G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. When hip hop was nearly beginning, it was very much compulsory to keep a compilation of samples and drum breaks.
It’s sleazin’ season in Sacramento this weekend as we’ve got a greased up rock and roll festival called “Midnight Mass” (sacrilege, you heathens!) and a group of gals that used to be jailbait performing downtown – perhaps as a reminder to us late-twenty and early-thirty somethings that it doesn’t all have to be Saturdays at Home Depot just yet.

I am happiest with the response and how many people have been inspired by it. Hearing I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your breakbeat CD is really what it is all about for me. I think that if you can open up someone to your genre, then you have done your job perfectly and possibly made a new fan.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

Impeach The President (The Honey Drippers) – This seemed to be preferred mostly by everyone to sample it rather than remake it. This was not only famously used in hip hop, but also in R&B and other genres. Several hip hop songs have sampled this that include Mr. Loveman by Shaggy, Bitch by Meredith Brooks, and Janet Jackson’s That’s The Way Love Goes.

To compare the “Rave” scene in the 90s to the “Hippie” movement is a misnomer. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand. The motive, of course.end the Vietnam War. In the meantime, of course.get as fucked up as you could, while having free-love sex with as many partners as you could physically handle.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. When hip hop was nearly beginning, it was very much compulsory to keep a compilation of samples and drum breaks.
It’s sleazin’ season in Sacramento this weekend as we’ve got a greased up rock and roll festival called “Midnight Mass” (sacrilege, you heathens!) and a group of gals that used to be jailbait performing downtown – perhaps as a reminder to us late-twenty and early-thirty somethings that it doesn’t all have to be Saturdays at Home Depot just yet.

I am happiest with the response and how many people have been inspired by it. Hearing I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your breakbeat CD is really what it is all about for me. I think that if you can open up someone to your genre, then you have done your job perfectly and possibly made a new fan.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

Impeach The President (The Honey Drippers) – This seemed to be preferred mostly by everyone to sample it rather than remake it. This was not only famously used in hip hop, but also in R&B and other genres. Several hip hop songs have sampled this that include Mr. Loveman by Shaggy, Bitch by Meredith Brooks, and Janet Jackson’s That’s The Way Love Goes.

To compare the “Rave” scene in the 90s to the “Hippie” movement is a misnomer. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand. The motive, of course.end the Vietnam War. In the meantime, of course.get as fucked up as you could, while having free-love sex with as many partners as you could physically handle.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. When hip hop was nearly beginning, it was very much compulsory to keep a compilation of samples and drum breaks.
It’s sleazin’ season in Sacramento this weekend as we’ve got a greased up rock and roll festival called “Midnight Mass” (sacrilege, you heathens!) and a group of gals that used to be jailbait performing downtown – perhaps as a reminder to us late-twenty and early-thirty somethings that it doesn’t all have to be Saturdays at Home Depot just yet.

I am happiest with the response and how many people have been inspired by it. Hearing I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your breakbeat CD is really what it is all about for me. I think that if you can open up someone to your genre, then you have done your job perfectly and possibly made a new fan.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

Impeach The President (The Honey Drippers) – This seemed to be preferred mostly by everyone to sample it rather than remake it. This was not only famously used in hip hop, but also in R&B and other genres. Several hip hop songs have sampled this that include Mr. Loveman by Shaggy, Bitch by Meredith Brooks, and Janet Jackson’s That’s The Way Love Goes.

To compare the “Rave” scene in the 90s to the “Hippie” movement is a misnomer. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand. The motive, of course.end the Vietnam War. In the meantime, of course.get as fucked up as you could, while having free-love sex with as many partners as you could physically handle.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. When hip hop was nearly beginning, it was very much compulsory to keep a compilation of samples and drum breaks.
It’s sleazin’ season in Sacramento this weekend as we’ve got a greased up rock and roll festival called “Midnight Mass” (sacrilege, you heathens!) and a group of gals that used to be jailbait performing downtown – perhaps as a reminder to us late-twenty and early-thirty somethings that it doesn’t all have to be Saturdays at Home Depot just yet.

I am happiest with the response and how many people have been inspired by it. Hearing I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your breakbeat CD is really what it is all about for me. I think that if you can open up someone to your genre, then you have done your job perfectly and possibly made a new fan.

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

Impeach The President (The Honey Drippers) – This seemed to be preferred mostly by everyone to sample it rather than remake it. This was not only famously used in hip hop, but also in R&B and other genres. Several hip hop songs have sampled this that include Mr. Loveman by Shaggy, Bitch by Meredith Brooks, and Janet Jackson’s That’s The Way Love Goes.

To compare the “Rave” scene in the 90s to the “Hippie” movement is a misnomer. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand. The motive, of course.end the Vietnam War. In the meantime, of course.get as fucked up as you could, while having free-love sex with as many partners as you could physically handle.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.