Lee Avenue In Williamsburg Kicks Off Jewish Holidays

Lee Avenue In Williamsburg Kicks Off Jewish Holidays

As the traditions of this High Holy Day develop so did the various food customs associated with the holiday. The High Holy Days would lose their meaning if the experience is not carried forward to the days ahead.
Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year – literally translated it means “head of the year” or “first of the year.” It is a time for reflection on the past and preparing for the future. It is a religious holiday for the Jewish community and is celebrated on the first and second days of Tishri. Rosh Hashanah is a day of rest, casting off the old year and making wishes for a sweet new year to come. As one of the High Holy Days, it is important to teach children the meaning of Rosh Hashanah and how to celebrate it properly. One way is to use Rosh Hashanah coloring pages for kids so you can explain the meanings behind the pictures. Below are several websites that offer children’s coloring pages for Rosh Hashanah so you can share this holiday with your child.

Meditation: After the priest opens Mass this evening “in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit,” he will not say “the Mass is ended” until Saturday evening. Tonight begins the most important liturgy of the year, the Paschal Triduum, which in truth lasts for three days: Holy Thursday, Good Friday and finally the Easter Vigil on the evening of Holy Saturday. We depart in silence tonight, return and leave in sorrowful silence tomorrow and gather in silence once more – though with great expectation – as the sun departs on Saturday. The Passover of our Lord is here.

September has a couple of holidays you should look out for. Labor Day is the first Monday in September. This might be a great time to have your wedding and take advantage of the extra day off. If you plan to have our wedding around Labor Day, just make sure to note that with your wedding invitation as some might not realize the date of the holiday.

While I do believe that God has a hand in our destiny, I also believe that we were given free choice about how – and possibly when – we create that destiny. In other words, I believe that the choices we make get us to that destiny. I also believe we are cocreators of our lives, the combination of our thoughts, feelings and actions manifesting the things we experience day to day. That said, we are all cocreating, and sometimes – maybe more often than we would like – our manifestations collide creating a fair amount of chaos. In any case, we constantly experience a combination of destiny or fate and conscious or subconscious creation and cocreation.

On Rosh Hashanah, at the beginning of the year we begin the process of introspection – looking back over the year and beginning to conceptualize what we want in the New Year. By the time Yom Kippur draws to a close, we have clarified our desires in all areas of our life. We have written them in fine detail as if they had already happened – in the past tense. And, like the scribes of old who blotted the ink to “seal it,” we do the same and then close the book.

Honey is probably the main sweet food associated with the Jewish New Year. On the first night challah and apples are dipped with honey. A prayer is then said asking God for a sweet year.

Tzedakah boxes come in all shapes and sizes. Some simply look like traditional piggy banks and others ornate boxes. For your child’s crafted box, they can use a shoe box, coffee can, cardboard sugar dispenser, or other containers with a lid. Have your child decorate the exterior of the container with traditional Jewish symbols, such as the shofar. Stickers, paper and paints are all good choices. Once their box is decorated, make sure that a hole or slit is cut in the lid. In the case of the sugar dispenser, you can simply expose the opening. With their box complete, give your child, depending on their age, real or toy coins to fill their box.

In the dining room, let your children create special placeholders for each guest. If you have time and money, take your children to a pottery store to paint their own kiddush cups. You also can buy simple metal goblets from a home store and have your children decorate the stems.

As the traditions of this High Holy Day develop so did the various food customs associated with the holiday. The High Holy Days would lose their meaning if the experience is not carried forward to the days ahead.
Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year – literally translated it means “head of the year” or “first of the year.” It is a time for reflection on the past and preparing for the future. It is a religious holiday for the Jewish community and is celebrated on the first and second days of Tishri. Rosh Hashanah is a day of rest, casting off the old year and making wishes for a sweet new year to come. As one of the High Holy Days, it is important to teach children the meaning of Rosh Hashanah and how to celebrate it properly. One way is to use Rosh Hashanah coloring pages for kids so you can explain the meanings behind the pictures. Below are several websites that offer children’s coloring pages for Rosh Hashanah so you can share this holiday with your child.

Meditation: After the priest opens Mass this evening “in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit,” he will not say “the Mass is ended” until Saturday evening. Tonight begins the most important liturgy of the year, the Paschal Triduum, which in truth lasts for three days: Holy Thursday, Good Friday and finally the Easter Vigil on the evening of Holy Saturday. We depart in silence tonight, return and leave in sorrowful silence tomorrow and gather in silence once more – though with great expectation – as the sun departs on Saturday. The Passover of our Lord is here.

