Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up.
Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

The album also generated another hit, a reworking of Bob Marley’s “No Woman No Cry” called “Everything’s Gonna be All Right” (the track was also called “Ghetto Bastard” on some explicit releases). That song detailed the experiences of Treach growing up in poverty, and now rising up to live a better life. Powered by the success of that song and “O.P.P.”, their self titled album went platinum.

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

EOTO is now a full time gig for the pair with a seemingly endless tour featuring over 700 shows and sold out performances in every market in the country. They fine-tune their approach and skill with each and every show they play, making the next performance more unique than the last.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.

Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up.
Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

The album also generated another hit, a reworking of Bob Marley’s “No Woman No Cry” called “Everything’s Gonna be All Right” (the track was also called “Ghetto Bastard” on some explicit releases). That song detailed the experiences of Treach growing up in poverty, and now rising up to live a better life. Powered by the success of that song and “O.P.P.”, their self titled album went platinum.

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

EOTO is now a full time gig for the pair with a seemingly endless tour featuring over 700 shows and sold out performances in every market in the country. They fine-tune their approach and skill with each and every show they play, making the next performance more unique than the last.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Dj Nysus Brings A Ruckus With Same As He Ever Was

Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up.
Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

The album also generated another hit, a reworking of Bob Marley’s “No Woman No Cry” called “Everything’s Gonna be All Right” (the track was also called “Ghetto Bastard” on some explicit releases). That song detailed the experiences of Treach growing up in poverty, and now rising up to live a better life. Powered by the success of that song and “O.P.P.”, their self titled album went platinum.

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

EOTO is now a full time gig for the pair with a seemingly endless tour featuring over 700 shows and sold out performances in every market in the country. They fine-tune their approach and skill with each and every show they play, making the next performance more unique than the last.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.

Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up.
Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

The album also generated another hit, a reworking of Bob Marley’s “No Woman No Cry” called “Everything’s Gonna be All Right” (the track was also called “Ghetto Bastard” on some explicit releases). That song detailed the experiences of Treach growing up in poverty, and now rising up to live a better life. Powered by the success of that song and “O.P.P.”, their self titled album went platinum.

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

EOTO is now a full time gig for the pair with a seemingly endless tour featuring over 700 shows and sold out performances in every market in the country. They fine-tune their approach and skill with each and every show they play, making the next performance more unique than the last.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.