G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else. Both albums reached the #1 spot on the R&B/Hip-Hop Charts. “Hip Hop Hooray” was a success from the album 19 Naughty III.
DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York. I told myself when I graduated that I wasn’t gonna get a job, a regular 9-5. I was gonna hustle and try to make my way through the grind of becoming an artist. I got really fortunate actually, with that record. When that came out, Funkmaster Flex was killing it! A lot of people thought he made the record. He was playing it every night for like 2-3 years in a row on the mix show. It was an anthem. It was big record. I was able to use that to get more work. I did a couple more records in that style, that party-breakbeat kind of thing. And then I started getting remixes and production.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

Ashley’s Roach Clip (Chuck Brown and The Soul Searchers) – This sample continues to rock on air. It was notably used in a minor hit known as Girls Around the World by R&B singer Lloyd. Way back in 1987, it found its initial and much-loved use on the classic Paid in Full by Eric B. and Rakim.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.

Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else. Both albums reached the #1 spot on the R&B/Hip-Hop Charts. “Hip Hop Hooray” was a success from the album 19 Naughty III.
DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York. I told myself when I graduated that I wasn’t gonna get a job, a regular 9-5. I was gonna hustle and try to make my way through the grind of becoming an artist. I got really fortunate actually, with that record. When that came out, Funkmaster Flex was killing it! A lot of people thought he made the record. He was playing it every night for like 2-3 years in a row on the mix show. It was an anthem. It was big record. I was able to use that to get more work. I did a couple more records in that style, that party-breakbeat kind of thing. And then I started getting remixes and production.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

Ashley’s Roach Clip (Chuck Brown and The Soul Searchers) – This sample continues to rock on air. It was notably used in a minor hit known as Girls Around the World by R&B singer Lloyd. Way back in 1987, it found its initial and much-loved use on the classic Paid in Full by Eric B. and Rakim.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else. Both albums reached the #1 spot on the R&B/Hip-Hop Charts. “Hip Hop Hooray” was a success from the album 19 Naughty III.
DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York. I told myself when I graduated that I wasn’t gonna get a job, a regular 9-5. I was gonna hustle and try to make my way through the grind of becoming an artist. I got really fortunate actually, with that record. When that came out, Funkmaster Flex was killing it! A lot of people thought he made the record. He was playing it every night for like 2-3 years in a row on the mix show. It was an anthem. It was big record. I was able to use that to get more work. I did a couple more records in that style, that party-breakbeat kind of thing. And then I started getting remixes and production.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

Ashley’s Roach Clip (Chuck Brown and The Soul Searchers) – This sample continues to rock on air. It was notably used in a minor hit known as Girls Around the World by R&B singer Lloyd. Way back in 1987, it found its initial and much-loved use on the classic Paid in Full by Eric B. and Rakim.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.

Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else. Both albums reached the #1 spot on the R&B/Hip-Hop Charts. “Hip Hop Hooray” was a success from the album 19 Naughty III.
DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York. I told myself when I graduated that I wasn’t gonna get a job, a regular 9-5. I was gonna hustle and try to make my way through the grind of becoming an artist. I got really fortunate actually, with that record. When that came out, Funkmaster Flex was killing it! A lot of people thought he made the record. He was playing it every night for like 2-3 years in a row on the mix show. It was an anthem. It was big record. I was able to use that to get more work. I did a couple more records in that style, that party-breakbeat kind of thing. And then I started getting remixes and production.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

The 10 year “scene” from 1990-2000 in Florida certainly went through a decisive change in its course. In 1993 when I was introduced to the whole thing as a definitive “culture” (not just sitting around listening to music), you would get off work at your construction job or whatever, still be wearing your work uniform, and show up at these late night parties, eat an ecstasy pill, and enjoy some good company. Conversation and the “personal journey” seemed more important than anything else.

Ashley’s Roach Clip (Chuck Brown and The Soul Searchers) – This sample continues to rock on air. It was notably used in a minor hit known as Girls Around the World by R&B singer Lloyd. Way back in 1987, it found its initial and much-loved use on the classic Paid in Full by Eric B. and Rakim.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.