September has a couple of holidays you should look out for. Labor Day is the first Monday in September. This might be a great time to have your wedding and take advantage of the extra day off. If you plan to have our wedding around Labor Day, just make sure to note that with your wedding invitation as some might not realize the date of the holiday.

While I do believe that God has a hand in our destiny, I also believe that we were given free choice about how – and possibly when – we create that destiny. In other words, I believe that the choices we make get us to that destiny. I also believe we are cocreators of our lives, the combination of our thoughts, feelings and actions manifesting the things we experience day to day. That said, we are all cocreating, and sometimes – maybe more often than we would like – our manifestations collide creating a fair amount of chaos. In any case, we constantly experience a combination of destiny or fate and conscious or subconscious creation and cocreation.

On Rosh Hashanah, at the beginning of the year we begin the process of introspection – looking back over the year and beginning to conceptualize what we want in the New Year. By the time Yom Kippur draws to a close, we have clarified our desires in all areas of our life. We have written them in fine detail as if they had already happened – in the past tense. And, like the scribes of old who blotted the ink to “seal it,” we do the same and then close the book.

Honey is probably the main sweet food associated with the Jewish New Year. On the first night challah and apples are dipped with honey. A prayer is then said asking God for a sweet year.

Tzedakah boxes come in all shapes and sizes. Some simply look like traditional piggy banks and others ornate boxes. For your child’s crafted box, they can use a shoe box, coffee can, cardboard sugar dispenser, or other containers with a lid. Have your child decorate the exterior of the container with traditional Jewish symbols, such as the shofar. Stickers, paper and paints are all good choices. Once their box is decorated, make sure that a hole or slit is cut in the lid. In the case of the sugar dispenser, you can simply expose the opening. With their box complete, give your child, depending on their age, real or toy coins to fill their box.

In the dining room, let your children create special placeholders for each guest. If you have time and money, take your children to a pottery store to paint their own kiddush cups. You also can buy simple metal goblets from a home store and have your children decorate the stems.

Lee Avenue In Williamsburg Kicks Off Jewish Holidays

Lee Avenue In Williamsburg Kicks Off Jewish Holidays

As the traditions of this High Holy Day develop so did the various food customs associated with the holiday. The High Holy Days would lose their meaning if the experience is not carried forward to the days ahead.
Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year – literally translated it means “head of the year” or “first of the year.” It is a time for reflection on the past and preparing for the future. It is a religious holiday for the Jewish community and is celebrated on the first and second days of Tishri. Rosh Hashanah is a day of rest, casting off the old year and making wishes for a sweet new year to come. As one of the High Holy Days, it is important to teach children the meaning of Rosh Hashanah and how to celebrate it properly. One way is to use Rosh Hashanah coloring pages for kids so you can explain the meanings behind the pictures. Below are several websites that offer children’s coloring pages for Rosh Hashanah so you can share this holiday with your child.

Meditation: After the priest opens Mass this evening “in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit,” he will not say “the Mass is ended” until Saturday evening. Tonight begins the most important liturgy of the year, the Paschal Triduum, which in truth lasts for three days: Holy Thursday, Good Friday and finally the Easter Vigil on the evening of Holy Saturday. We depart in silence tonight, return and leave in sorrowful silence tomorrow and gather in silence once more – though with great expectation – as the sun departs on Saturday. The Passover of our Lord is here.

September has a couple of holidays you should look out for. Labor Day is the first Monday in September. This might be a great time to have your wedding and take advantage of the extra day off. If you plan to have our wedding around Labor Day, just make sure to note that with your wedding invitation as some might not realize the date of the holiday.

While I do believe that God has a hand in our destiny, I also believe that we were given free choice about how – and possibly when – we create that destiny. In other words, I believe that the choices we make get us to that destiny. I also believe we are cocreators of our lives, the combination of our thoughts, feelings and actions manifesting the things we experience day to day. That said, we are all cocreating, and sometimes – maybe more often than we would like – our manifestations collide creating a fair amount of chaos. In any case, we constantly experience a combination of destiny or fate and conscious or subconscious creation and cocreation.

