G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

This has become popular to knock over and was significantly used to build the basis of hip hop. So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. It should be an interesting show, as each of the three bands brings a wholly different sound.
After all, some fans prefer artists that stick to a tried and true concert formula, playing a tune live that is indistinguishable from the studio version. Other fans want something a little more diverse. Bands that play a different set list every night, for instance.

Ashley’s Roach Clip (Chuck Brown and The Soul Searchers) – This sample continues to rock on air. It was notably used in a minor hit known as Girls Around the World by R&B singer Lloyd. Way back in 1987, it found its initial and much-loved use on the classic Paid in Full by Eric B. and Rakim.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York. I told myself when I graduated that I wasn’t gonna get a job, a regular 9-5. I was gonna hustle and try to make my way through the grind of becoming an artist. I got really fortunate actually, with that record. When that came out, Funkmaster Flex was killing it! A lot of people thought he made the record. He was playing it every night for like 2-3 years in a row on the mix show. It was an anthem. It was big record. I was able to use that to get more work. I did a couple more records in that style, that party-breakbeat kind of thing. And then I started getting remixes and production.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

The decor at Dazzling on King street was abuzz just the same with it’s pastel cream friezes alight with ethereal but ebulliant colours emanating from stealthily stowed colourful LED lights. I spoke to the promoter of the night, entitled “Sake and Soul”, an energetic guy named “Ace” who exclaimed “this will be good, every single table has been booked.” The house band played on. “Sake and Soul”, a reference to the 70’s soul covers typically twisted by the house band into a modern pallette of mash-ups while patrons dine from a menu of pan-asian fusion dishes has been an ongoing fixture of Toronto’s King street scene for over a year now.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.

This has become popular to knock over and was significantly used to build the basis of hip hop. So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. It should be an interesting show, as each of the three bands brings a wholly different sound.
After all, some fans prefer artists that stick to a tried and true concert formula, playing a tune live that is indistinguishable from the studio version. Other fans want something a little more diverse. Bands that play a different set list every night, for instance.

Ashley’s Roach Clip (Chuck Brown and The Soul Searchers) – This sample continues to rock on air. It was notably used in a minor hit known as Girls Around the World by R&B singer Lloyd. Way back in 1987, it found its initial and much-loved use on the classic Paid in Full by Eric B. and Rakim.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York. I told myself when I graduated that I wasn’t gonna get a job, a regular 9-5. I was gonna hustle and try to make my way through the grind of becoming an artist. I got really fortunate actually, with that record. When that came out, Funkmaster Flex was killing it! A lot of people thought he made the record. He was playing it every night for like 2-3 years in a row on the mix show. It was an anthem. It was big record. I was able to use that to get more work. I did a couple more records in that style, that party-breakbeat kind of thing. And then I started getting remixes and production.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

The decor at Dazzling on King street was abuzz just the same with it’s pastel cream friezes alight with ethereal but ebulliant colours emanating from stealthily stowed colourful LED lights. I spoke to the promoter of the night, entitled “Sake and Soul”, an energetic guy named “Ace” who exclaimed “this will be good, every single table has been booked.” The house band played on. “Sake and Soul”, a reference to the 70’s soul covers typically twisted by the house band into a modern pallette of mash-ups while patrons dine from a menu of pan-asian fusion dishes has been an ongoing fixture of Toronto’s King street scene for over a year now.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

This has become popular to knock over and was significantly used to build the basis of hip hop. So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. It should be an interesting show, as each of the three bands brings a wholly different sound.
After all, some fans prefer artists that stick to a tried and true concert formula, playing a tune live that is indistinguishable from the studio version. Other fans want something a little more diverse. Bands that play a different set list every night, for instance.

Ashley’s Roach Clip (Chuck Brown and The Soul Searchers) – This sample continues to rock on air. It was notably used in a minor hit known as Girls Around the World by R&B singer Lloyd. Way back in 1987, it found its initial and much-loved use on the classic Paid in Full by Eric B. and Rakim.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York. I told myself when I graduated that I wasn’t gonna get a job, a regular 9-5. I was gonna hustle and try to make my way through the grind of becoming an artist. I got really fortunate actually, with that record. When that came out, Funkmaster Flex was killing it! A lot of people thought he made the record. He was playing it every night for like 2-3 years in a row on the mix show. It was an anthem. It was big record. I was able to use that to get more work. I did a couple more records in that style, that party-breakbeat kind of thing. And then I started getting remixes and production.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

The decor at Dazzling on King street was abuzz just the same with it’s pastel cream friezes alight with ethereal but ebulliant colours emanating from stealthily stowed colourful LED lights. I spoke to the promoter of the night, entitled “Sake and Soul”, an energetic guy named “Ace” who exclaimed “this will be good, every single table has been booked.” The house band played on. “Sake and Soul”, a reference to the 70’s soul covers typically twisted by the house band into a modern pallette of mash-ups while patrons dine from a menu of pan-asian fusion dishes has been an ongoing fixture of Toronto’s King street scene for over a year now.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.

This has become popular to knock over and was significantly used to build the basis of hip hop. So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. It should be an interesting show, as each of the three bands brings a wholly different sound.
After all, some fans prefer artists that stick to a tried and true concert formula, playing a tune live that is indistinguishable from the studio version. Other fans want something a little more diverse. Bands that play a different set list every night, for instance.

Ashley’s Roach Clip (Chuck Brown and The Soul Searchers) – This sample continues to rock on air. It was notably used in a minor hit known as Girls Around the World by R&B singer Lloyd. Way back in 1987, it found its initial and much-loved use on the classic Paid in Full by Eric B. and Rakim.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York. I told myself when I graduated that I wasn’t gonna get a job, a regular 9-5. I was gonna hustle and try to make my way through the grind of becoming an artist. I got really fortunate actually, with that record. When that came out, Funkmaster Flex was killing it! A lot of people thought he made the record. He was playing it every night for like 2-3 years in a row on the mix show. It was an anthem. It was big record. I was able to use that to get more work. I did a couple more records in that style, that party-breakbeat kind of thing. And then I started getting remixes and production.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

The decor at Dazzling on King street was abuzz just the same with it’s pastel cream friezes alight with ethereal but ebulliant colours emanating from stealthily stowed colourful LED lights. I spoke to the promoter of the night, entitled “Sake and Soul”, an energetic guy named “Ace” who exclaimed “this will be good, every single table has been booked.” The house band played on. “Sake and Soul”, a reference to the 70’s soul covers typically twisted by the house band into a modern pallette of mash-ups while patrons dine from a menu of pan-asian fusion dishes has been an ongoing fixture of Toronto’s King street scene for over a year now.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.