Hardstyle Music Festival - Deqon

Hardstyle Music Festival – Deqon

I got really fortunate actually, with that record. Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Always check the format of the song you want to sample.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

To compare the “Rave” scene in the 90s to the “Hippie” movement is a misnomer. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand. The motive, of course.end the Vietnam War. In the meantime, of course.get as fucked up as you could, while having free-love sex with as many partners as you could physically handle.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

The group’s M.O. is to take the free-wheeling party vibe of a DJ and push it to the next level by using organic instruments, innovative performance technology, and uncharted musical exploration.

Ready Or Not, Here I Come (The Delfonics) – This music sample was actually made popular by Timberland when he arranged his partner Missy Elliott with the wonderful hit for Sock It 2 Me. This became so hot which turned out to be Missy Elliot’s best work. Da Brat was even invited on it.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

I got really fortunate actually, with that record. Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Always check the format of the song you want to sample.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

To compare the “Rave” scene in the 90s to the “Hippie” movement is a misnomer. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand. The motive, of course.end the Vietnam War. In the meantime, of course.get as fucked up as you could, while having free-love sex with as many partners as you could physically handle.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

The group’s M.O. is to take the free-wheeling party vibe of a DJ and push it to the next level by using organic instruments, innovative performance technology, and uncharted musical exploration.

Ready Or Not, Here I Come (The Delfonics) – This music sample was actually made popular by Timberland when he arranged his partner Missy Elliott with the wonderful hit for Sock It 2 Me. This became so hot which turned out to be Missy Elliot’s best work. Da Brat was even invited on it.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

Hardstyle Music Festival - Deqon

Hardstyle Music Festival – Deqon

I got really fortunate actually, with that record. Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Always check the format of the song you want to sample.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

To compare the “Rave” scene in the 90s to the “Hippie” movement is a misnomer. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand. The motive, of course.end the Vietnam War. In the meantime, of course.get as fucked up as you could, while having free-love sex with as many partners as you could physically handle.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

The group’s M.O. is to take the free-wheeling party vibe of a DJ and push it to the next level by using organic instruments, innovative performance technology, and uncharted musical exploration.

Ready Or Not, Here I Come (The Delfonics) – This music sample was actually made popular by Timberland when he arranged his partner Missy Elliott with the wonderful hit for Sock It 2 Me. This became so hot which turned out to be Missy Elliot’s best work. Da Brat was even invited on it.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

I got really fortunate actually, with that record. Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Always check the format of the song you want to sample.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

To compare the “Rave” scene in the 90s to the “Hippie” movement is a misnomer. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand. The motive, of course.end the Vietnam War. In the meantime, of course.get as fucked up as you could, while having free-love sex with as many partners as you could physically handle.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

The group’s M.O. is to take the free-wheeling party vibe of a DJ and push it to the next level by using organic instruments, innovative performance technology, and uncharted musical exploration.

Ready Or Not, Here I Come (The Delfonics) – This music sample was actually made popular by Timberland when he arranged his partner Missy Elliott with the wonderful hit for Sock It 2 Me. This became so hot which turned out to be Missy Elliot’s best work. Da Brat was even invited on it.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.