Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand.
DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

Julian Marley, the son of the legendary Bob Marley, will be performing songs from his latest release, Awake, a collaboration with the Ghetto Youths International production team founded by siblings Stephen and Ziggy.

Throbbing bass and thudding beats are the signatures of the venture from Travis and Hann, born out of their shared love of electronic dance music. The project started out as an avenue for the long time friends to blow off steam and generally just have a good time playing around with technology and music.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand.
DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

Julian Marley, the son of the legendary Bob Marley, will be performing songs from his latest release, Awake, a collaboration with the Ghetto Youths International production team founded by siblings Stephen and Ziggy.

Throbbing bass and thudding beats are the signatures of the venture from Travis and Hann, born out of their shared love of electronic dance music. The project started out as an avenue for the long time friends to blow off steam and generally just have a good time playing around with technology and music.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand.
DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

Julian Marley, the son of the legendary Bob Marley, will be performing songs from his latest release, Awake, a collaboration with the Ghetto Youths International production team founded by siblings Stephen and Ziggy.

Throbbing bass and thudding beats are the signatures of the venture from Travis and Hann, born out of their shared love of electronic dance music. The project started out as an avenue for the long time friends to blow off steam and generally just have a good time playing around with technology and music.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand.
DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

Julian Marley, the son of the legendary Bob Marley, will be performing songs from his latest release, Awake, a collaboration with the Ghetto Youths International production team founded by siblings Stephen and Ziggy.

Throbbing bass and thudding beats are the signatures of the venture from Travis and Hann, born out of their shared love of electronic dance music. The project started out as an avenue for the long time friends to blow off steam and generally just have a good time playing around with technology and music.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.