My Personal Experience With Rosh Hashanah

My Personal Experience With Rosh Hashanah

The other shofar was made of a ram’s horn ornamented with silver. To reduce the smell of bleach as much as possible, the shofars must be rinsed thoroughly in clear water and wiped dry. Numbers like these are the ones that create problems.
The summer is winding down, the school year is gearing up, and you want to throw a party. Lucky for you, September is chock-full of reasons why you should invite people over.

Let the finished dough loaf sit out at room temperature for another 45 minutes and brush on an egg wash and sprinkle poppy or sesame seeds if desired. Bake for 35 to 45 minutes at 375 degrees Fahrenheit until golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool on a wire rack.

Next, mix together the rolled oats, flour, cinnamon, brown sugar and salt. Cut in the 1/3 cup of butter till the mixture looks a bit like bread crumbs. Sprinkle this over the top of the apples. Heat oven to 375 degrees and bake for up to 50 minutes or until the top is brown.

Chef Slauterbeck has experience making traditional Jewish foods, and he created a special Rosh Hashanah menu in September that was received well by food lovers in the Chicago area.

Before buying a shofar you should always test it for quality. Remember that if a shofar has a crack or is damaged in any manner, it would not provide you with good results. You can fill it up with water to see if it leaks. If it does, it is not of good quality.

We start out the holiday by saying prayers. While I know certain Hebrew phrases, I am by no means an expert at saying prayers and I have a limited amount of ability in speaking in Hebrew. Still, I listen to my mother read the prayers from her Siddur (prayer book) in Hebrew every year and I follow along in English. You see, my mother went to Hebrew school for many years as a child and learned how to read the Hebrew alphabet.

This rendition captures the heart of Chassidic philosophy. Responsibility for our actions and our future are dependent on man, not G-d. It is we who ultimately determine our fate.

The other shofar was made of a ram’s horn ornamented with silver. To reduce the smell of bleach as much as possible, the shofars must be rinsed thoroughly in clear water and wiped dry. Numbers like these are the ones that create problems.
The summer is winding down, the school year is gearing up, and you want to throw a party. Lucky for you, September is chock-full of reasons why you should invite people over.

Let the finished dough loaf sit out at room temperature for another 45 minutes and brush on an egg wash and sprinkle poppy or sesame seeds if desired. Bake for 35 to 45 minutes at 375 degrees Fahrenheit until golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool on a wire rack.

Next, mix together the rolled oats, flour, cinnamon, brown sugar and salt. Cut in the 1/3 cup of butter till the mixture looks a bit like bread crumbs. Sprinkle this over the top of the apples. Heat oven to 375 degrees and bake for up to 50 minutes or until the top is brown.

Chef Slauterbeck has experience making traditional Jewish foods, and he created a special Rosh Hashanah menu in September that was received well by food lovers in the Chicago area.

Before buying a shofar you should always test it for quality. Remember that if a shofar has a crack or is damaged in any manner, it would not provide you with good results. You can fill it up with water to see if it leaks. If it does, it is not of good quality.

We start out the holiday by saying prayers. While I know certain Hebrew phrases, I am by no means an expert at saying prayers and I have a limited amount of ability in speaking in Hebrew. Still, I listen to my mother read the prayers from her Siddur (prayer book) in Hebrew every year and I follow along in English. You see, my mother went to Hebrew school for many years as a child and learned how to read the Hebrew alphabet.

This rendition captures the heart of Chassidic philosophy. Responsibility for our actions and our future are dependent on man, not G-d. It is we who ultimately determine our fate.

My Personal Experience With Rosh Hashanah

My Personal Experience With Rosh Hashanah

The other shofar was made of a ram’s horn ornamented with silver. To reduce the smell of bleach as much as possible, the shofars must be rinsed thoroughly in clear water and wiped dry. Numbers like these are the ones that create problems.
The summer is winding down, the school year is gearing up, and you want to throw a party. Lucky for you, September is chock-full of reasons why you should invite people over.

Let the finished dough loaf sit out at room temperature for another 45 minutes and brush on an egg wash and sprinkle poppy or sesame seeds if desired. Bake for 35 to 45 minutes at 375 degrees Fahrenheit until golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool on a wire rack.

Next, mix together the rolled oats, flour, cinnamon, brown sugar and salt. Cut in the 1/3 cup of butter till the mixture looks a bit like bread crumbs. Sprinkle this over the top of the apples. Heat oven to 375 degrees and bake for up to 50 minutes or until the top is brown.

Chef Slauterbeck has experience making traditional Jewish foods, and he created a special Rosh Hashanah menu in September that was received well by food lovers in the Chicago area.

Before buying a shofar you should always test it for quality. Remember that if a shofar has a crack or is damaged in any manner, it would not provide you with good results. You can fill it up with water to see if it leaks. If it does, it is not of good quality.

We start out the holiday by saying prayers. While I know certain Hebrew phrases, I am by no means an expert at saying prayers and I have a limited amount of ability in speaking in Hebrew. Still, I listen to my mother read the prayers from her Siddur (prayer book) in Hebrew every year and I follow along in English. You see, my mother went to Hebrew school for many years as a child and learned how to read the Hebrew alphabet.

This rendition captures the heart of Chassidic philosophy. Responsibility for our actions and our future are dependent on man, not G-d. It is we who ultimately determine our fate.

The other shofar was made of a ram’s horn ornamented with silver. To reduce the smell of bleach as much as possible, the shofars must be rinsed thoroughly in clear water and wiped dry. Numbers like these are the ones that create problems.
The summer is winding down, the school year is gearing up, and you want to throw a party. Lucky for you, September is chock-full of reasons why you should invite people over.

Let the finished dough loaf sit out at room temperature for another 45 minutes and brush on an egg wash and sprinkle poppy or sesame seeds if desired. Bake for 35 to 45 minutes at 375 degrees Fahrenheit until golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool on a wire rack.

Next, mix together the rolled oats, flour, cinnamon, brown sugar and salt. Cut in the 1/3 cup of butter till the mixture looks a bit like bread crumbs. Sprinkle this over the top of the apples. Heat oven to 375 degrees and bake for up to 50 minutes or until the top is brown.

Chef Slauterbeck has experience making traditional Jewish foods, and he created a special Rosh Hashanah menu in September that was received well by food lovers in the Chicago area.

Before buying a shofar you should always test it for quality. Remember that if a shofar has a crack or is damaged in any manner, it would not provide you with good results. You can fill it up with water to see if it leaks. If it does, it is not of good quality.

We start out the holiday by saying prayers. While I know certain Hebrew phrases, I am by no means an expert at saying prayers and I have a limited amount of ability in speaking in Hebrew. Still, I listen to my mother read the prayers from her Siddur (prayer book) in Hebrew every year and I follow along in English. You see, my mother went to Hebrew school for many years as a child and learned how to read the Hebrew alphabet.

This rendition captures the heart of Chassidic philosophy. Responsibility for our actions and our future are dependent on man, not G-d. It is we who ultimately determine our fate.