Hardstyle Music Festival - Deqon

Hardstyle Music Festival – Deqon

In the South Africa field Defqon 2011 Hardstyle incorporates a kick drums popping sounds combination of the hard-hitting low. Always check the format of the song you want to sample. There are lots of other music genres some of which are well-known.

The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

What really set things off on the underground was my group Jigmastas and Beyond Real, the single that we had out, starting the label, and working with people like J-Live, Mr. Complex, etc. etc. So I would say ’95 was the year that really started things off. I also had–my first remix was “Microphone Master” by Das EFX and “Stakes Is High” by De La Soul. I did two MC Eiht remixes. And that was it. That was the starting point.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when breakbeat using Hardware.

December 31, 1999. New Year’s Eve party at New Energy in York, Pennsylvania. Definitely makes it easy to remember with it being on such a monumental New Year’s Eve.

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.

In the South Africa field Defqon 2011 Hardstyle incorporates a kick drums popping sounds combination of the hard-hitting low. Always check the format of the song you want to sample. There are lots of other music genres some of which are well-known.

The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

What really set things off on the underground was my group Jigmastas and Beyond Real, the single that we had out, starting the label, and working with people like J-Live, Mr. Complex, etc. etc. So I would say ’95 was the year that really started things off. I also had–my first remix was “Microphone Master” by Das EFX and “Stakes Is High” by De La Soul. I did two MC Eiht remixes. And that was it. That was the starting point.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when breakbeat using Hardware.

December 31, 1999. New Year’s Eve party at New Energy in York, Pennsylvania. Definitely makes it easy to remember with it being on such a monumental New Year’s Eve.

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.

Hardstyle Music Festival - Deqon

Hardstyle Music Festival – Deqon

In the South Africa field Defqon 2011 Hardstyle incorporates a kick drums popping sounds combination of the hard-hitting low. Always check the format of the song you want to sample. There are lots of other music genres some of which are well-known.

The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

What really set things off on the underground was my group Jigmastas and Beyond Real, the single that we had out, starting the label, and working with people like J-Live, Mr. Complex, etc. etc. So I would say ’95 was the year that really started things off. I also had–my first remix was “Microphone Master” by Das EFX and “Stakes Is High” by De La Soul. I did two MC Eiht remixes. And that was it. That was the starting point.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when breakbeat using Hardware.

December 31, 1999. New Year’s Eve party at New Energy in York, Pennsylvania. Definitely makes it easy to remember with it being on such a monumental New Year’s Eve.

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.

In the South Africa field Defqon 2011 Hardstyle incorporates a kick drums popping sounds combination of the hard-hitting low. Always check the format of the song you want to sample. There are lots of other music genres some of which are well-known.

The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

What really set things off on the underground was my group Jigmastas and Beyond Real, the single that we had out, starting the label, and working with people like J-Live, Mr. Complex, etc. etc. So I would say ’95 was the year that really started things off. I also had–my first remix was “Microphone Master” by Das EFX and “Stakes Is High” by De La Soul. I did two MC Eiht remixes. And that was it. That was the starting point.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when breakbeat using Hardware.

December 31, 1999. New Year’s Eve party at New Energy in York, Pennsylvania. Definitely makes it easy to remember with it being on such a monumental New Year’s Eve.

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.