Honey Cake - How To Bake A Jewish Tradition

Honey Cake – How To Bake A Jewish Tradition

While the days may still be warm, the nights in September can be chilly. This rendition captures the heart of Chassidic philosophy. Or just make a loaf and create a circle to celebrate Rosh Hashanah.
This Friday is the Jewish New Tear for 2009. Since the Jewish calendar is a luna calendar (the Christian one is based on a solar year) the date for celebration changes each year.

Notably, many of these same adults do not themselves care about whether they marry someone of the same religion, but they won’t stand up and tell their parents that they are not going to pass the super-religious genes onto the next generation. To those people I say: It’s your life!

Serving an Exotic Fruit: One of the traditions of Rosh Hashana is to serve a new fruit, an exotic one that guests have not eaten in the past year. Given that it is September some people may have trouble coming up with a fresh option that guests won’t know. Whatever you choose to serve, consider what you serve it in. A silver tiered serving tray can make a great pre-dinner centerpiece. Especially when it bears many tiered levels of succulent fruits.

So I’m here to ask you to think before you mindlessly wish me a Merry Christmas. I do not celebrate Christmas; I celebrate Hanukkah. I may celebrate something else or I may be an atheist. Let’s embrace all our difference with a generic Happy Holidays and not allow our bosses to fire us if we refuse to say Merry Christmas to customers.

In this holiday season of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur the meaning of the various rituals is called to mind and some may question the length of the service and their significance. There was even a suggestion of doing away with the services entirely and simply celebrating as though it were an ordinary secular New Year. This story calls to mind that the central significance of these holidays are our connection to Hashem and that without that connection we may become lost along the way.

Since everything here is perishable, it must be sent over-night or second day air. They have items like Standing Rib Roast for $10.99/lb, Spring Chicken for $2.89/lb, Veal Cutlets $12.99 per lb and Sliced Nova Lox $9.99 / 8oz.

The Toldot Yaakov Yosef lived in the mid 1700’s. He was one of the foremost disciples of the Ba’al Shem Tov, the founder of the Chassidic movement. His version of this tradition is as follows.

Consider a buffet: Large gatherings are difficult to seat properly in a family home. Most people can’t easily set a table for more than a dozen people and just a few families in attendance makes this task even harder. A buffet style leaves guests free to sit where they like and circulate freely. It also requires some extra serving ware that might need to be purchased. Hot plates and food servers are designed for this task and will keep food from going bad or cold. Large serving dishes can be used for the cold offerings.

While the days may still be warm, the nights in September can be chilly. This rendition captures the heart of Chassidic philosophy. Or just make a loaf and create a circle to celebrate Rosh Hashanah.
This Friday is the Jewish New Tear for 2009. Since the Jewish calendar is a luna calendar (the Christian one is based on a solar year) the date for celebration changes each year.

Notably, many of these same adults do not themselves care about whether they marry someone of the same religion, but they won’t stand up and tell their parents that they are not going to pass the super-religious genes onto the next generation. To those people I say: It’s your life!

Serving an Exotic Fruit: One of the traditions of Rosh Hashana is to serve a new fruit, an exotic one that guests have not eaten in the past year. Given that it is September some people may have trouble coming up with a fresh option that guests won’t know. Whatever you choose to serve, consider what you serve it in. A silver tiered serving tray can make a great pre-dinner centerpiece. Especially when it bears many tiered levels of succulent fruits.

So I’m here to ask you to think before you mindlessly wish me a Merry Christmas. I do not celebrate Christmas; I celebrate Hanukkah. I may celebrate something else or I may be an atheist. Let’s embrace all our difference with a generic Happy Holidays and not allow our bosses to fire us if we refuse to say Merry Christmas to customers.

In this holiday season of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur the meaning of the various rituals is called to mind and some may question the length of the service and their significance. There was even a suggestion of doing away with the services entirely and simply celebrating as though it were an ordinary secular New Year. This story calls to mind that the central significance of these holidays are our connection to Hashem and that without that connection we may become lost along the way.

Since everything here is perishable, it must be sent over-night or second day air. They have items like Standing Rib Roast for $10.99/lb, Spring Chicken for $2.89/lb, Veal Cutlets $12.99 per lb and Sliced Nova Lox $9.99 / 8oz.

The Toldot Yaakov Yosef lived in the mid 1700’s. He was one of the foremost disciples of the Ba’al Shem Tov, the founder of the Chassidic movement. His version of this tradition is as follows.

Consider a buffet: Large gatherings are difficult to seat properly in a family home. Most people can’t easily set a table for more than a dozen people and just a few families in attendance makes this task even harder. A buffet style leaves guests free to sit where they like and circulate freely. It also requires some extra serving ware that might need to be purchased. Hot plates and food servers are designed for this task and will keep food from going bad or cold. Large serving dishes can be used for the cold offerings.