How To Make Perfect Honey Cake For Rosh Hashanah!

How To Make Perfect Honey Cake For Rosh Hashanah!

He kept them, (Acts 20:6,16; 27:9) and urged us to follow his example, 1Cor 11:1; 5:8. And, like the scribes of old who blotted the ink to “seal it,” we do the same and then close the book. It is said that Sarah gave birth to Isaac on Rosh Hashanah.
Shofar is a traditional, Jewish blowing horn. This horn is usually that of a ram. For ages, this blowing horn has been used in various Jewish rituals and religious ceremonies. Rituals like Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah involves blowing of the shofars. Blowing of the shofars is also widely prevalent in many customs held at synagogues.

The shofar also serves as a symbol of the Jewish people and their covenant with G-d. The call of the shofar represents breath and life. The bend of the horn represents man’s sin. The use of ram’s horn recalls Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his own son as part of his obedience to G-d and G-d’s ultimate offering of the ram as an alternative sacrifice.

Get your children involved. Too often, children aren’t involved in Jewish holiday preparation except Purim, which is a costume-clad holiday with similarities to Halloween. This year, have your children prepare parts of Rosh Hashanah. In the kitchen, they can cut the apples and pour the honey into little cups. Let them rip up a challah for honey-dipping. With supervision, they can braise the brisket.

And we can do the same every day of every year. We can write our own page in the Book of Life today, tomorrow, next week, next month, next year. How do we accomplish this? By reviewing our actions and goals from the last year, noticing where we fell short of achieving our desired outcomes and then setting new targets for the new year. However, we must take another step: We must write on the blank pages of the book by visualizing our new goals in fine detail and feeling exactly what it would be like if we had already manifested these results. In other words, we must imagine the life we want, the behaviors to which we aspire as if they had been published in that book – sealed, already done, accomplished.

A little hole shouldn’t be a problem, right? Glue and plaster will do the trick! Not so fast. Once a shofar has a hole or crack in it, it cannot be mended — it is rendered prohibited on the spot and cannot be used in a synagogue on Rosh Hashana or Yom Kippur.

No matter the amount or work and planning they put into, a wedding is not just about two people. It is about religion, tradition and the joining of two families. Couples should be sensitive to tradition when they plan their nuptials.

And this call goes out to all Christians, not merely priests, bishops and Peter’s successor as pope, “the servant of the servants of God.” Sin, in every expression, is self-centeredness at the expense of others. We must think and speak and act with the same humility, the same emptying of self, that Christ modeled throughout His earthly ministry and all the way to the cross.

In the dining room, let your children create special placeholders for each guest. If you have time and money, take your children to a pottery store to paint their own kiddush cups. You also can buy simple metal goblets from a home store and have your children decorate the stems.

He kept them, (Acts 20:6,16; 27:9) and urged us to follow his example, 1Cor 11:1; 5:8. And, like the scribes of old who blotted the ink to “seal it,” we do the same and then close the book. It is said that Sarah gave birth to Isaac on Rosh Hashanah.
Shofar is a traditional, Jewish blowing horn. This horn is usually that of a ram. For ages, this blowing horn has been used in various Jewish rituals and religious ceremonies. Rituals like Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah involves blowing of the shofars. Blowing of the shofars is also widely prevalent in many customs held at synagogues.

The shofar also serves as a symbol of the Jewish people and their covenant with G-d. The call of the shofar represents breath and life. The bend of the horn represents man’s sin. The use of ram’s horn recalls Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his own son as part of his obedience to G-d and G-d’s ultimate offering of the ram as an alternative sacrifice.

Get your children involved. Too often, children aren’t involved in Jewish holiday preparation except Purim, which is a costume-clad holiday with similarities to Halloween. This year, have your children prepare parts of Rosh Hashanah. In the kitchen, they can cut the apples and pour the honey into little cups. Let them rip up a challah for honey-dipping. With supervision, they can braise the brisket.

And we can do the same every day of every year. We can write our own page in the Book of Life today, tomorrow, next week, next month, next year. How do we accomplish this? By reviewing our actions and goals from the last year, noticing where we fell short of achieving our desired outcomes and then setting new targets for the new year. However, we must take another step: We must write on the blank pages of the book by visualizing our new goals in fine detail and feeling exactly what it would be like if we had already manifested these results. In other words, we must imagine the life we want, the behaviors to which we aspire as if they had been published in that book – sealed, already done, accomplished.

A little hole shouldn’t be a problem, right? Glue and plaster will do the trick! Not so fast. Once a shofar has a hole or crack in it, it cannot be mended — it is rendered prohibited on the spot and cannot be used in a synagogue on Rosh Hashana or Yom Kippur.

No matter the amount or work and planning they put into, a wedding is not just about two people. It is about religion, tradition and the joining of two families. Couples should be sensitive to tradition when they plan their nuptials.

And this call goes out to all Christians, not merely priests, bishops and Peter’s successor as pope, “the servant of the servants of God.” Sin, in every expression, is self-centeredness at the expense of others. We must think and speak and act with the same humility, the same emptying of self, that Christ modeled throughout His earthly ministry and all the way to the cross.

In the dining room, let your children create special placeholders for each guest. If you have time and money, take your children to a pottery store to paint their own kiddush cups. You also can buy simple metal goblets from a home store and have your children decorate the stems.

