Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

This music is thought for coming about a figure mix figure of another musical genre mostly trance and rave song. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. And then I started getting remixes and production.

Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

My first name is short for Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, fertility and music. I used to go by DJ Dionysus in the late ’90’s but it would always get misspelled on fliers and mispronounced, so I shortened it around 2002 to DJ Nysus.

While borrowing from different styles, EOTO’s improvisational skills have resulted in a style and genre of music that is completely their own. Some may call it “dubstep” or others may find their unique sound rooted in “house/breakbeat” or even drum and bass – but one thing’s for sure, they’re experts at detonating the party bomb.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

Drum and bass branched off from the rave scene during the 1980s and since then, multiple elements have been incorporated into it. Jazz, rock, trance, metal, house, hip hop, and many other genres fused into the bass beats to give each track a unique feel.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

Whether you want the euphoric moments – or just want to have your face ripped off – you have one more chance to see EOTO in 2010. The band plays their favorite show of the year on New Years – which is set to take place on their home-stomping grounds at City Hall in Denver at 8 pm. The show also features Dieselboy, Liquidstranger, Heyoka, NastyNasty, Nit Grit, Freddy Todd, Rumblejunkie, Jantsen, S.P.E.C.T.R.E., and Ishe to name a few. Tickets are $25 in advance, $40 at the door.

This music is thought for coming about a figure mix figure of another musical genre mostly trance and rave song. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. And then I started getting remixes and production.

Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

My first name is short for Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, fertility and music. I used to go by DJ Dionysus in the late ’90’s but it would always get misspelled on fliers and mispronounced, so I shortened it around 2002 to DJ Nysus.

While borrowing from different styles, EOTO’s improvisational skills have resulted in a style and genre of music that is completely their own. Some may call it “dubstep” or others may find their unique sound rooted in “house/breakbeat” or even drum and bass – but one thing’s for sure, they’re experts at detonating the party bomb.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

Drum and bass branched off from the rave scene during the 1980s and since then, multiple elements have been incorporated into it. Jazz, rock, trance, metal, house, hip hop, and many other genres fused into the bass beats to give each track a unique feel.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

Whether you want the euphoric moments – or just want to have your face ripped off – you have one more chance to see EOTO in 2010. The band plays their favorite show of the year on New Years – which is set to take place on their home-stomping grounds at City Hall in Denver at 8 pm. The show also features Dieselboy, Liquidstranger, Heyoka, NastyNasty, Nit Grit, Freddy Todd, Rumblejunkie, Jantsen, S.P.E.C.T.R.E., and Ishe to name a few. Tickets are $25 in advance, $40 at the door.

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

This music is thought for coming about a figure mix figure of another musical genre mostly trance and rave song. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. And then I started getting remixes and production.

Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

My first name is short for Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, fertility and music. I used to go by DJ Dionysus in the late ’90’s but it would always get misspelled on fliers and mispronounced, so I shortened it around 2002 to DJ Nysus.

While borrowing from different styles, EOTO’s improvisational skills have resulted in a style and genre of music that is completely their own. Some may call it “dubstep” or others may find their unique sound rooted in “house/breakbeat” or even drum and bass – but one thing’s for sure, they’re experts at detonating the party bomb.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

Drum and bass branched off from the rave scene during the 1980s and since then, multiple elements have been incorporated into it. Jazz, rock, trance, metal, house, hip hop, and many other genres fused into the bass beats to give each track a unique feel.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

Whether you want the euphoric moments – or just want to have your face ripped off – you have one more chance to see EOTO in 2010. The band plays their favorite show of the year on New Years – which is set to take place on their home-stomping grounds at City Hall in Denver at 8 pm. The show also features Dieselboy, Liquidstranger, Heyoka, NastyNasty, Nit Grit, Freddy Todd, Rumblejunkie, Jantsen, S.P.E.C.T.R.E., and Ishe to name a few. Tickets are $25 in advance, $40 at the door.

This music is thought for coming about a figure mix figure of another musical genre mostly trance and rave song. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. And then I started getting remixes and production.

Now that the summer season has officially began, Little Five Points will see a lot more good-quality music and entertainment, and it won’t hesitate to slap everyone in the face! Here are a few highlighting shows for the week.

My first name is short for Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, fertility and music. I used to go by DJ Dionysus in the late ’90’s but it would always get misspelled on fliers and mispronounced, so I shortened it around 2002 to DJ Nysus.

While borrowing from different styles, EOTO’s improvisational skills have resulted in a style and genre of music that is completely their own. Some may call it “dubstep” or others may find their unique sound rooted in “house/breakbeat” or even drum and bass – but one thing’s for sure, they’re experts at detonating the party bomb.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

Listening to Drop the Lime is like catching an aural virus. A feverish urge swells in your temporal lobe. You get chills. Sweat beads form on your forehead. Your mouth dries and begs for water or a chilled cocktail. Suddenly, that feverish urge grows like a hearbeat in your temple, forcing you, slowly but surely, to bang your head dizzyingly to the beat. Boom-waht-boom-waht-chagachaga-boom-waht.

Drum and bass branched off from the rave scene during the 1980s and since then, multiple elements have been incorporated into it. Jazz, rock, trance, metal, house, hip hop, and many other genres fused into the bass beats to give each track a unique feel.

What began as something everyone could be a part of- became something you had to “prove yourself” in to be apart of. And if you did “fit” in- you became part of the ever-building “vibe.” I remember a conversation in the mid 90s with my friend Billy, a popular breakdancer in North Florida at the time. He said, as were driving to a party in Orlando, “You see- everyone’s got a job- the dancer- the DJ- the drug-dealer. And if we all do our job right- the end result is a good “vibe.” Good god, had we made drug-dealer a “respectable profession?” The scene had become both beautiful and dangerous.

Whether you want the euphoric moments – or just want to have your face ripped off – you have one more chance to see EOTO in 2010. The band plays their favorite show of the year on New Years – which is set to take place on their home-stomping grounds at City Hall in Denver at 8 pm. The show also features Dieselboy, Liquidstranger, Heyoka, NastyNasty, Nit Grit, Freddy Todd, Rumblejunkie, Jantsen, S.P.E.C.T.R.E., and Ishe to name a few. Tickets are $25 in advance, $40 at the door.