Naughty By Nature Tickets : The Trio Able To Balance Success On The Pop With Hardcore Rap

Naughty By Nature Tickets : The Trio Able To Balance Success On The Pop With Hardcore Rap

It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100. The sound of it has been generally called a four to the floor kick beat and bass line with off-beat grabber style.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Julian Marley, the son of the legendary Bob Marley, will be performing songs from his latest release, Awake, a collaboration with the Ghetto Youths International production team founded by siblings Stephen and Ziggy.

The decor at Dazzling on King street was abuzz just the same with it’s pastel cream friezes alight with ethereal but ebulliant colours emanating from stealthily stowed colourful LED lights. I spoke to the promoter of the night, entitled “Sake and Soul”, an energetic guy named “Ace” who exclaimed “this will be good, every single table has been booked.” The house band played on. “Sake and Soul”, a reference to the 70’s soul covers typically twisted by the house band into a modern pallette of mash-ups while patrons dine from a menu of pan-asian fusion dishes has been an ongoing fixture of Toronto’s King street scene for over a year now.

So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. By Hardware I mean physical Drum Machines, Samplers and Keyboards/Workstations that you touch and play with your hands. I first started out with a DR-660 drum machine about 18 years ago. This was my first piece of “real” studio equipment. Before then I was just using breakbeat records on turntables and recording over a home stereo. This drum machine had stocks sounds that could be manipulated with effects like reverb and flange but you could not add sounds. You could however record patterns and then arrange those patterns into songs. I was able to learn a lot by using that drum machine and it was good to be able to play the pads to hear and record the sounds.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.

It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100. The sound of it has been generally called a four to the floor kick beat and bass line with off-beat grabber style.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Julian Marley, the son of the legendary Bob Marley, will be performing songs from his latest release, Awake, a collaboration with the Ghetto Youths International production team founded by siblings Stephen and Ziggy.

The decor at Dazzling on King street was abuzz just the same with it’s pastel cream friezes alight with ethereal but ebulliant colours emanating from stealthily stowed colourful LED lights. I spoke to the promoter of the night, entitled “Sake and Soul”, an energetic guy named “Ace” who exclaimed “this will be good, every single table has been booked.” The house band played on. “Sake and Soul”, a reference to the 70’s soul covers typically twisted by the house band into a modern pallette of mash-ups while patrons dine from a menu of pan-asian fusion dishes has been an ongoing fixture of Toronto’s King street scene for over a year now.

So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. By Hardware I mean physical Drum Machines, Samplers and Keyboards/Workstations that you touch and play with your hands. I first started out with a DR-660 drum machine about 18 years ago. This was my first piece of “real” studio equipment. Before then I was just using breakbeat records on turntables and recording over a home stereo. This drum machine had stocks sounds that could be manipulated with effects like reverb and flange but you could not add sounds. You could however record patterns and then arrange those patterns into songs. I was able to learn a lot by using that drum machine and it was good to be able to play the pads to hear and record the sounds.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.

Naughty By Nature Tickets : The Trio Able To Balance Success On The Pop With Hardcore Rap

Naughty By Nature Tickets : The Trio Able To Balance Success On The Pop With Hardcore Rap

It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100. The sound of it has been generally called a four to the floor kick beat and bass line with off-beat grabber style.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Julian Marley, the son of the legendary Bob Marley, will be performing songs from his latest release, Awake, a collaboration with the Ghetto Youths International production team founded by siblings Stephen and Ziggy.

The decor at Dazzling on King street was abuzz just the same with it’s pastel cream friezes alight with ethereal but ebulliant colours emanating from stealthily stowed colourful LED lights. I spoke to the promoter of the night, entitled “Sake and Soul”, an energetic guy named “Ace” who exclaimed “this will be good, every single table has been booked.” The house band played on. “Sake and Soul”, a reference to the 70’s soul covers typically twisted by the house band into a modern pallette of mash-ups while patrons dine from a menu of pan-asian fusion dishes has been an ongoing fixture of Toronto’s King street scene for over a year now.

So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. By Hardware I mean physical Drum Machines, Samplers and Keyboards/Workstations that you touch and play with your hands. I first started out with a DR-660 drum machine about 18 years ago. This was my first piece of “real” studio equipment. Before then I was just using breakbeat records on turntables and recording over a home stereo. This drum machine had stocks sounds that could be manipulated with effects like reverb and flange but you could not add sounds. You could however record patterns and then arrange those patterns into songs. I was able to learn a lot by using that drum machine and it was good to be able to play the pads to hear and record the sounds.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.

It also spawned a hit song in “Feel Me Flow” which peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100. The sound of it has been generally called a four to the floor kick beat and bass line with off-beat grabber style.
The night was abuzz with speculation. What kind of song will this release be. Amanda Davids has a reputation for fusing funk, soul, hip-hop and RnB with classical music, latin jazz and hints of bebop. Will it be soulful? Will it be funky? Will it have the prodigious grand piano we typically hear from her, or will it have hints of the Hammond B-3 she has absorbed from her teacher, jazz great, Tony Monaco.

The Rave scene, however, is much harder to pinpoint a motive to. Many have believed that is because there wasn’t one- making it not even classifiable as a “movement” at all. This couldn’t be further from the truth-it’s just hard for anthropologists to understand that the motive was “SIMPLY MUSIC.” This single fact puts the ‘Rave” movement closer to the early 20th century American Jazz movement- than the hippies. Folks had a hard time understanding jazz, too- provoking Louie Armstrong to his famous quote, “If you have to ask- you’ll never know.” Certainly, this is also true for the “Rave” scene.

Julian Marley, the son of the legendary Bob Marley, will be performing songs from his latest release, Awake, a collaboration with the Ghetto Youths International production team founded by siblings Stephen and Ziggy.

The decor at Dazzling on King street was abuzz just the same with it’s pastel cream friezes alight with ethereal but ebulliant colours emanating from stealthily stowed colourful LED lights. I spoke to the promoter of the night, entitled “Sake and Soul”, an energetic guy named “Ace” who exclaimed “this will be good, every single table has been booked.” The house band played on. “Sake and Soul”, a reference to the 70’s soul covers typically twisted by the house band into a modern pallette of mash-ups while patrons dine from a menu of pan-asian fusion dishes has been an ongoing fixture of Toronto’s King street scene for over a year now.

So let me talk a little bit about the Hardware side. By Hardware I mean physical Drum Machines, