G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. I got really fortunate actually, with that record.
When hip hop was nearly beginning, it was very much compulsory to keep a compilation of samples and drum breaks. But as time passes by, the use of the same songs repeatedly became less indispensable because of the modern sampling technology and the overture of live instrumentation.

DJ Zany is well-known as a veteran Dj, with huge experience of ten years at the producing and performing in the showbusiness industry. Audience appreciated if a DJ played more than one styles despite of hammering away in the same tone. In the career of Zany, progress and innovation are two key words.

Drum and bass branched off from breakbeat the rave scene during the s and since then multiple elements have been incorporated into it. Jazz, rock, trance, metal, house, hip hop, and many other genres fused into the bass beats to give each track a unique feel.

It was the culmination of a formula I have been working on over my last few mixes. The ultimate goal was to make a mix where there is little or no “down time”. Using 15 tracks with 14 different a capellas I try to keep the energy up and the flow congruent through careful selection and placement of said a capellas.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

I guess at the forefront of the underground “religious” movement, was the band “Rabbit in The Moon.” Even in the two, very short conversations I had with Monk in the 90s, it was obvious that they knew they were doing something completely different. Somehow, Rabbit were able to meld the chainsaws and death/destruction of the previous Goth scene with the late-night Rave scene. Their dark/ethereal show, combined with dark/trancy breaks-seemed to tell a story- and in that story- seemed to be hidden references to this “Raver religion.” Once, at a 4AM outdoor show, during a 3 day festival in Gainesville- Confucius even spoke of a hidden religion of some sort.

Throbbing bass and thudding beats are the signatures of the venture from Travis and Hann, born out of their shared love of electronic dance music. The project started out as an avenue for the long time friends to blow off steam and generally just have a good time playing around with technology and music.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. I got really fortunate actually, with that record.
When hip hop was nearly beginning, it was very much compulsory to keep a compilation of samples and drum breaks. But as time passes by, the use of the same songs repeatedly became less indispensable because of the modern sampling technology and the overture of live instrumentation.

DJ Zany is well-known as a veteran Dj, with huge experience of ten years at the producing and performing in the showbusiness industry. Audience appreciated if a DJ played more than one styles despite of hammering away in the same tone. In the career of Zany, progress and innovation are two key words.

Drum and bass branched off from breakbeat the rave scene during the s and since then multiple elements have been incorporated into it. Jazz, rock, trance, metal, house, hip hop, and many other genres fused into the bass beats to give each track a unique feel.

It was the culmination of a formula I have been working on over my last few mixes. The ultimate goal was to make a mix where there is little or no “down time”. Using 15 tracks with 14 different a capellas I try to keep the energy up and the flow congruent through careful selection and placement of said a capellas.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

I guess at the forefront of the underground “religious” movement, was the band “Rabbit in The Moon.” Even in the two, very short conversations I had with Monk in the 90s, it was obvious that they knew they were doing something completely different. Somehow, Rabbit were able to meld the chainsaws and death/destruction of the previous Goth scene with the late-night Rave scene. Their dark/ethereal show, combined with dark/trancy breaks-seemed to tell a story- and in that story- seemed to be hidden references to this “Raver religion.” Once, at a 4AM outdoor show, during a 3 day festival in Gainesville- Confucius even spoke of a hidden religion of some sort.

Throbbing bass and thudding beats are the signatures of the venture from Travis and Hann, born out of their shared love of electronic dance music. The project started out as an avenue for the long time friends to blow off steam and generally just have a good time playing around with technology and music.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. I got really fortunate actually, with that record.
When hip hop was nearly beginning, it was very much compulsory to keep a compilation of samples and drum breaks. But as time passes by, the use of the same songs repeatedly became less indispensable because of the modern sampling technology and the overture of live instrumentation.

DJ Zany is well-known as a veteran Dj, with huge experience of ten years at the producing and performing in the showbusiness industry. Audience appreciated if a DJ played more than one styles despite of hammering away in the same tone. In the career of Zany, progress and innovation are two key words.

Drum and bass branched off from breakbeat the rave scene during the s and since then multiple elements have been incorporated into it. Jazz, rock, trance, metal, house, hip hop, and many other genres fused into the bass beats to give each track a unique feel.

It was the culmination of a formula I have been working on over my last few mixes. The ultimate goal was to make a mix where there is little or no “down time”. Using 15 tracks with 14 different a capellas I try to keep the energy up and the flow congruent through careful selection and placement of said a capellas.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

I guess at the forefront of the underground “religious” movement, was the band “Rabbit in The Moon.” Even in the two, very short conversations I had with Monk in the 90s, it was obvious that they knew they were doing something completely different. Somehow, Rabbit were able to meld the chainsaws and death/destruction of the previous Goth scene with the late-night Rave scene. Their dark/ethereal show, combined with dark/trancy breaks-seemed to tell a story- and in that story- seemed to be hidden references to this “Raver religion.” Once, at a 4AM outdoor show, during a 3 day festival in Gainesville- Confucius even spoke of a hidden religion of some sort.

Throbbing bass and thudding beats are the signatures of the venture from Travis and Hann, born out of their shared love of electronic dance music. The project started out as an avenue for the long time friends to blow off steam and generally just have a good time playing around with technology and music.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. I got really fortunate actually, with that record.
When hip hop was nearly beginning, it was very much compulsory to keep a compilation of samples and drum breaks. But as time passes by, the use of the same songs repeatedly became less indispensable because of the modern sampling technology and the overture of live instrumentation.

DJ Zany is well-known as a veteran Dj, with huge experience of ten years at the producing and performing in the showbusiness industry. Audience appreciated if a DJ played more than one styles despite of hammering away in the same tone. In the career of Zany, progress and innovation are two key words.

Drum and bass branched off from breakbeat the rave scene during the s and since then multiple elements have been incorporated into it. Jazz, rock, trance, metal, house, hip hop, and many other genres fused into the bass beats to give each track a unique feel.

It was the culmination of a formula I have been working on over my last few mixes. The ultimate goal was to make a mix where there is little or no “down time”. Using 15 tracks with 14 different a capellas I try to keep the energy up and the flow congruent through careful selection and placement of said a capellas.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

I guess at the forefront of the underground “religious” movement, was the band “Rabbit in The Moon.” Even in the two, very short conversations I had with Monk in the 90s, it was obvious that they knew they were doing something completely different. Somehow, Rabbit were able to meld the chainsaws and death/destruction of the previous Goth scene with the late-night Rave scene. Their dark/ethereal show, combined with dark/trancy breaks-seemed to tell a story- and in that story- seemed to be hidden references to this “Raver religion.” Once, at a 4AM outdoor show, during a 3 day festival in Gainesville- Confucius even spoke of a hidden religion of some sort.

Throbbing bass and thudding beats are the signatures of the venture from Travis and Hann, born out of their shared love of electronic dance music. The project started out as an avenue for the long time friends to blow off steam and generally just have a good time playing around with technology and music.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.