Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. I first started out with a DR-660 drum machine about 18 years ago.

Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

Hip Hop samples are actually bits of recorded music taken out from previous copies to be used in creating new songs. Mostly, these extracts came from 60’s soul and funk records of the 70’s. breakbeat s started in 1972 when DJ Kool Herc began using two turntables to combine records collectively and produce one long breakbeat. This has become popular to knock over and was significantly used to build the basis of hip hop.

Later, the group had multiple hits from its third and fourth albums, called 19 Naughty III and Poverty’s Paradise respectively. Both albums reached the #1 spot on the R&B/Hip-Hop Charts. “Hip Hop Hooray” was a success from the album 19 Naughty III.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Ready Or Not, Here I Come (The Delfonics) – This music sample was actually made popular by Timberland when he arranged his partner Missy Elliott with the wonderful hit for Sock It 2 Me. This became so hot which turned out to be Missy Elliot’s best work. Da Brat was even invited on it.

Later on I was able to get my hands on a Roland XP-60 Workstation and a Roland MV-8000 Sampler/Sequencer. Again this is physical hardware that you are able to play. The XP-60 had stock sounds but could you not add sounds. However, the MV-8000 which is a sampler/sequencer was able to add sounds and sample. This really opened the door for creativity being able to import new sounds and sample new things.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.

Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. I first started out with a DR-660 drum machine about 18 years ago.

Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

Hip Hop samples are actually bits of recorded music taken out from previous copies to be used in creating new songs. Mostly, these extracts came from 60’s soul and funk records of the 70’s. breakbeat s started in 1972 when DJ Kool Herc began using two turntables to combine records collectively and produce one long breakbeat. This has become popular to knock over and was significantly used to build the basis of hip hop.

Later, the group had multiple hits from its third and fourth albums, called 19 Naughty III and Poverty’s Paradise respectively. Both albums reached the #1 spot on the R&B/Hip-Hop Charts. “Hip Hop Hooray” was a success from the album 19 Naughty III.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Ready Or Not, Here I Come (The Delfonics) – This music sample was actually made popular by Timberland when he arranged his partner Missy Elliott with the wonderful hit for Sock It 2 Me. This became so hot which turned out to be Missy Elliot’s best work. Da Brat was even invited on it.

Later on I was able to get my hands on a Roland XP-60 Workstation and a Roland MV-8000 Sampler/Sequencer. Again this is physical hardware that you are able to play. The XP-60 had stock sounds but could you not add sounds. However, the MV-8000 which is a sampler/sequencer was able to add sounds and sample. This really opened the door for creativity being able to import new sounds and sample new things.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. I first started out with a DR-660 drum machine about 18 years ago.

Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

Hip Hop samples are actually bits of recorded music taken out from previous copies to be used in creating new songs. Mostly, these extracts came from 60’s soul and funk records of the 70’s. breakbeat s started in 1972 when DJ Kool Herc began using two turntables to combine records collectively and produce one long breakbeat. This has become popular to knock over and was significantly used to build the basis of hip hop.

Later, the group had multiple hits from its third and fourth albums, called 19 Naughty III and Poverty’s Paradise respectively. Both albums reached the #1 spot on the R&B/Hip-Hop Charts. “Hip Hop Hooray” was a success from the album 19 Naughty III.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Ready Or Not, Here I Come (The Delfonics) – This music sample was actually made popular by Timberland when he arranged his partner Missy Elliott with the wonderful hit for Sock It 2 Me. This became so hot which turned out to be Missy Elliot’s best work. Da Brat was even invited on it.

Later on I was able to get my hands on a Roland XP-60 Workstation and a Roland MV-8000 Sampler/Sequencer. Again this is physical hardware that you are able to play. The XP-60 had stock sounds but could you not add sounds. However, the MV-8000 which is a sampler/sequencer was able to add sounds and sample. This really opened the door for creativity being able to import new sounds and sample new things.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.

Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. I first started out with a DR-660 drum machine about 18 years ago.

Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

Hip Hop samples are actually bits of recorded music taken out from previous copies to be used in creating new songs. Mostly, these extracts came from 60’s soul and funk records of the 70’s. breakbeat s started in 1972 when DJ Kool Herc began using two turntables to combine records collectively and produce one long breakbeat. This has become popular to knock over and was significantly used to build the basis of hip hop.

Later, the group had multiple hits from its third and fourth albums, called 19 Naughty III and Poverty’s Paradise respectively. Both albums reached the #1 spot on the R&B/Hip-Hop Charts. “Hip Hop Hooray” was a success from the album 19 Naughty III.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Ready Or Not, Here I Come (The Delfonics) – This music sample was actually made popular by Timberland when he arranged his partner Missy Elliott with the wonderful hit for Sock It 2 Me. This became so hot which turned out to be Missy Elliot’s best work. Da Brat was even invited on it.

Later on I was able to get my hands on a Roland XP-60 Workstation and a Roland MV-8000 Sampler/Sequencer. Again this is physical hardware that you are able to play. The XP-60 had stock sounds but could you not add sounds. However, the MV-8000 which is a sampler/sequencer was able to add sounds and sample. This really opened the door for creativity being able to import new sounds and sample new things.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.