How To Make Perfect Honey Cake For Rosh Hashanah!

How To Make Perfect Honey Cake For Rosh Hashanah!

He kept them, (Acts 20:6,16; 27:9) and urged us to follow his example, 1Cor 11:1; 5:8. And, like the scribes of old who blotted the ink to “seal it,” we do the same and then close the book. It is said that Sarah gave birth to Isaac on Rosh Hashanah.
Shofar is a traditional, Jewish blowing horn. This horn is usually that of a ram. For ages, this blowing horn has been used in various Jewish rituals and religious ceremonies. Rituals like Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah involves blowing of the shofars. Blowing of the shofars is also widely prevalent in many customs held at synagogues.

The shofar also serves as a symbol of the Jewish people and their covenant with G-d. The call of the shofar represents breath and life. The bend of the horn represents man’s sin. The use of ram’s horn recalls Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his own son as part of his obedience to G-d and G-d’s ultimate offering of the ram as an alternative sacrifice.

Get your children involved. Too often, children aren’t involved in Jewish holiday preparation except Purim, which is a costume-clad holiday with similarities to Halloween. This year, have your children prepare parts of Rosh Hashanah. In the kitchen, they can cut the apples and pour the honey into little cups. Let them rip up a challah for honey-dipping. With supervision, they can braise the brisket.

And we can do the same every day of every year. We can write our own page in the Book of Life today, tomorrow, next week, next month, next year. How do we accomplish this? By reviewing our actions and goals from the last year, noticing where we fell short of achieving our desired outcomes and then setting new targets for the new year. However, we must take another step: We must write on the blank pages of the book by visualizing our new goals in fine detail and feeling exactly what it would be like if we had already manifested these results. In other words, we must imagine the life we want, the behaviors to which we aspire as if they had been published in that book – sealed, already done, accomplished.

A little hole shouldn’t be a problem, right? Glue and plaster will do the trick! Not so fast. Once a shofar has a hole or crack in it, it cannot be mended — it is rendered prohibited on the spot and cannot be used in a synagogue on Rosh Hashana or Yom Kippur.

No matter the amount or work and planning they put into, a wedding is not just about two people. It is about religion, tradition and the joining of two families. Couples should be sensitive to tradition when they plan their nuptials.

And this call goes out to all Christians, not merely priests, bishops and Peter’s successor as pope, “the servant of the servants of God.” Sin, in every expression, is self-centeredness at the expense of others. We must think and speak and act with the same humility, the same emptying of self, that Christ modeled throughout His earthly ministry and all the way to the cross.

In the dining room, let your children create special placeholders for each guest. If you have time and money, take your children to a pottery store to paint their own kiddush cups. You also can buy simple metal goblets from a home store and have your children decorate the stems.

He kept them, (Acts 20:6,16; 27:9) and urged us to follow his example, 1Cor 11:1; 5:8. And, like the scribes of old who blotted the ink to “seal it,” we do the same and then close the book. It is said that Sarah gave birth to Isaac on Rosh Hashanah.
Shofar is a traditional, Jewish blowing horn. This horn is usually that of a ram. For ages, this blowing horn has been used in various Jewish rituals and religious ceremonies. Rituals like Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah involves blowing of the shofars. Blowing of the shofars is also widely prevalent in many customs held at synagogues.

The shofar also serves as a symbol of the Jewish people and their covenant with G-d. The call of the shofar represents breath and life. The bend of the horn represents man’s sin. The use of ram’s horn recalls Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his own son as part of his obedience to G-d and G-d’s ultimate offering of the ram as an alternative sacrifice.

Get your children involved. Too often, children aren’t involved in Jewish holiday preparation except Purim, which is a costume-clad holiday with similarities to Halloween. This year, have your children prepare parts of Rosh Hashanah. In the kitchen, they can cut the apples and pour the honey into little cups. Let them rip up a challah for honey-dipping. With supervision, they can braise the brisket.

And we can do the same every day of every year. We can write our own page in the Book of Life today, tomorrow, next week, next month, next year. How do we accomplish this? By reviewing our actions and goals from the last year, noticing where we fell short of achieving our desired outcomes and then setting new targets for the new year. However, we must take another step: We must write on the blank pages of the book by visualizing our new goals in fine detail and feeling exactly what it would be like if we had already manifested these results. In other words, we must imagine the life we want, the behaviors to which we aspire as if they had been published in that book – sealed, already done, accomplished.

A little hole shouldn’t be a problem, right? Glue and plaster will do the trick! Not so fast. Once a shofar has a hole or crack in it, it cannot be mended — it is rendered prohibited on the spot and cannot be used in a synagogue on Rosh Hashana or Yom Kippur.

No matter the amount or work and planning they put into, a wedding is not just about two people. It is about religion, tradition and the joining of two families. Couples should be sensitive to tradition when they plan their nuptials.

And this call goes out to all Christians, not merely priests, bishops and Peter’s successor as pope, “the servant of the servants of God.” Sin, in every expression, is self-centeredness at the expense of others. We must think and speak and act with the same humility, the same emptying of self, that Christ modeled throughout His earthly ministry and all the way to the cross.

In the dining room, let your children create special placeholders for each guest. If you have time and money, take your children to a pottery store to paint their own kiddush cups. You also can buy simple metal goblets from a home store and have your children decorate the stems.