Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Since 1996, tracks have remained in the mid-170 BPM range, producing what we know today as drum and bass. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand.
After all, some fans prefer artists that stick to a tried and true concert formula, playing a tune live that is indistinguishable from the studio version. Other fans want something a little more diverse. Bands that play a different set list every night, for instance.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention. What they achieve on stage is nothing short of astounding. Performed with all of the bells and whistles of a traditional electronic artist plus the addition of live instruments and vocals, the duo creates every bass ridden blast right before your eyes – without the addition of a single pre-recorded track.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because breakbeat there wasn’t one making it not even classifiable as a movement at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

The album also generated another hit, a reworking of Bob Marley’s “No Woman No Cry” called “Everything’s Gonna be All Right” (the track was also called “Ghetto Bastard” on some explicit releases). That song detailed the experiences of Treach growing up in poverty, and now rising up to live a better life. Powered by the success of that song and “O.P.P.”, their self titled album went platinum.

Eventually, the idea of the “vibe” became more widespread, encompassing everything- the music, the people, the overall feeling of the party. Almost everyone believed in it now. Ravers believed that this entity could appear out of nowhere, much like the “Holy Spirit”, coming down upon the party and blessing it with good times.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Since 1996, tracks have remained in the mid-170 BPM range, producing what we know today as drum and bass. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand.
After all, some fans prefer artists that stick to a tried and true concert formula, playing a tune live that is indistinguishable from the studio version. Other fans want something a little more diverse. Bands that play a different set list every night, for instance.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention. What they achieve on stage is nothing short of astounding. Performed with all of the bells and whistles of a traditional electronic artist plus the addition of live instruments and vocals, the duo creates every bass ridden blast right before your eyes – without the addition of a single pre-recorded track.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because breakbeat there wasn’t one making it not even classifiable as a movement at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

The album also generated another hit, a reworking of Bob Marley’s “No Woman No Cry” called “Everything’s Gonna be All Right” (the track was also called “Ghetto Bastard” on some explicit releases). That song detailed the experiences of Treach growing up in poverty, and now rising up to live a better life. Powered by the success of that song and “O.P.P.”, their self titled album went platinum.

Eventually, the idea of the “vibe” became more widespread, encompassing everything- the music, the people, the overall feeling of the party. Almost everyone believed in it now. Ravers believed that this entity could appear out of nowhere, much like the “Holy Spirit”, coming down upon the party and blessing it with good times.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Since 1996, tracks have remained in the mid-170 BPM range, producing what we know today as drum and bass. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand.
After all, some fans prefer artists that stick to a tried and true concert formula, playing a tune live that is indistinguishable from the studio version. Other fans want something a little more diverse. Bands that play a different set list every night, for instance.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention. What they achieve on stage is nothing short of astounding. Performed with all of the bells and whistles of a traditional electronic artist plus the addition of live instruments and vocals, the duo creates every bass ridden blast right before your eyes – without the addition of a single pre-recorded track.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because breakbeat there wasn’t one making it not even classifiable as a movement at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

The album also generated another hit, a reworking of Bob Marley’s “No Woman No Cry” called “Everything’s Gonna be All Right” (the track was also called “Ghetto Bastard” on some explicit releases). That song detailed the experiences of Treach growing up in poverty, and now rising up to live a better life. Powered by the success of that song and “O.P.P.”, their self titled album went platinum.

Eventually, the idea of the “vibe” became more widespread, encompassing everything- the music, the people, the overall feeling of the party. Almost everyone believed in it now. Ravers believed that this entity could appear out of nowhere, much like the “Holy Spirit”, coming down upon the party and blessing it with good times.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Since 1996, tracks have remained in the mid-170 BPM range, producing what we know today as drum and bass. First of all, the Hippie movement had a definite political motive.therefore it was easy to understand.
After all, some fans prefer artists that stick to a tried and true concert formula, playing a tune live that is indistinguishable from the studio version. Other fans want something a little more diverse. Bands that play a different set list every night, for instance.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Of course, EOTO’s innovative brand of live electronic music is designed for invention. What they achieve on stage is nothing short of astounding. Performed with all of the bells and whistles of a traditional electronic artist plus the addition of live instruments and vocals, the duo creates every bass ridden blast right before your eyes – without the addition of a single pre-recorded track.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because breakbeat there wasn’t one making it not even classifiable as a movement at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

The album also generated another hit, a reworking of Bob Marley’s “No Woman No Cry” called “Everything’s Gonna be All Right” (the track was also called “Ghetto Bastard” on some explicit releases). That song detailed the experiences of Treach growing up in poverty, and now rising up to live a better life. Powered by the success of that song and “O.P.P.”, their self titled album went platinum.

Eventually, the idea of the “vibe” became more widespread, encompassing everything- the music, the people, the overall feeling of the party. Almost everyone believed in it now. Ravers believed that this entity could appear out of nowhere, much like the “Holy Spirit”, coming down upon the party and blessing it with good times.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.