G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would.

Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

There are lots of other music genres some of which are well-known. This music is thought for coming about a figure mix figure of another musical genre mostly trance and rave song. Dance song has also been considered that has been Hardstyle classified. Hardstyle fans, like one other music genre have been often disputing. Different debates on this have also been started. The individuals who are the genre fans may come about able for asking you upright away anyplace the track had been made freshly by listening to its rhythm and approach. In the Netherlands field the fans are used to a slower, softer build up with breaks combined the entire time of track. In the South Africa field Defqon 2011 Hardstyle incorporates a kick drums popping sounds combination of the hard-hitting low.

So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. By Hardware I mean physical Drum Machines, Samplers and Keyboards/Workstations that you touch and play with your hands. I first started out with a DR-660 drum machine about 18 years ago. This was my first piece of “real” studio equipment. Before then I was just using breakbeat records on turntables and recording over a home stereo. This drum machine had stocks sounds that could be manipulated with effects like reverb and flange but you could not add sounds. You could however record patterns and then arrange those patterns into songs. I was able to learn a lot by using that drum machine and it was good to be able to play the pads to hear and record the sounds.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.

The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would.

Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

There are lots of other music genres some of which are well-known. This music is thought for coming about a figure mix figure of another musical genre mostly trance and rave song. Dance song has also been considered that has been Hardstyle classified. Hardstyle fans, like one other music genre have been often disputing. Different debates on this have also been started. The individuals who are the genre fans may come about able for asking you upright away anyplace the track had been made freshly by listening to its rhythm and approach. In the Netherlands field the fans are used to a slower, softer build up with breaks combined the entire time of track. In the South Africa field Defqon 2011 Hardstyle incorporates a kick drums popping sounds combination of the hard-hitting low.

So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. By Hardware I mean physical Drum Machines, Samplers and Keyboards/Workstations that you touch and play with your hands. I first started out with a DR-660 drum machine about 18 years ago. This was my first piece of “real” studio equipment. Before then I was just using breakbeat records on turntables and recording over a home stereo. This drum machine had stocks sounds that could be manipulated with effects like reverb and flange but you could not add sounds. You could however record patterns and then arrange those patterns into songs. I was able to learn a lot by using that drum machine and it was good to be able to play the pads to hear and record the sounds.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would.

Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

There are lots of other music genres some of which are well-known. This music is thought for coming about a figure mix figure of another musical genre mostly trance and rave song. Dance song has also been considered that has been Hardstyle classified. Hardstyle fans, like one other music genre have been often disputing. Different debates on this have also been started. The individuals who are the genre fans may come about able for asking you upright away anyplace the track had been made freshly by listening to its rhythm and approach. In the Netherlands field the fans are used to a slower, softer build up with breaks combined the entire time of track. In the South Africa field Defqon 2011 Hardstyle incorporates a kick drums popping sounds combination of the hard-hitting low.

So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. By Hardware I mean physical Drum Machines, Samplers and Keyboards/Workstations that you touch and play with your hands. I first started out with a DR-660 drum machine about 18 years ago. This was my first piece of “real” studio equipment. Before then I was just using breakbeat records on turntables and recording over a home stereo. This drum machine had stocks sounds that could be manipulated with effects like reverb and flange but you could not add sounds. You could however record patterns and then arrange those patterns into songs. I was able to learn a lot by using that drum machine and it was good to be able to play the pads to hear and record the sounds.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.

The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would.

Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

There are lots of other music genres some of which are well-known. This music is thought for coming about a figure mix figure of another musical genre mostly trance and rave song. Dance song has also been considered that has been Hardstyle classified. Hardstyle fans, like one other music genre have been often disputing. Different debates on this have also been started. The individuals who are the genre fans may come about able for asking you upright away anyplace the track had been made freshly by listening to its rhythm and approach. In the Netherlands field the fans are used to a slower, softer build up with breaks combined the entire time of track. In the South Africa field Defqon 2011 Hardstyle incorporates a kick drums popping sounds combination of the hard-hitting low.

So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. By Hardware I mean physical Drum Machines, Samplers and Keyboards/Workstations that you touch and play with your hands. I first started out with a DR-660 drum machine about 18 years ago. This was my first piece of “real” studio equipment. Before then I was just using breakbeat records on turntables and recording over a home stereo. This drum machine had stocks sounds that could be manipulated with effects like reverb and flange but you could not add sounds. You could however record patterns and then arrange those patterns into songs. I was able to learn a lot by using that drum machine and it was good to be able to play the pads to hear and record the sounds.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.