Hardstyle Music Festival - Deqon

Hardstyle Music Festival – Deqon

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix.

Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

It was the culmination of a formula I have been working on over my last few mixes. The ultimate goal was to make a mix where there is little or no “down time”. Using 15 tracks with 14 different a capellas I try to keep the energy up and the flow congruent through careful selection and placement of said a capellas.

First, Frantic Clam, Rook, and Condiment Sandwich will be playing at Flamingo Cantina tonight (Do512 link). It should be an interesting show, as each of the three bands brings a wholly different sound. Frantic Clam exudes indie rock with a hint of glam while Rook falls more into Flamingo Cantina’s niche of reggae-rock. Condiment Sandwich brings forward breakbeat jazz with a touch of hip-hop. For 5 dollars, you won’t see a more diverse, talented group of bands tonight.

What really set things off on the underground was my group Jigmastas and Beyond Real, the single that we had out, starting the label, and working with people like J-Live, Mr. Complex, etc. etc. So I would say ’95 was the year that really started things off. I also had–my first remix was “Microphone Master” by Das EFX and “Stakes Is High” by De La Soul. I did two MC Eiht remixes. And that was it. That was the starting point.

There were occasions of “mass hallucinations”- things felt and seen by multitudes of different folks on different drugs- some even sober (granted, not many). The music itself seemed to have a hallucinogenic power- and if you could create a beautiful painting with your music- you would literally become a “God” in the scene.

It didn’t take long before the scene developed it’s own “work uniform.” Designer sweat pants, visors, and T-Shirts hit the late scene in swarms. By 2005, Ravers were creating their own clothing lines-many going on to gain national markets. You still wore your “work uniform” to the parties, but now it was your “SCENE uniform.” Gone were the days of getting off work at the convenience store and coming straight in to the club. NOW, you went out of your way to look the part, covering yourself in Raver gear like Split, Alien Workshop, and even some national brands that had gotten involved (Puma, Adidas, etc).Those who didn’t have the gear would become “shunned.” The scene that originated as welcoming all, where everyone could be themselves, had changed. And the people changed- to FIT the scene.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix.

Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

It was the culmination of a formula I have been working on over my last few mixes. The ultimate goal was to make a mix where there is little or no “down time”. Using 15 tracks with 14 different a capellas I try to keep the energy up and the flow congruent through careful selection and placement of said a capellas.

First, Frantic Clam, Rook, and Condiment Sandwich will be playing at Flamingo Cantina tonight (Do512 link). It should be an interesting show, as each of the three bands brings a wholly different sound. Frantic Clam exudes indie rock with a hint of glam while Rook falls more into Flamingo Cantina’s niche of reggae-rock. Condiment Sandwich brings forward breakbeat jazz with a touch of hip-hop. For 5 dollars, you won’t see a more diverse, talented group of bands tonight.

What really set things off on the underground was my group Jigmastas and Beyond Real, the single that we had out, starting the label, and working with people like J-Live, Mr. Complex, etc. etc. So I would say ’95 was the year that really started things off. I also had–my first remix was “Microphone Master” by Das EFX and “Stakes Is High” by De La Soul. I did two MC Eiht remixes. And that was it. That was the starting point.

There were occasions of “mass hallucinations”- things felt and seen by multitudes of different folks on different drugs- some even sober (granted, not many). The music itself seemed to have a hallucinogenic power- and if you could create a beautiful painting with your music- you would literally become a “God” in the scene.

It didn’t take long before the scene developed it’s own “work uniform.” Designer sweat pants, visors, and T-Shirts hit the late scene in swarms. By 2005, Ravers were creating their own clothing lines-many going on to gain national markets. You still wore your “work uniform” to the parties, but now it was your “SCENE uniform.” Gone were the days of getting off work at the convenience store and coming straight in to the club. NOW, you went out of your way to look the part, covering yourself in Raver gear like Split, Alien Workshop, and even some national brands that had gotten involved (Puma, Adidas, etc).Those who didn’t have the gear would become “shunned.” The scene that originated as welcoming all, where everyone could be themselves, had changed. And the people changed- to FIT the scene.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.

