G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

Ensure that the samples you choose will suit your style. NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show.
Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Examiner You definitely came to be a breakbeat figurehead in the late-90s underground boom in New York. Can you tell me what types of things you thought really made that scene special, really made it something like a movement?

The bassline in drum and bass plays half of the speed of the drums. The changing of this equation produces “faster” and “slower” sounding tracks. Guitar riffs and extra beats are added and the BPMs are made higher to alter the sound of the song. Since 1996, tracks have remained in the mid-170 BPM range, producing what we know today as drum and bass.

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.

Ensure that the samples you choose will suit your style. NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show.
Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Examiner You definitely came to be a breakbeat figurehead in the late-90s underground boom in New York. Can you tell me what types of things you thought really made that scene special, really made it something like a movement?

The bassline in drum and bass plays half of the speed of the drums. The changing of this equation produces “faster” and “slower” sounding tracks. Guitar riffs and extra beats are added and the BPMs are made higher to alter the sound of the song. Since 1996, tracks have remained in the mid-170 BPM range, producing what we know today as drum and bass.

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

G.O.O.D. Music Cypher From Bet Hip Hop Awards

Ensure that the samples you choose will suit your style. NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show.
Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Examiner You definitely came to be a breakbeat figurehead in the late-90s underground boom in New York. Can you tell me what types of things you thought really made that scene special, really made it something like a movement?

The bassline in drum and bass plays half of the speed of the drums. The changing of this equation produces “faster” and “slower” sounding tracks. Guitar riffs and extra beats are added and the BPMs are made higher to alter the sound of the song. Since 1996, tracks have remained in the mid-170 BPM range, producing what we know today as drum and bass.

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.

Ensure that the samples you choose will suit your style. NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show.
Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Examiner You definitely came to be a breakbeat figurehead in the late-90s underground boom in New York. Can you tell me what types of things you thought really made that scene special, really made it something like a movement?

The bassline in drum and bass plays half of the speed of the drums. The changing of this equation produces “faster” and “slower” sounding tracks. Guitar riffs and extra beats are added and the BPMs are made higher to alter the sound of the song. Since 1996, tracks have remained in the mid-170 BPM range, producing what we know today as drum and bass.

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.