Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. 10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently.
When hip hop was nearly beginning, it was very much compulsory to keep a compilation of samples and drum breaks. But as time passes by, the use of the same songs repeatedly became less indispensable because of the modern sampling technology and the overture of live instrumentation.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

It didn’t take long before the scene developed it’s own “work uniform.” Designer sweat pants, visors, and T-Shirts hit the late scene in swarms. By 2005, Ravers were creating their own clothing lines-many going on to gain national markets. You still wore your “work uniform” to the parties, but now it was your “SCENE uniform.” Gone were the days of getting off work at the convenience store and coming straight in to the club. NOW you went out of your way to look the part covering yourself in Raver gear like Split Alien Workshop and even some national brands that had gotten involved Puma Adidas etc).Those who didn’t have the gear would become breakbeat shunned The scene that originated as welcoming all where everyone could be themselves had changed. And the people changed- to FIT the scene.

Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention. What they achieve on stage is nothing short of astounding. Performed with all of the bells and whistles of a traditional electronic artist plus the addition of live instruments and vocals, the duo creates every bass ridden blast right before your eyes – without the addition of a single pre-recorded track.

It’s back to kick off the summer season! After the buzz from the first installment of this dub-metal show, it was inevitable for this monstrous event to keep going. Featured for Vol. 2: Mutiny is A Fight for Life, Dan Brown, Collapse of the Empire and a special collaboration between Dubstruction returners Forge by Fire and TRiLLBASS.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

The bassline in drum and bass plays half of the speed of the drums. The changing of this equation produces “faster” and “slower” sounding tracks. Guitar riffs and extra beats are added and the BPMs are made higher to alter the sound of the song. Since 1996, tracks have remained in the mid-170 BPM range, producing what we know today as drum and bass.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. 10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently.
When hip hop was nearly beginning, it was very much compulsory to keep a compilation of samples and drum breaks. But as time passes by, the use of the same songs repeatedly became less indispensable because of the modern sampling technology and the overture of live instrumentation.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

It didn’t take long before the scene developed it’s own “work uniform.” Designer sweat pants, visors, and T-Shirts hit the late scene in swarms. By 2005, Ravers were creating their own clothing lines-many going on to gain national markets. You still wore your “work uniform” to the parties, but now it was your “SCENE uniform.” Gone were the days of getting off work at the convenience store and coming straight in to the club. NOW you went out of your way to look the part covering yourself in Raver gear like Split Alien Workshop and even some national brands that had gotten involved Puma Adidas etc).Those who didn’t have the gear would become breakbeat shunned The scene that originated as welcoming all where everyone could be themselves had changed. And the people changed- to FIT the scene.

Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention. What they achieve on stage is nothing short of astounding. Performed with all of the bells and whistles of a traditional electronic artist plus the addition of live instruments and vocals, the duo creates every bass ridden blast right before your eyes – without the addition of a single pre-recorded track.

It’s back to kick off the summer season! After the buzz from the first installment of this dub-metal show, it was inevitable for this monstrous event to keep going. Featured for Vol. 2: Mutiny is A Fight for Life, Dan Brown, Collapse of the Empire and a special collaboration between Dubstruction returners Forge by Fire and TRiLLBASS.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

The bassline in drum and bass plays half of the speed of the drums. The changing of this equation produces “faster” and “slower” sounding tracks. Guitar riffs and extra beats are added and the BPMs are made higher to alter the sound of the song. Since 1996, tracks have remained in the mid-170 BPM range, producing what we know today as drum and bass.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. 10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently.
When hip hop was nearly beginning, it was very much compulsory to keep a compilation of samples and drum breaks. But as time passes by, the use of the same songs repeatedly became less indispensable because of the modern sampling technology and the overture of live instrumentation.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

It didn’t take long before the scene developed it’s own “work uniform.” Designer sweat pants, visors, and T-Shirts hit the late scene in swarms. By 2005, Ravers were creating their own clothing lines-many going on to gain national markets. You still wore your “work uniform” to the parties, but now it was your “SCENE uniform.” Gone were the days of getting off work at the convenience store and coming straight in to the club. NOW you went out of your way to look the part covering yourself in Raver gear like Split Alien Workshop and even some national brands that had gotten involved Puma Adidas etc).Those who didn’t have the gear would become breakbeat shunned The scene that originated as welcoming all where everyone could be themselves had changed. And the people changed- to FIT the scene.

Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention. What they achieve on stage is nothing short of astounding. Performed with all of the bells and whistles of a traditional electronic artist plus the addition of live instruments and vocals, the duo creates every bass ridden blast right before your eyes – without the addition of a single pre-recorded track.

It’s back to kick off the summer season! After the buzz from the first installment of this dub-metal show, it was inevitable for this monstrous event to keep going. Featured for Vol. 2: Mutiny is A Fight for Life, Dan Brown, Collapse of the Empire and a special collaboration between Dubstruction returners Forge by Fire and TRiLLBASS.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

The bassline in drum and bass plays half of the speed of the drums. The changing of this equation produces “faster” and “slower” sounding tracks. Guitar riffs and extra beats are added and the BPMs are made higher to alter the sound of the song. Since 1996, tracks have remained in the mid-170 BPM range, producing what we know today as drum and bass.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. 10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently.
When hip hop was nearly beginning, it was very much compulsory to keep a compilation of samples and drum breaks. But as time passes by, the use of the same songs repeatedly became less indispensable because of the modern sampling technology and the overture of live instrumentation.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

It didn’t take long before the scene developed it’s own “work uniform.” Designer sweat pants, visors, and T-Shirts hit the late scene in swarms. By 2005, Ravers were creating their own clothing lines-many going on to gain national markets. You still wore your “work uniform” to the parties, but now it was your “SCENE uniform.” Gone were the days of getting off work at the convenience store and coming straight in to the club. NOW you went out of your way to look the part covering yourself in Raver gear like Split Alien Workshop and even some national brands that had gotten involved Puma Adidas etc).Those who didn’t have the gear would become breakbeat shunned The scene that originated as welcoming all where everyone could be themselves had changed. And the people changed- to FIT the scene.

Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention. What they achieve on stage is nothing short of astounding. Performed with all of the bells and whistles of a traditional electronic artist plus the addition of live instruments and vocals, the duo creates every bass ridden blast right before your eyes – without the addition of a single pre-recorded track.

It’s back to kick off the summer season! After the buzz from the first installment of this dub-metal show, it was inevitable for this monstrous event to keep going. Featured for Vol. 2: Mutiny is A Fight for Life, Dan Brown, Collapse of the Empire and a special collaboration between Dubstruction returners Forge by Fire and TRiLLBASS.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

The bassline in drum and bass plays half of the speed of the drums. The changing of this equation produces “faster” and “slower” sounding tracks. Guitar riffs and extra beats are added and the BPMs are made higher to alter the sound of the song. Since 1996, tracks have remained in the mid-170 BPM range, producing what we know today as drum and bass.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.