Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Hardstyle fans, like one other music genre have been often disputing. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up.
The Sactown summer concert season is about to hit high gear – and we’re not talking about your Green Days, your Keith Urbans, and your “Bundles of Burnouts” tours with (insert ’80s hair metal band, featuring Bo Bice).

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

Drum and bass branched off from the rave scene during the 1980s and since then, multiple elements have been incorporated into it. Jazz, rock, trance, metal, house, hip hop, and many other genres fused into the bass beats to give each track a unique feel.

It’s back to kick off the summer season! After the buzz from the first installment of breakbeat this dub-metal show it was inevitable for this monstrous event to keep going. Featured for Vol. 2: Mutiny is A Fight for Life, Dan Brown, Collapse of the Empire and a special collaboration between Dubstruction returners Forge by Fire and TRiLLBASS.

Do you remember the feeling of the first dew drop of the morning at 5AM- while dancing with the hottest chick you’d never know her name- on a rooftop surrounded by palmtrees, overlooking the skyscape of the whole city that only you knew as it “really ” was- listening to best damn downtempo DJ that you’ve ever seen?

I remember the popular slogan, “One Drug, One love”- which summed up in a nutshell that only ecstasy could help you hear this music correctly, and any other drug was not only unnecessary- but shunned. Other slogans began to turn up in later years, as more dangerous drugs creeped into the underground. “Together we stand- Divided we fall OUT”- explained that if we didn’t watch each other, the scene would not only collapse, but you may end up in the hospital.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Hardstyle fans, like one other music genre have been often disputing. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up.
The Sactown summer concert season is about to hit high gear – and we’re not talking about your Green Days, your Keith Urbans, and your “Bundles of Burnouts” tours with (insert ’80s hair metal band, featuring Bo Bice).

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

Drum and bass branched off from the rave scene during the 1980s and since then, multiple elements have been incorporated into it. Jazz, rock, trance, metal, house, hip hop, and many other genres fused into the bass beats to give each track a unique feel.

It’s back to kick off the summer season! After the buzz from the first installment of breakbeat this dub-metal show it was inevitable for this monstrous event to keep going. Featured for Vol. 2: Mutiny is A Fight for Life, Dan Brown, Collapse of the Empire and a special collaboration between Dubstruction returners Forge by Fire and TRiLLBASS.

Do you remember the feeling of the first dew drop of the morning at 5AM- while dancing with the hottest chick you’d never know her name- on a rooftop surrounded by palmtrees, overlooking the skyscape of the whole city that only you knew as it “really ” was- listening to best damn downtempo DJ that you’ve ever seen?

I remember the popular slogan, “One Drug, One love”- which summed up in a nutshell that only ecstasy could help you hear this music correctly, and any other drug was not only unnecessary- but shunned. Other slogans began to turn up in later years, as more dangerous drugs creeped into the underground. “Together we stand- Divided we fall OUT”- explained that if we didn’t watch each other, the scene would not only collapse, but you may end up in the hospital.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Hardstyle fans, like one other music genre have been often disputing. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up.
The Sactown summer concert season is about to hit high gear – and we’re not talking about your Green Days, your Keith Urbans, and your “Bundles of Burnouts” tours with (insert ’80s hair metal band, featuring Bo Bice).

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

Drum and bass branched off from the rave scene during the 1980s and since then, multiple elements have been incorporated into it. Jazz, rock, trance, metal, house, hip hop, and many other genres fused into the bass beats to give each track a unique feel.

It’s back to kick off the summer season! After the buzz from the first installment of breakbeat this dub-metal show it was inevitable for this monstrous event to keep going. Featured for Vol. 2: Mutiny is A Fight for Life, Dan Brown, Collapse of the Empire and a special collaboration between Dubstruction returners Forge by Fire and TRiLLBASS.

Do you remember the feeling of the first dew drop of the morning at 5AM- while dancing with the hottest chick you’d never know her name- on a rooftop surrounded by palmtrees, overlooking the skyscape of the whole city that only you knew as it “really ” was- listening to best damn downtempo DJ that you’ve ever seen?

I remember the popular slogan, “One Drug, One love”- which summed up in a nutshell that only ecstasy could help you hear this music correctly, and any other drug was not only unnecessary- but shunned. Other slogans began to turn up in later years, as more dangerous drugs creeped into the underground. “Together we stand- Divided we fall OUT”- explained that if we didn’t watch each other, the scene would not only collapse, but you may end up in the hospital.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Hardstyle fans, like one other music genre have been often disputing. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up.
The Sactown summer concert season is about to hit high gear – and we’re not talking about your Green Days, your Keith Urbans, and your “Bundles of Burnouts” tours with (insert ’80s hair metal band, featuring Bo Bice).

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

Drum and bass branched off from the rave scene during the 1980s and since then, multiple elements have been incorporated into it. Jazz, rock, trance, metal, house, hip hop, and many other genres fused into the bass beats to give each track a unique feel.

It’s back to kick off the summer season! After the buzz from the first installment of breakbeat this dub-metal show it was inevitable for this monstrous event to keep going. Featured for Vol. 2: Mutiny is A Fight for Life, Dan Brown, Collapse of the Empire and a special collaboration between Dubstruction returners Forge by Fire and TRiLLBASS.

Do you remember the feeling of the first dew drop of the morning at 5AM- while dancing with the hottest chick you’d never know her name- on a rooftop surrounded by palmtrees, overlooking the skyscape of the whole city that only you knew as it “really ” was- listening to best damn downtempo DJ that you’ve ever seen?

I remember the popular slogan, “One Drug, One love”- which summed up in a nutshell that only ecstasy could help you hear this music correctly, and any other drug was not only unnecessary- but shunned. Other slogans began to turn up in later years, as more dangerous drugs creeped into the underground. “Together we stand- Divided we fall OUT”- explained that if we didn’t watch each other, the scene would not only collapse, but you may end up in the hospital.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.