Jewish New Year Of Rosh Hashanah

Jewish New Year Of Rosh Hashanah

Each day from Rosh Hashanah to Yom Kippur represents all the respective days of the coming year. We “remember” our Lord the same way the Jews “remember” Passover. For a shofar to be kosher it cannot have any cracks or holes.
Rosh Hashanah is the start of the High Holy Days. It is the start of repentance. The Jewish people use the High Holy Days as a time to ask God for forgiveness and to try to make their lives better. According to the Jewish tradition, God decides who is going to live or die in the coming year. To sum it all up, Jews use this as a time to make peace with everyone they come in contact with. As Jews, we believe that God is willing to forgive people for their sins if they strive to make things better for themselves and others around them.

Spring is the second most popular, followed by fall and winter. Only about thirteen percent of weddings are held in the winter, even with Valentine’s Day! The reason for this is simple. As wedding costs continue to increase, more and more couples are planning casual, outdoor affairs. And you simply can’t do that in the dead of winter. We must also consider that teachers and other trained professionals have vacation time in the summer.

Always buy shofar from a very reputable dealer. If you do not know one, ask your rabbi or anyone who owns a shofar for recommendations. The quality of shofar would vary depending on several factors and the best thing to do would be to buy one from a trusted dealer.

For this High Holy Day, pomegranates are a favorite. This fruit has symbolic significance to the Jewish people, because the fruit contains 613 seed, which mirrors the 613 commandments (mitzvoth) that Jewish people seek to follow. Also, many see the pomegranate’s seeds as representing abundance and a reminder of the people’s obedience during the prior year.

So our first reading tonight recalls God’s commands to Moses before the Israelites observed their first Passover, the one done literally on the verge of flight from their slavery in Egypt. “The first month of the year” does not refer to the start of the Jewish calendar year; as is well known, Rosh Hashanah occurs in the fall. But Passover, in the middle of Nisan, begins the Jewish liturgical year. Their seder is a “re-presentation” of all that happened to them; they are to regard themselves as being themselves in Egypt, about to be liberated from physical slavery, ready to flee as soon as they receive the word.

Tzimmes is a favourite dish served In Ashkenazi (north European) households. Made from sweet carrots, cooked with sugar, raisins or prunes and usually served with the main course.

For America’s Muslim population, there are specific rules that govern weddings. Couples are not to be wed during the holy months of Ramadan and Muharram. The Shawwal is viewed as a propitious time to tie the knot. If you have any questions regarding Muslim observance or traditions, it is best to consult your local mosque.Secular holidays that should be avoided include the Fourth of July, Thanksgiving Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day and Super Bowl Sunday.

Be sure to consider these sensitive dates when picking out your wedding date so that every one of your guests can enjoy the special day to the fullest.

Each day from Rosh Hashanah to Yom Kippur represents all the respective days of the coming year. We “remember” our Lord the same way the Jews “remember” Passover. For a shofar to be kosher it cannot have any cracks or holes.
Rosh Hashanah is the start of the High Holy Days. It is the start of repentance. The Jewish people use the High Holy Days as a time to ask God for forgiveness and to try to make their lives better. According to the Jewish tradition, God decides who is going to live or die in the coming year. To sum it all up, Jews use this as a time to make peace with everyone they come in contact with. As Jews, we believe that God is willing to forgive people for their sins if they strive to make things better for themselves and others around them.

Spring is the second most popular, followed by fall and winter. Only about thirteen percent of weddings are held in the winter, even with Valentine’s Day! The reason for this is simple. As wedding costs continue to increase, more and more couples are planning casual, outdoor affairs. And you simply can’t do that in the dead of winter. We must also consider that teachers and other trained professionals have vacation time in the summer.

Always buy shofar from a very reputable dealer. If you do not know one, ask your rabbi or anyone who owns a shofar for recommendations. The quality of shofar would vary depending on several factors and the best thing to do would be to buy one from a trusted dealer.

For this High Holy Day, pomegranates are a favorite. This fruit has symbolic significance to the Jewish people, because the fruit contains 613 seed, which mirrors the 613 commandments (mitzvoth) that Jewish people seek to follow. Also, many see the pomegranate’s seeds as representing abundance and a reminder of the people’s obedience during the prior year.

So our first reading tonight recalls God’s commands to Moses before the Israelites observed their first Passover, the one done literally on the verge of flight from their slavery in Egypt. “The first month of the year” does not refer to the start of the Jewish calendar year; as is well known, Rosh Hashanah occurs in the fall. But Passover, in the middle of Nisan, begins the Jewish liturgical year. Their seder is a “re-presentation” of all that happened to them; they are to regard themselves as being themselves in Egypt, about to be liberated from physical slavery, ready to flee as soon as they receive the word.

Tzimmes is a favourite dish served In Ashkenazi (north European) households. Made from sweet carrots, cooked with sugar, raisins or prunes and usually served with the main course.

For America’s Muslim population, there are specific rules that govern weddings. Couples are not to be wed during the holy months of Ramadan and Muharram. The Shawwal is viewed as a propitious time to tie the knot. If you have any questions regarding Muslim observance or traditions, it is best to consult your local mosque.Secular holidays that should be avoided include the Fourth of July, Thanksgiving Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day and Super Bowl Sunday.

Be sure to consider these sensitive dates when picking out your wedding date so that every one of your guests can enjoy the special day to the fullest.