Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. All i can say is that i highly reccomend buying a copy.
Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

Think About It (Lyn Collins) – Rob Base & DJ E-Z Rock’s popular hip hop club hit “It Takes Two” has used the funk classic beat “Think (About It) as its loop sample.

There were occasions of “mass hallucinations”- things felt and seen by multitudes of different folks on different drugs- some even sober (granted, not many). The music itself seemed to have a hallucinogenic power- and if you could create a beautiful painting with your music- you would literally become a “God” in the scene.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. All i can say is that i highly reccomend buying a copy.
Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

Think About It (Lyn Collins) – Rob Base & DJ E-Z Rock’s popular hip hop club hit “It Takes Two” has used the funk classic beat “Think (About It) as its loop sample.

There were occasions of “mass hallucinations”- things felt and seen by multitudes of different folks on different drugs- some even sober (granted, not many). The music itself seemed to have a hallucinogenic power- and if you could create a beautiful painting with your music- you would literally become a “God” in the scene.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. All i can say is that i highly reccomend buying a copy.
Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

Think About It (Lyn Collins) – Rob Base & DJ E-Z Rock’s popular hip hop club hit “It Takes Two” has used the funk classic beat “Think (About It) as its loop sample.

There were occasions of “mass hallucinations”- things felt and seen by multitudes of different folks on different drugs- some even sober (granted, not many). The music itself seemed to have a hallucinogenic power- and if you could create a beautiful painting with your music- you would literally become a “God” in the scene.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. All i can say is that i highly reccomend buying a copy.
Famed producer DJ Spinna rose up during the mid-90’s underground rap boom in New York, leading the way for many a rapper to don Jansports and spit at the establishment. Spinna, real name Vincent Williams, came to be a rite of passage for underground rappers. You weren’t sh*t unless Spinna laced you with a remix. Consequently, he worked with everyone from Pharoahe Monch to J-Live to Mos Def to Guru from Gangstarr and even to a young Eminem.

One of the problems with the scene, helping lead to its eventual demise, was that what we were fighting FOR, happened to be exactly what we were AGAINST. As we gathered by the thousands to fight for the respect of this new musical style, when it did morph into something mainstream- we hated it and turned our back on it. 20 years later, electronica is highly respected. Artists like Lady GaGa and 3OH3 have brought techno beats to the masses. Video games have put techno in the hands of 12 year-olds, and car commercials have created techno anthems. WOW- we won! 20 years later techno is still around, and more popular than ever. The problem is, it didn’t happen exactly like we thought it would. Well, it never does. Still, part of the reason the scene is over is that we have nothing to go back and prove.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

There are honestly too many to name. I definitely play a lot of the breakbeat greats of today in my sets including Stanton Warriors and the Plump DJ’s and all the bigger UK Sound that I love so much now. But as far as inspiration to push myself and my craft, I get that almost exclusively from the amazing talented locals that DC has. I am lucky enough to either be in a crew with them or friends with them or constantly working on random musical projects. That is the life blood that keeps me moving!

Think About It (Lyn Collins) – Rob Base & DJ E-Z Rock’s popular hip hop club hit “It Takes Two” has used the funk classic beat “Think (About It) as its loop sample.

There were occasions of “mass hallucinations”- things felt and seen by multitudes of different folks on different drugs- some even sober (granted, not many). The music itself seemed to have a hallucinogenic power- and if you could create a beautiful painting with your music- you would literally become a “God” in the scene.

The night was capped off with a salute to the production team who had backed Amanda Davids’ latest recording, including DJ Xplisit, Shai Locke, and mastering genius Karl Machat. And then – as quickly as it had captivated us, it was over. It left us wanting. It left us excited to buy Canadian music. It left us willing to pursue the discovery of underpromoted arts and culture. It left us wishing we had restocked our cars with our favourite Herbie Hancock and Mary J. Blige cd’s for the ride home.