Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Asian drum and bass scenes include Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, and Indonesia. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. It’s not hard to piece together how or why it all started.

The Sactown summer concert season is about to hit high gear – and we’re not talking about your Green Days, your Keith Urbans, and your “Bundles of Burnouts” tours with (insert ’80s hair metal band, featuring Bo Bice).

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York. I told myself when I graduated that I wasn’t gonna get a job, a regular 9-5. I was gonna hustle and try to make my way through the grind of becoming an artist. I got really fortunate actually, with that record. When that came out, Funkmaster Flex was killing it! A lot of people thought he made the record. He was playing it every night for like 2-3 years in a row on the mix show. It was an anthem. It was big record. I was able to use that to get more work. I did a couple more records in that style, that party-breakbeat kind of thing. And then I started getting remixes and production.

Given the nature of EOTO’s live shows, do the masters of musical improvisation feel pressure to top the last show or enjoy the freedom to explore uncharted territory? Without hesitation, Hann stated that they find the inventiveness exhilarating.

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Ensure that the samples you choose will suit your style. Thus, it is very important that you keep listening to a variety of samples in order to know how each would sound. Remember, you have to express the mood you want to suggest and the emotions you want to convey on your song.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Asian drum and bass scenes include Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, and Indonesia. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. It’s not hard to piece together how or why it all started.

The Sactown summer concert season is about to hit high gear – and we’re not talking about your Green Days, your Keith Urbans, and your “Bundles of Burnouts” tours with (insert ’80s hair metal band, featuring Bo Bice).

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York. I told myself when I graduated that I wasn’t gonna get a job, a regular 9-5. I was gonna hustle and try to make my way through the grind of becoming an artist. I got really fortunate actually, with that record. When that came out, Funkmaster Flex was killing it! A lot of people thought he made the record. He was playing it every night for like 2-3 years in a row on the mix show. It was an anthem. It was big record. I was able to use that to get more work. I did a couple more records in that style, that party-breakbeat kind of thing. And then I started getting remixes and production.

Given the nature of EOTO’s live shows, do the masters of musical improvisation feel pressure to top the last show or enjoy the freedom to explore uncharted territory? Without hesitation, Hann stated that they find the inventiveness exhilarating.

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Ensure that the samples you choose will suit your style. Thus, it is very important that you keep listening to a variety of samples in order to know how each would sound. Remember, you have to express the mood you want to suggest and the emotions you want to convey on your song.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Asian drum and bass scenes include Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, and Indonesia. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. It’s not hard to piece together how or why it all started.

The Sactown summer concert season is about to hit high gear – and we’re not talking about your Green Days, your Keith Urbans, and your “Bundles of Burnouts” tours with (insert ’80s hair metal band, featuring Bo Bice).

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York. I told myself when I graduated that I wasn’t gonna get a job, a regular 9-5. I was gonna hustle and try to make my way through the grind of becoming an artist. I got really fortunate actually, with that record. When that came out, Funkmaster Flex was killing it! A lot of people thought he made the record. He was playing it every night for like 2-3 years in a row on the mix show. It was an anthem. It was big record. I was able to use that to get more work. I did a couple more records in that style, that party-breakbeat kind of thing. And then I started getting remixes and production.

Given the nature of EOTO’s live shows, do the masters of musical improvisation feel pressure to top the last show or enjoy the freedom to explore uncharted territory? Without hesitation, Hann stated that they find the inventiveness exhilarating.

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Ensure that the samples you choose will suit your style. Thus, it is very important that you keep listening to a variety of samples in order to know how each would sound. Remember, you have to express the mood you want to suggest and the emotions you want to convey on your song.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.

Asian drum and bass scenes include Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, and Indonesia. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. It’s not hard to piece together how or why it all started.

The Sactown summer concert season is about to hit high gear – and we’re not talking about your Green Days, your Keith Urbans, and your “Bundles of Burnouts” tours with (insert ’80s hair metal band, featuring Bo Bice).

Spinna: I came up with the concept for that fresh out of college. I graduated from SUNY Binghamton, upstate New York. I told myself when I graduated that I wasn’t gonna get a job, a regular 9-5. I was gonna hustle and try to make my way through the grind of becoming an artist. I got really fortunate actually, with that record. When that came out, Funkmaster Flex was killing it! A lot of people thought he made the record. He was playing it every night for like 2-3 years in a row on the mix show. It was an anthem. It was big record. I was able to use that to get more work. I did a couple more records in that style, that party-breakbeat kind of thing. And then I started getting remixes and production.

Given the nature of EOTO’s live shows, do the masters of musical improvisation feel pressure to top the last show or enjoy the freedom to explore uncharted territory? Without hesitation, Hann stated that they find the inventiveness exhilarating.

In the midst of it all, it had also become a fashion show. Not so bad, right? We saw it as a good thing. Ravers were making the clothes, so buying them was supporting “us.” The idea that the scene could support itself soon came to the forefront, quickly enticing fashion designers and promoters to invest even more. Was the scene becoming “respectable?” Was it becoming a self-supporting movement- or big business?

After taking a hiatus from hip-hop to explore house music and produce Stevie Wonder tribute shows, DJ Spinna returns with his latest album, Sonic Smash. In part one of this lengthy interview, the humble producer speaks on the 90’s NY underground scene and how Funkmaster Flex almost stole his record.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Ensure that the samples you choose will suit your style. Thus, it is very important that you keep listening to a variety of samples in order to know how each would sound. Remember, you have to express the mood you want to suggest and the emotions you want to convey on your song.

The use of top hip hop samples in music production still refuses to die. Until now, beat makers keep on utilizing tools, gathering and creating sounds, producing effects, and eventually prepare the stage for the musical satisfaction of the audience.