Hardstyle Music Festival - Deqon

Hardstyle Music Festival – Deqon

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix.

Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

It was the culmination of a formula I have been working on over my last few mixes. The ultimate goal was to make a mix where there is little or no “down time”. Using 15 tracks with 14 different a capellas I try to keep the energy up and the flow congruent through careful selection and placement of said a capellas.

First, Frantic Clam, Rook, and Condiment Sandwich will be playing at Flamingo Cantina tonight (Do512 link). It should be an interesting show, as each of the three bands brings a wholly different sound. Frantic Clam exudes indie rock with a hint of glam while Rook falls more into Flamingo Cantina’s niche of reggae-rock. Condiment Sandwich brings forward breakbeat jazz with a touch of hip-hop. For 5 dollars, you won’t see a more diverse, talented group of bands tonight.

What really set things off on the underground was my group Jigmastas and Beyond Real, the single that we had out, starting the label, and working with people like J-Live, Mr. Complex, etc. etc. So I would say ’95 was the year that really started things off. I also had–my first remix was “Microphone Master” by Das EFX and “Stakes Is High” by De La Soul. I did two MC Eiht remixes. And that was it. That was the starting point.

There were occasions of “mass hallucinations”- things felt and seen by multitudes of different folks on different drugs- some even sober (granted, not many). The music itself seemed to have a hallucinogenic power- and if you could create a beautiful painting with your music- you would literally become a “God” in the scene.

It didn’t take long before the scene developed it’s own “work uniform.” Designer sweat pants, visors, and T-Shirts hit the late scene in swarms. By 2005, Ravers were creating their own clothing lines-many going on to gain national markets. You still wore your “work uniform” to the parties, but now it was your “SCENE uniform.” Gone were the days of getting off work at the convenience store and coming straight in to the club. NOW, you went out of your way to look the part, covering yourself in Raver gear like Split, Alien Workshop, and even some national brands that had gotten involved (Puma, Adidas, etc).Those who didn’t have the gear would become “shunned.” The scene that originated as welcoming all, where everyone could be themselves, had changed. And the people changed- to FIT the scene.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix.

Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

It was the culmination of a formula I have been working on over my last few mixes. The ultimate goal was to make a mix where there is little or no “down time”. Using 15 tracks with 14 different a capellas I try to keep the energy up and the flow congruent through careful selection and placement of said a capellas.

First, Frantic Clam, Rook, and Condiment Sandwich will be playing at Flamingo Cantina tonight (Do512 link). It should be an interesting show, as each of the three bands brings a wholly different sound. Frantic Clam exudes indie rock with a hint of glam while Rook falls more into Flamingo Cantina’s niche of reggae-rock. Condiment Sandwich brings forward breakbeat jazz with a touch of hip-hop. For 5 dollars, you won’t see a more diverse, talented group of bands tonight.

What really set things off on the underground was my group Jigmastas and Beyond Real, the single that we had out, starting the label, and working with people like J-Live, Mr. Complex, etc. etc. So I would say ’95 was the year that really started things off. I also had–my first remix was “Microphone Master” by Das EFX and “Stakes Is High” by De La Soul. I did two MC Eiht remixes. And that was it. That was the starting point.

There were occasions of “mass hallucinations”- things felt and seen by multitudes of different folks on different drugs- some even sober (granted, not many). The music itself seemed to have a hallucinogenic power- and if you could create a beautiful painting with your music- you would literally become a “God” in the scene.

It didn’t take long before the scene developed it’s own “work uniform.” Designer sweat pants, visors, and T-Shirts hit the late scene in swarms. By 2005, Ravers were creating their own clothing lines-many going on to gain national markets. You still wore your “work uniform” to the parties, but now it was your “SCENE uniform.” Gone were the days of getting off work at the convenience store and coming straight in to the club. NOW, you went out of your way to look the part, covering yourself in Raver gear like Split, Alien Workshop, and even some national brands that had gotten involved (Puma, Adidas, etc).Those who didn’t have the gear would become “shunned.” The scene that originated as welcoming all, where everyone could be themselves, had changed. And the people changed- to FIT the scene.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.