Hardstyle Music Festival - Deqon

Hardstyle Music Festival – Deqon

The sound of it has been generally called a four to the floor kick beat and bass line with off-beat grabber style. Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention.
Recently, the genre has started becoming more popular with youth around the world thanks to the internet revolution. Drum and bass is synonymous to jungle, a type of electronic dance music which can be identified by its fast tempo and broken beat drums. The bass is also very heavy. Though today it is still underground, it is slowly surfacing and making its way into youth culture, especially in the UK, where it originated.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

The sound of it has been generally called a four to the floor kick beat and bass line with off-beat grabber style. Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention.
Recently, the genre has started becoming more popular with youth around the world thanks to the internet revolution. Drum and bass is synonymous to jungle, a type of electronic dance music which can be identified by its fast tempo and broken beat drums. The bass is also very heavy. Though today it is still underground, it is slowly surfacing and making its way into youth culture, especially in the UK, where it originated.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

Hardstyle Music Festival - Deqon

Hardstyle Music Festival – Deqon

The sound of it has been generally called a four to the floor kick beat and bass line with off-beat grabber style. Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention.
Recently, the genre has started becoming more popular with youth around the world thanks to the internet revolution. Drum and bass is synonymous to jungle, a type of electronic dance music which can be identified by its fast tempo and broken beat drums. The bass is also very heavy. Though today it is still underground, it is slowly surfacing and making its way into youth culture, especially in the UK, where it originated.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

The sound of it has been generally called a four to the floor kick beat and bass line with off-beat grabber style. Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention.
Recently, the genre has started becoming more popular with youth around the world thanks to the internet revolution. Drum and bass is synonymous to jungle, a type of electronic dance music which can be identified by its fast tempo and broken beat drums. The bass is also very heavy. Though today it is still underground, it is slowly surfacing and making its way into youth culture, especially in the UK, where it originated.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.