G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

The most successful drum and bass artists to date include Pendulum, Shy FX, High Contrast, and Black Sun Empire. Because it is a type of dance music, drum and bass can be best appreciated to the fullest extent in clubs and discotheques.
Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

Later, the group had multiple hits from its third and fourth albums, called 19 Naughty III and Poverty’s Paradise respectively. Both albums reached the #1 spot on the R&B/Hip-Hop Charts. “Hip Hop Hooray” was a success from the album 19 Naughty III.

Their first hit as Naughty by Nature was a track called “O.P.P.,” which sampled the Jackson 5’s hit “ABC” and was released in 1991 on their self-titled album Naughty by Nature. The song peaked at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 , making it one of the most successful rap songs in history to that point in terms of crossover success on the pop charts.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

It was poignantly funky. It started with turntables. Then came the guitar – a riff i couldn’t stop singing for the rest of the night. The unique take on a typical blues call and response peppered with some of the slickest organ lines i have heard in many years, coupled with the sheer magnitude of the big breakbeat drums underscored Amanda Davids’ powerful voice perfectly. Then came the organ solo. The sound itself, was warm but gritty, the playing, malevolent but refined – clearly the culmination of many years of listening to the masters, and even studying with one. All i can say is that i highly reccomend buying a copy. Use it for your alarm clock and your cell phone ringtone, because it will get your attention.

The decor at Dazzling on King street was abuzz just the same with it’s pastel cream friezes alight with ethereal but ebulliant colours emanating from stealthily stowed colourful LED lights. I spoke to the promoter of the night, entitled “Sake and Soul”, an energetic guy named “Ace” who exclaimed “this will be good, every single table has been booked.” The house band played on. “Sake and Soul”, a reference to the 70’s soul covers typically twisted by the house band into a modern pallette of mash-ups while patrons dine from a menu of pan-asian fusion dishes has been an ongoing fixture of Toronto’s King street scene for over a year now.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.

The most successful drum and bass artists to date include Pendulum, Shy FX, High Contrast, and Black Sun Empire. Because it is a type of dance music, drum and bass can be best appreciated to the fullest extent in clubs and discotheques.
Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

Later, the group had multiple hits from its third and fourth albums, called 19 Naughty III and Poverty’s Paradise respectively. Both albums reached the #1 spot on the R&B/Hip-Hop Charts. “Hip Hop Hooray” was a success from the album 19 Naughty III.

Their first hit as Naughty by Nature was a track called “O.P.P.,” which sampled the Jackson 5’s hit “ABC” and was released in 1991 on their self-titled album Naughty by Nature. The song peaked at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 , making it one of the most successful rap songs in history to that point in terms of crossover success on the pop charts.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

It was poignantly funky. It started with turntables. Then came the guitar – a riff i couldn’t stop singing for the rest of the night. The unique take on a typical blues call and response peppered with some of the slickest organ lines i have heard in many years, coupled with the sheer magnitude of the big breakbeat drums underscored Amanda Davids’ powerful voice perfectly. Then came the organ solo. The sound itself, was warm but gritty, the playing, malevolent but refined – clearly the culmination of many years of listening to the masters, and even studying with one. All i can say is that i highly reccomend buying a copy. Use it for your alarm clock and your cell phone ringtone, because it will get your attention.

The decor at Dazzling on King street was abuzz just the same with it’s pastel cream friezes alight with ethereal but ebulliant colours emanating from stealthily stowed colourful LED lights. I spoke to the promoter of the night, entitled “Sake and Soul”, an energetic guy named “Ace” who exclaimed “this will be good, every single table has been booked.” The house band played on. “Sake and Soul”, a reference to the 70’s soul covers typically twisted by the house band into a modern pallette of mash-ups while patrons dine from a menu of pan-asian fusion dishes has been an ongoing fixture of Toronto’s King street scene for over a year now.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

The most successful drum and bass artists to date include Pendulum, Shy FX, High Contrast, and Black Sun Empire. Because it is a type of dance music, drum and bass can be best appreciated to the fullest extent in clubs and discotheques.
Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

Later, the group had multiple hits from its third and fourth albums, called 19 Naughty III and Poverty’s Paradise respectively. Both albums reached the #1 spot on the R&B/Hip-Hop Charts. “Hip Hop Hooray” was a success from the album 19 Naughty III.

Their first hit as Naughty by Nature was a track called “O.P.P.,” which sampled the Jackson 5’s hit “ABC” and was released in 1991 on their self-titled album Naughty by Nature. The song peaked at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 , making it one of the most successful rap songs in history to that point in terms of crossover success on the pop charts.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

It was poignantly funky. It started with turntables. Then came the guitar – a riff i couldn’t stop singing for the rest of the night. The unique take on a typical blues call and response peppered with some of the slickest organ lines i have heard in many years, coupled with the sheer magnitude of the big breakbeat drums underscored Amanda Davids’ powerful voice perfectly. Then came the organ solo. The sound itself, was warm but gritty, the playing, malevolent but refined – clearly the culmination of many years of listening to the masters, and even studying with one. All i can say is that i highly reccomend buying a copy. Use it for your alarm clock and your cell phone ringtone, because it will get your attention.

The decor at Dazzling on King street was abuzz just the same with it’s pastel cream friezes alight with ethereal but ebulliant colours emanating from stealthily stowed colourful LED lights. I spoke to the promoter of the night, entitled “Sake and Soul”, an energetic guy named “Ace” who exclaimed “this will be good, every single table has been booked.” The house band played on. “Sake and Soul”, a reference to the 70’s soul covers typically twisted by the house band into a modern pallette of mash-ups while patrons dine from a menu of pan-asian fusion dishes has been an ongoing fixture of Toronto’s King street scene for over a year now.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.

The most successful drum and bass artists to date include Pendulum, Shy FX, High Contrast, and Black Sun Empire. Because it is a type of dance music, drum and bass can be best appreciated to the fullest extent in clubs and discotheques.
Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

Later, the group had multiple hits from its third and fourth albums, called 19 Naughty III and Poverty’s Paradise respectively. Both albums reached the #1 spot on the R&B/Hip-Hop Charts. “Hip Hop Hooray” was a success from the album 19 Naughty III.

Their first hit as Naughty by Nature was a track called “O.P.P.,” which sampled the Jackson 5’s hit “ABC” and was released in 1991 on their self-titled album Naughty by Nature. The song peaked at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 , making it one of the most successful rap songs in history to that point in terms of crossover success on the pop charts.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

It was poignantly funky. It started with turntables. Then came the guitar – a riff i couldn’t stop singing for the rest of the night. The unique take on a typical blues call and response peppered with some of the slickest organ lines i have heard in many years, coupled with the sheer magnitude of the big breakbeat drums underscored Amanda Davids’ powerful voice perfectly. Then came the organ solo. The sound itself, was warm but gritty, the playing, malevolent but refined – clearly the culmination of many years of listening to the masters, and even studying with one. All i can say is that i highly reccomend buying a copy. Use it for your alarm clock and your cell phone ringtone, because it will get your attention.

The decor at Dazzling on King street was abuzz just the same with it’s pastel cream friezes alight with ethereal but ebulliant colours emanating from stealthily stowed colourful LED lights. I spoke to the promoter of the night, entitled “Sake and Soul”, an energetic guy named “Ace” who exclaimed “this will be good, every single table has been booked.” The house band played on. “Sake and Soul”, a reference to the 70’s soul covers typically twisted by the house band into a modern pallette of mash-ups while patrons dine from a menu of pan-asian fusion dishes has been an ongoing fixture of Toronto’s King street scene for over a year now.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.