On Rosh Hashanah, at the beginning of the year we begin the process of introspection – looking back over the year and beginning to conceptualize what we want in the New Year. By the time Yom Kippur draws to a close, we have clarified our desires in all areas of our life. We have written them in fine detail as if they had already happened – in the past tense. And, like the scribes of old who blotted the ink to “seal it,” we do the same and then close the book.

Honey is probably the main sweet food associated with the Jewish New Year. On the first night challah and apples are dipped with honey. A prayer is then said asking God for a sweet year.

Tzedakah boxes come in all shapes and sizes. Some simply look like traditional piggy banks and others ornate boxes. For your child’s crafted box, they can use a shoe box, coffee can, cardboard sugar dispenser, or other containers with a lid. Have your child decorate the exterior of the container with traditional Jewish symbols, such as the shofar. Stickers, paper and paints are all good choices. Once their box is decorated, make sure that a hole or slit is cut in the lid. In the case of the sugar dispenser, you can simply expose the opening. With their box complete, give your child, depending on their age, real or toy coins to fill their box.

In the dining room, let your children create special placeholders for each guest. If you have time and money, take your children to a pottery store to paint their own kiddush cups. You also can buy simple metal goblets from a home store and have your children decorate the stems.

As the traditions of this High Holy Day develop so did the various food customs associated with the holiday. The High Holy Days would lose their meaning if the experience is not carried forward to the days ahead.
Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year – literally translated it means “head of the year” or “first of the year.” It is a time for reflection on the past and preparing for the future. It is a religious holiday for the Jewish community and is celebrated on the first and second days of Tishri. Rosh Hashanah is a day of rest, casting off the old year and making wishes for a sweet new year to come. As one of the High Holy Days, it is important to teach children the meaning of Rosh Hashanah and how to celebrate it properly. One way is to use Rosh Hashanah coloring pages for kids so you can explain the meanings behind the pictures. Below are several websites that offer children’s coloring pages for Rosh Hashanah so you can share this holiday with your child.

Meditation: After the priest opens Mass this evening “in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit,” he will not say “the Mass is ended” until Saturday evening. Tonight begins the most important liturgy of the year, the Paschal Triduum, which in truth lasts for three days: Holy Thursday, Good Friday and finally the Easter Vigil on the evening of Holy Saturday. We depart in silence tonight, return and leave in sorrowful silence tomorrow and gather in silence once more – though with great expectation – as the sun departs on Saturday. The Passover of our Lord is here.

September has a couple of holidays you should look out for. Labor Day is the first Monday in September. This might be a great time to have your wedding and take advantage of the extra day off. If you plan to have our wedding around Labor Day, just make sure to note that with your wedding invitation as some might not realize the date of the holiday.

While I do believe that God has a hand in our destiny, I also believe that we were given free choice about how – and possibly when – we create that destiny. In other words, I believe that the choices we make get us to that destiny. I also believe we are cocreators of our lives, the combination of our thoughts, feelings and actions manifesting the things we experience day to day. That said, we are all cocreating, and sometimes – maybe more often than we would like – our manifestations collide creating a fair amount of chaos. In any case, we constantly experience a combination of destiny or fate and conscious or subconscious creation and cocreation.

On Rosh Hashanah, at the beginning of the year we begin the process of introspection – looking back over the year and beginning to conceptualize what we want in the New Year. By the time Yom Kippur draws to a close, we have clarified our desires in all areas of our life. We have written them in fine detail as if they had already happened – in the past tense. And, like the scribes of old who blotted the ink to “seal it,” we do the same and then close the book.

Honey is probably the main sweet food associated with the Jewish New Year. On the first night challah and apples are dipped with honey. A prayer is then said asking God for a sweet year.

Tzedakah boxes come in all shapes and sizes. Some simply look like traditional piggy banks and others ornate boxes. For your child’s crafted box, they can use a shoe box, coffee can, cardboard sugar dispenser, or other containers with a lid. Have your child decorate the exterior of the container with traditional Jewish symbols, such as the shofar. Stickers, paper and paints are all good choices. Once their box is decorated, make sure that a hole or slit is cut in the lid. In the case of the sugar dispenser, you can simply expose the opening. With their box complete, give your child, depending on their age, real or toy coins to fill their box.

In the dining room, let your children create special placeholders for each guest. If you have time and money, take your children to a pottery store to paint their own kiddush cups. You also can buy simple metal goblets from a home store and have your children decorate the stems.