Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Definitely makes it easy to remember with it being on such a monumental New Year’s Eve.
Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

My first name is short for Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, fertility and music. I used to go by DJ Dionysus in the late ’90’s but it would always get misspelled on fliers and mispronounced, so I shortened it around 2002 to DJ Nysus.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

To compare the “Rave” scene in the 90s to the “Hippie” movement is a misnomer. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand. The motive, of course.end the Vietnam War. In the meantime, of course.get as fucked up as you could, while having free-love sex with as many partners as you could physically handle.

So I breakbeat went out and bought a Gemini DJ in a Box set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

The song has become well known in pop culture, being mentioned in TV shows and films such as The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Malibu’s Most Wanted, Monk, and The Office. “O.P.P.” also gained critical acclaim, being named one of the top 100 rap singles of all time in 1998 by The Source magazine , and being ranked the 20th best single of the ’90s by Spin magazine.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Definitely makes it easy to remember with it being on such a monumental New Year’s Eve.
Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

My first name is short for Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, fertility and music. I used to go by DJ Dionysus in the late ’90’s but it would always get misspelled on fliers and mispronounced, so I shortened it around 2002 to DJ Nysus.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

To compare the “Rave” scene in the 90s to the “Hippie” movement is a misnomer. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand. The motive, of course.end the Vietnam War. In the meantime, of course.get as fucked up as you could, while having free-love sex with as many partners as you could physically handle.

So I breakbeat went out and bought a Gemini DJ in a Box set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

The song has become well known in pop culture, being mentioned in TV shows and films such as The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Malibu’s Most Wanted, Monk, and The Office. “O.P.P.” also gained critical acclaim, being named one of the top 100 rap singles of all time in 1998 by The Source magazine , and being ranked the 20th best single of the ’90s by Spin magazine.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Definitely makes it easy to remember with it being on such a monumental New Year’s Eve.
Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

My first name is short for Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, fertility and music. I used to go by DJ Dionysus in the late ’90’s but it would always get misspelled on fliers and mispronounced, so I shortened it around 2002 to DJ Nysus.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

To compare the “Rave” scene in the 90s to the “Hippie” movement is a misnomer. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand. The motive, of course.end the Vietnam War. In the meantime, of course.get as fucked up as you could, while having free-love sex with as many partners as you could physically handle.

So I breakbeat went out and bought a Gemini DJ in a Box set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

The song has become well known in pop culture, being mentioned in TV shows and films such as The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Malibu’s Most Wanted, Monk, and The Office. “O.P.P.” also gained critical acclaim, being named one of the top 100 rap singles of all time in 1998 by The Source magazine , and being ranked the 20th best single of the ’90s by Spin magazine.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Definitely makes it easy to remember with it being on such a monumental New Year’s Eve.
Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

My first name is short for Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, fertility and music. I used to go by DJ Dionysus in the late ’90’s but it would always get misspelled on fliers and mispronounced, so I shortened it around 2002 to DJ Nysus.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

To compare the “Rave” scene in the 90s to the “Hippie” movement is a misnomer. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand. The motive, of course.end the Vietnam War. In the meantime, of course.get as fucked up as you could, while having free-love sex with as many partners as you could physically handle.

So I breakbeat went out and bought a Gemini DJ in a Box set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

The song has become well known in pop culture, being mentioned in TV shows and films such as The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Malibu’s Most Wanted, Monk, and The Office. “O.P.P.” also gained critical acclaim, being named one of the top 100 rap singles of all time in 1998 by The Source magazine , and being ranked the 20th best single of the ’90s by Spin magazine.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.