Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

It was notably used in a minor hit known as Girls Around the World by R&B singer Lloyd. It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100. Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college.
The Sactown summer concert season is about to hit high gear – and we’re not talking about your Green Days, your Keith Urbans, and your “Bundles of Burnouts” tours with (insert ’80s hair metal band, featuring Bo Bice).

Starscape Festival 2008 was definitely a dream realized. Otakon Anime Festival in Baltimore is an interesting show and always one of my most memorable. Winning the Fans Pick the DJ’s contest back in 2005 and getting a Main Room slot at CUBIK was definitely another realization of a dream. I could go on and on, but my favorite current venue to play is the Black Hole in Maryland, a little place but I love it there!

It’s not hard to piece together how or why it all started. Of course masses would come together just to “listen” to something so totally different from anything ever before. Sure there were elements of earlier genres-freestyle, b-boy, disco, etc.of course we imported the early House from Europe. But we transcended it somehow. What was created in Florida in the 90s was a movement- bonded together spiritually by a love of music- which we were creating as well as listening to. It could be said that the Florida breakbeat scene in the 90s transformed itself somehow into an all-inclusive, self-sustaining organism. At some point the organism itself (the scene) began to morph on its on, eventually controlling even those instrumental in creating it.

That’s exactly what seasoned drummers Michael Travis and Jason Hann had in mind when they formed EOTO in 2006. Hann talked about the band’s electrifying improvisation before a recent gig in Atlanta.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

Its video was directed by Spike Lee and featured other hip-hop artists popular in the early 1990s, including Queen Latifah, Eazy-E, Run-D.M.C., and Da Youngstas. Poverty’s Paradise won the Grammy Award in 1996 for Best Rap Album, becoming the first album to win this award. It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.

It was notably used in a minor hit known as Girls Around the World by R&B singer Lloyd. It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100. Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college.
The Sactown summer concert season is about to hit high gear – and we’re not talking about your Green Days, your Keith Urbans, and your “Bundles of Burnouts” tours with (insert ’80s hair metal band, featuring Bo Bice).

Starscape Festival 2008 was definitely a dream realized. Otakon Anime Festival in Baltimore is an interesting show and always one of my most memorable. Winning the Fans Pick the DJ’s contest back in 2005 and getting a Main Room slot at CUBIK was definitely another realization of a dream. I could go on and on, but my favorite current venue to play is the Black Hole in Maryland, a little place but I love it there!

It’s not hard to piece together how or why it all started. Of course masses would come together just to “listen” to something so totally different from anything ever before. Sure there were elements of earlier genres-freestyle, b-boy, disco, etc.of course we imported the early House from Europe. But we transcended it somehow. What was created in Florida in the 90s was a movement- bonded together spiritually by a love of music- which we were creating as well as listening to. It could be said that the Florida breakbeat scene in the 90s transformed itself somehow into an all-inclusive, self-sustaining organism. At some point the organism itself (the scene) began to morph on its on, eventually controlling even those instrumental in creating it.

That’s exactly what seasoned drummers Michael Travis and Jason Hann had in mind when they formed EOTO in 2006. Hann talked about the band’s electrifying improvisation before a recent gig in Atlanta.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

Its video was directed by Spike Lee and featured other hip-hop artists popular in the early 1990s, including Queen Latifah, Eazy-E, Run-D.M.C., and Da Youngstas. Poverty’s Paradise won the Grammy Award in 1996 for Best Rap Album, becoming the first album to win this award. It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

It was notably used in a minor hit known as Girls Around the World by R&B singer Lloyd. It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100. Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college.
The Sactown summer concert season is about to hit high gear – and we’re not talking about your Green Days, your Keith Urbans, and your “Bundles of Burnouts” tours with (insert ’80s hair metal band, featuring Bo Bice).

Starscape Festival 2008 was definitely a dream realized. Otakon Anime Festival in Baltimore is an interesting show and always one of my most memorable. Winning the Fans Pick the DJ’s contest back in 2005 and getting a Main Room slot at CUBIK was definitely another realization of a dream. I could go on and on, but my favorite current venue to play is the Black Hole in Maryland, a little place but I love it there!

It’s not hard to piece together how or why it all started. Of course masses would come together just to “listen” to something so totally different from anything ever before. Sure there were elements of earlier genres-freestyle, b-boy, disco, etc.of course we imported the early House from Europe. But we transcended it somehow. What was created in Florida in the 90s was a movement- bonded together spiritually by a love of music- which we were creating as well as listening to. It could be said that the Florida breakbeat scene in the 90s transformed itself somehow into an all-inclusive, self-sustaining organism. At some point the organism itself (the scene) began to morph on its on, eventually controlling even those instrumental in creating it.

That’s exactly what seasoned drummers Michael Travis and Jason Hann had in mind when they formed EOTO in 2006. Hann talked about the band’s electrifying improvisation before a recent gig in Atlanta.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

Its video was directed by Spike Lee and featured other hip-hop artists popular in the early 1990s, including Queen Latifah, Eazy-E, Run-D.M.C., and Da Youngstas. Poverty’s Paradise won the Grammy Award in 1996 for Best Rap Album, becoming the first album to win this award. It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.

It was notably used in a minor hit known as Girls Around the World by R&B singer Lloyd. It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100. Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college.
The Sactown summer concert season is about to hit high gear – and we’re not talking about your Green Days, your Keith Urbans, and your “Bundles of Burnouts” tours with (insert ’80s hair metal band, featuring Bo Bice).

Starscape Festival 2008 was definitely a dream realized. Otakon Anime Festival in Baltimore is an interesting show and always one of my most memorable. Winning the Fans Pick the DJ’s contest back in 2005 and getting a Main Room slot at CUBIK was definitely another realization of a dream. I could go on and on, but my favorite current venue to play is the Black Hole in Maryland, a little place but I love it there!

It’s not hard to piece together how or why it all started. Of course masses would come together just to “listen” to something so totally different from anything ever before. Sure there were elements of earlier genres-freestyle, b-boy, disco, etc.of course we imported the early House from Europe. But we transcended it somehow. What was created in Florida in the 90s was a movement- bonded together spiritually by a love of music- which we were creating as well as listening to. It could be said that the Florida breakbeat scene in the 90s transformed itself somehow into an all-inclusive, self-sustaining organism. At some point the organism itself (the scene) began to morph on its on, eventually controlling even those instrumental in creating it.

That’s exactly what seasoned drummers Michael Travis and Jason Hann had in mind when they formed EOTO in 2006. Hann talked about the band’s electrifying improvisation before a recent gig in Atlanta.

Examiner: To get back to you and your history, I know you’ve been DJing since the early ’80s. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?

Its video was directed by Spike Lee and featured other hip-hop artists popular in the early 1990s, including Queen Latifah, Eazy-E, Run-D.M.C., and Da Youngstas. Poverty’s Paradise won the Grammy Award in 1996 for Best Rap Album, becoming the first album to win this award. It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

10 Years after “Drop The Breakz”, I’m still doing it.just differently. Believe me, I Was, AM, and Always Will BE.Sunrise Society. I can just do it on my own terms now. The “vibe” is still out there. I think it’s in all of us. As long as we’re aware of it, it’ll never die. Call me cheesy, but I feel better for feeling that way. Looking back on the Florida scene in the 90s.