G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

Later on I was able to get my hands on a Roland XP-60 Workstation and a Roland MV-8000 Sampler/Sequencer. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. I got really fortunate actually, with that record.
First off you will need some type of program, whether that is software or hardware to create the beats. In my experience of over 20 years with making beats i have used both pieces – hardware and software. I still use both today.

Around breakbeat Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Given the nature of EOTO’s live shows, do the masters of musical improvisation feel pressure to top the last show or enjoy the freedom to explore uncharted territory? Without hesitation, Hann stated that they find the inventiveness exhilarating.

Ensure that the samples you choose will suit your style. Thus, it is very important that you keep listening to a variety of samples in order to know how each would sound. Remember, you have to express the mood you want to suggest and the emotions you want to convey on your song.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.

Later on I was able to get my hands on a Roland XP-60 Workstation and a Roland MV-8000 Sampler/Sequencer. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. I got really fortunate actually, with that record.
First off you will need some type of program, whether that is software or hardware to create the beats. In my experience of over 20 years with making beats i have used both pieces – hardware and software. I still use both today.

Around breakbeat Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Given the nature of EOTO’s live shows, do the masters of musical improvisation feel pressure to top the last show or enjoy the freedom to explore uncharted territory? Without hesitation, Hann stated that they find the inventiveness exhilarating.

Ensure that the samples you choose will suit your style. Thus, it is very important that you keep listening to a variety of samples in order to know how each would sound. Remember, you have to express the mood you want to suggest and the emotions you want to convey on your song.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

Later on I was able to get my hands on a Roland XP-60 Workstation and a Roland MV-8000 Sampler/Sequencer. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. I got really fortunate actually, with that record.
First off you will need some type of program, whether that is software or hardware to create the beats. In my experience of over 20 years with making beats i have used both pieces – hardware and software. I still use both today.

Around breakbeat Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Given the nature of EOTO’s live shows, do the masters of musical improvisation feel pressure to top the last show or enjoy the freedom to explore uncharted territory? Without hesitation, Hann stated that they find the inventiveness exhilarating.

Ensure that the samples you choose will suit your style. Thus, it is very important that you keep listening to a variety of samples in order to know how each would sound. Remember, you have to express the mood you want to suggest and the emotions you want to convey on your song.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.

Later on I was able to get my hands on a Roland XP-60 Workstation and a Roland MV-8000 Sampler/Sequencer. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. I got really fortunate actually, with that record.
First off you will need some type of program, whether that is software or hardware to create the beats. In my experience of over 20 years with making beats i have used both pieces – hardware and software. I still use both today.

Around breakbeat Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Given the nature of EOTO’s live shows, do the masters of musical improvisation feel pressure to top the last show or enjoy the freedom to explore uncharted territory? Without hesitation, Hann stated that they find the inventiveness exhilarating.

Ensure that the samples you choose will suit your style. Thus, it is very important that you keep listening to a variety of samples in order to know how each would sound. Remember, you have to express the mood you want to suggest and the emotions you want to convey on your song.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.