How To Secure A Good Judgement On Rosh Hashanah

How To Secure A Good Judgement On Rosh Hashanah

Given that it is September some people may have trouble coming up with a fresh option that guests won’t know. Couples are not to be wed during the holy months of Ramadan and Muharram. Peter has the right motives, but the wrong understanding.
Maybe you are a member of a synagogue or havurah and you don’t need to worry about this. You have a ticket in your hot little hand because you paid your dues this year.

In the alternative of eating the fish head, pike, carp, tilapia, whitefish, and salmon are commonly served. In some homes, whitefish, tilapia and cod are made into gefilte fish and served with broth or tomato sauce.

As such, the shofar is not sounded on Shabbat. Even if Rosh Hashanah, which requires the mitzvah of sounding the shofar, falls on Shabbat, the special horn is not blown. While the practice seems Rabbinical in nature, it may relate to the prohibition against labor during the Shabbat.

The bottom line is that I am not here to bash religion at all. Whatever you believe is fine with me. If you want to go to church every Sunday, go for it. If you want to go to Temple, more power to you. If you’re a Buddhist, good for you.

The month of January was named after this god with two faces; one forever looking forward, the other looking back. Janus is always shown holding a key in his right hand, enabling him to unlock the New Year, and to lock close the old. In his left hand he holds a scepter a symbol of power.

When the Romans invaded England, they found the Druids celebrating New Year’s Day on March 10. The pagan priest would cut off branches of mistletoe on this day and carefully allow them to fall onto a sacred blanket. The branches would then be distributed among the Celtic people to be used as magical charms and for protection against evil spirits.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?

Given that it is September some people may have trouble coming up with a fresh option that guests won’t know. Couples are not to be wed during the holy months of Ramadan and Muharram. Peter has the right motives, but the wrong understanding.
Maybe you are a member of a synagogue or havurah and you don’t need to worry about this. You have a ticket in your hot little hand because you paid your dues this year.

In the alternative of eating the fish head, pike, carp, tilapia, whitefish, and salmon are commonly served. In some homes, whitefish, tilapia and cod are made into gefilte fish and served with broth or tomato sauce.

As such, the shofar is not sounded on Shabbat. Even if Rosh Hashanah, which requires the mitzvah of sounding the shofar, falls on Shabbat, the special horn is not blown. While the practice seems Rabbinical in nature, it may relate to the prohibition against labor during the Shabbat.

The bottom line is that I am not here to bash religion at all. Whatever you believe is fine with me. If you want to go to church every Sunday, go for it. If you want to go to Temple, more power to you. If you’re a Buddhist, good for you.

The month of January was named after this god with two faces; one forever looking forward, the other looking back. Janus is always shown holding a key in his right hand, enabling him to unlock the New Year, and to lock close the old. In his left hand he holds a scepter a symbol of power.

When the Romans invaded England, they found the Druids celebrating New Year’s Day on March 10. The pagan priest would cut off branches of mistletoe on this day and carefully allow them to fall onto a sacred blanket. The branches would then be distributed among the Celtic people to be used as magical charms and for protection against evil spirits.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?