Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

This has become popular to knock over and was significantly used to build the basis of hip hop. And then I started getting remixes and production. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up.

DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Fellow New Jersey native Tony D, accused Naughty by Nature of stealing a sample from his breakbeat album Music Makes You Move and using it on their track “O.P.P.” The matter was settled out of court. Between albums, the group also scored a major hit with the track “Uptown Anthem”, from the soundtrack to the 1992 film Juice.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

Their first hit as Naughty by Nature was a track called “O.P.P.,” which sampled the Jackson 5’s hit “ABC” and was released in 1991 on their self-titled album Naughty by Nature. The song peaked at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 , making it one of the most successful rap songs in history to that point in terms of crossover success on the pop charts.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.

This has become popular to knock over and was significantly used to build the basis of hip hop. And then I started getting remixes and production. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up.

DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Fellow New Jersey native Tony D, accused Naughty by Nature of stealing a sample from his breakbeat album Music Makes You Move and using it on their track “O.P.P.” The matter was settled out of court. Between albums, the group also scored a major hit with the track “Uptown Anthem”, from the soundtrack to the 1992 film Juice.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

Their first hit as Naughty by Nature was a track called “O.P.P.,” which sampled the Jackson 5’s hit “ABC” and was released in 1991 on their self-titled album Naughty by Nature. The song peaked at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 , making it one of the most successful rap songs in history to that point in terms of crossover success on the pop charts.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

Interview: Dj Spinna, Pt. 1

This has become popular to knock over and was significantly used to build the basis of hip hop. And then I started getting remixes and production. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up.

DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Fellow New Jersey native Tony D, accused Naughty by Nature of stealing a sample from his breakbeat album Music Makes You Move and using it on their track “O.P.P.” The matter was settled out of court. Between albums, the group also scored a major hit with the track “Uptown Anthem”, from the soundtrack to the 1992 film Juice.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

Their first hit as Naughty by Nature was a track called “O.P.P.,” which sampled the Jackson 5’s hit “ABC” and was released in 1991 on their self-titled album Naughty by Nature. The song peaked at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 , making it one of the most successful rap songs in history to that point in terms of crossover success on the pop charts.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.

This has become popular to knock over and was significantly used to build the basis of hip hop. And then I started getting remixes and production. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up.

DJ Nysus aka Dion Freeborn of Northern Virginia — who recently opened for Superstar DJ Keoki at Shorty’s in Baltimore, and shared the bill with Stanton Warriors at DC Star — is a popular fixture in the DC/Baltimore scene and beyond.

Around 11:30 Amanda took the stage with the power and poise of Aretha reincarnated. Visually captivating in her shimmering Gold dress, she evocatively belted out covers segueing from the bands 70’s repertoire into her own song release. The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. Next was a spectacular upbeat version of the Peggy Lee classic, “Fever” played with a counterpunctal syncopated bassline and sawtooth wave synthesizer leads. And then, Amanda Davids officially unleashed her new single.

Fellow New Jersey native Tony D, accused Naughty by Nature of stealing a sample from his breakbeat album Music Makes You Move and using it on their track “O.P.P.” The matter was settled out of court. Between albums, the group also scored a major hit with the track “Uptown Anthem”, from the soundtrack to the 1992 film Juice.

Secondly let me talk a little bit about software used for creating beats. The first piece of software that I used was Cakewalk, followed by Fruit Loops Studio and finally Reason by Propellerhead. I had always liked the feel of Hardware until I got used to using software. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to using software is the price. You can get software for a third of the price you spend on hardware. If you are PC literate which a lot of the younger generation is now, it is easier to cut, copy and paste within the software. This was not as easy when using Hardware.

Their first hit as Naughty by Nature was a track called “O.P.P.,” which sampled the Jackson 5’s hit “ABC” and was released in 1991 on their self-titled album Naughty by Nature. The song peaked at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 , making it one of the most successful rap songs in history to that point in terms of crossover success on the pop charts.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

I was approached by East West [Records]. That [Das EFX “Microphone Master”] was the first official remix and I was in Kansas. I had to get the job done so I brought Joc Max in and did it with him. Everything that we did, we labeled it Domecrackers. We eventually wanted to do a project called the Domecracker Project where me and him produce the whole record. But that still has yet to come to fruition. We talk about it all the time. He’s like a best friend, actually, like a brother. I speak to him all the time even outside of the music thing. So that’s what that Domecracker thing is, me and Joc.