocals are mixed, remixed, and sampled on the fly using cutting-edge programs. Incredibly, it’s all done without a script – and without a net.

Examiner: You just mentioned Rawkus Records. I know some of the artists from that time have since become disillusioned with that era, especially with Rawkus. Did you have any issues with the label yourself?

Eventually, the idea of the “vibe” became more widespread, encompassing everything- the music, the people, the overall feeling of the party. Almost everyone believed in it now. Ravers believed that this entity could appear out of nowhere, much like the “Holy Spirit”, coming down upon the party and blessing it with good times.

After the release of Nineteen Naughty Nine: Nature’s Fury, a dispute regarding finances developed between Kay Gee and Treach, with Treach blaming Kay Gee for squandering the group’s finances. Due to these disagreements DJ Kay Gee decided to leave Naughty by Nature in late 2000. He started to develop his own record label Divine Mill. The remainder of the group, Treach and Vin Rock, released an album in 2002 called IIcons, using a variety of different producers including Da Beatminerz; the album, however, received a lukewarm reception from the public. IIcons is their last album to date.

After the buzz from the first installment of this dub-metal show, it was inevitable for this monstrous event to keep going. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer.
DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

It was the culmination of a formula I have been working on over my last few mixes. The ultimate goal was to make a mix where there is little or no “down time”. Using 15 tracks with 14 different a capellas I try to keep the energy up and the flow congruent through careful selection and placement of said a capellas.

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

Live drums, guitars, keys, and vocals are mixed, remixed, and sampled on the fly using cutting-edge programs. Incredibly, it’s all done without a script – and without a net.

Examiner: You just mentioned Rawkus Records. I know some of the artists from that time have since become disillusioned with that era, especially with Rawkus. Did you have any issues with the label yourself?

Eventually, the idea of the “vibe” became more widespread, encompassing everything- the music, the people, the overall feeling of the party. Almost everyone believed in it now. Ravers believed that this entity could appear out of nowhere, much like the “Holy Spirit”, coming down upon the party and blessing it with good times.

After the release of Nineteen Naughty Nine: Nature’s Fury, a dispute regarding finances developed between Kay Gee and Treach, with Treach blaming Kay Gee for squandering the group’s finances. Due to these disagreements DJ Kay Gee decided to leave Naughty by Nature in late 2000. He started to develop his own record label Divine Mill. The remainder of the group, Treach and Vin Rock, released an album in 2002 called IIcons, using a variety of different producers including Da Beatminerz; the album, however, received a lukewarm reception from the public. IIcons is their last album to date.