Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Between albums, the group also scored a major hit with the track “Uptown Anthem”, from the soundtrack to the 1992 film Juice. In the career of Zany, progress and innovation are two key words. He started to develop his own record label Divine Mill.
Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

EOTO is now a full time gig for the pair with a seemingly endless tour featuring over 700 shows and sold out performances in every market in the country. They fine-tune their approach and skill with each and every show they play, making the next performance more unique than the last.

Examiner: You definitely came to be a figurehead in the late-90s underground boom in New York. Can you tell me what types of things you thought really made that scene special, really made it something like a movement?

It’s not hard to piece together how or why it all started. Of course masses would come together just to “listen” to something so totally different from anything ever before. Sure there were elements of earlier genres-freestyle, b-boy, disco, etc.of course we imported the early House from Europe. But we transcended it somehow. What was created in Florida in the 90s was a movement- bonded together spiritually by a love of music- which we were creating as well as listening to. It could be said that the Florida breakbeat scene in the 90s transformed itself somehow into an all-inclusive, self-sustaining organism. At some point the organism itself (the scene) began to morph on its on, eventually controlling even those instrumental in creating it.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

The Spring Massive at the Paradox is gonna be insane as will Starscape 2009. I am also headlining this huge three-day festival alongside DJ Swamp and like 50 others called Willy Wonka and the Bass Factory on June 19-21 in West Virginia, which I am sure will be an experience!

Between albums, the group also scored a major hit with the track “Uptown Anthem”, from the soundtrack to the 1992 film Juice. In the career of Zany, progress and innovation are two key words. He started to develop his own record label Divine Mill.
Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

EOTO is now a full time gig for the pair with a seemingly endless tour featuring over 700 shows and sold out performances in every market in the country. They fine-tune their approach and skill with each and every show they play, making the next performance more unique than the last.

Examiner: You definitely came to be a figurehead in the late-90s underground boom in New York. Can you tell me what types of things you thought really made that scene special, really made it something like a movement?

It’s not hard to piece together how or why it all started. Of course masses would come together just to “listen” to something so totally different from anything ever before. Sure there were elements of earlier genres-freestyle, b-boy, disco, etc.of course we imported the early House from Europe. But we transcended it somehow. What was created in Florida in the 90s was a movement- bonded together spiritually by a love of music- which we were creating as well as listening to. It could be said that the Florida breakbeat scene in the 90s transformed itself somehow into an all-inclusive, self-sustaining organism. At some point the organism itself (the scene) began to morph on its on, eventually controlling even those instrumental in creating it.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

The Spring Massive at the Paradox is gonna be insane as will Starscape 2009. I am also headlining this huge three-day festival alongside DJ Swamp and like 50 others called Willy Wonka and the Bass Factory on June 19-21 in West Virginia, which I am sure will be an experience!

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Between albums, the group also scored a major hit with the track “Uptown Anthem”, from the soundtrack to the 1992 film Juice. In the career of Zany, progress and innovation are two key words. He started to develop his own record label Divine Mill.
Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

EOTO is now a full time gig for the pair with a seemingly endless tour featuring over 700 shows and sold out performances in every market in the country. They fine-tune their approach and skill with each and every show they play, making the next performance more unique than the last.

Examiner: You definitely came to be a figurehead in the late-90s underground boom in New York. Can you tell me what types of things you thought really made that scene special, really made it something like a movement?

It’s not hard to piece together how or why it all started. Of course masses would come together just to “listen” to something so totally different from anything ever before. Sure there were elements of earlier genres-freestyle, b-boy, disco, etc.of course we imported the early House from Europe. But we transcended it somehow. What was created in Florida in the 90s was a movement- bonded together spiritually by a love of music- which we were creating as well as listening to. It could be said that the Florida breakbeat scene in the 90s transformed itself somehow into an all-inclusive, self-sustaining organism. At some point the organism itself (the scene) began to morph on its on, eventually controlling even those instrumental in creating it.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

The Spring Massive at the Paradox is gonna be insane as will Starscape 2009. I am also headlining this huge three-day festival alongside DJ Swamp and like 50 others called Willy Wonka and the Bass Factory on June 19-21 in West Virginia, which I am sure will be an experience!

Between albums, the group also scored a major hit with the track “Uptown Anthem”, from the soundtrack to the 1992 film Juice. In the career of Zany, progress and innovation are two key words. He started to develop his own record label Divine Mill.
Do you remember the fresh smell of the Florida air and the sweet sting of the wind through your hair while speeding down the interstate, windows down, blasting the baddess-ass Breakz track noone’s ever heard at 1AM- your crew in the back seat rolling their asses off, while you all knew you were about to entirely “make” the vibe of the party?

EOTO is now a full time gig for the pair with a seemingly endless tour featuring over 700 shows and sold out performances in every market in the country. They fine-tune their approach and skill with each and every show they play, making the next performance more unique than the last.

Examiner: You definitely came to be a figurehead in the late-90s underground boom in New York. Can you tell me what types of things you thought really made that scene special, really made it something like a movement?

It’s not hard to piece together how or why it all started. Of course masses would come together just to “listen” to something so totally different from anything ever before. Sure there were elements of earlier genres-freestyle, b-boy, disco, etc.of course we imported the early House from Europe. But we transcended it somehow. What was created in Florida in the 90s was a movement- bonded together spiritually by a love of music- which we were creating as well as listening to. It could be said that the Florida breakbeat scene in the 90s transformed itself somehow into an all-inclusive, self-sustaining organism. At some point the organism itself (the scene) began to morph on its on, eventually controlling even those instrumental in creating it.

And then on top of that, we had shows. There were a lot of shows going on. Radio programming supported it as well. Underground hip-hop radio shows. Every night of the week in New York, you could pretty much tune in somewhere and hear underground hip-hop. So the support system was there back then.

NT (Kool & The Gang) – This features one of the ever-present drum breaks that you could hear in almost every hip hop song. Its first main hip hop appearance was heard as a sample on NWA’s “Gangsta Gangsta”.

The Spring Massive at the Paradox is gonna be insane as will Starscape 2009. I am also headlining this huge three-day festival alongside DJ Swamp and like 50 others called Willy Wonka and the Bass Factory on June 19-21 in West Virginia, which I am sure will be an experience!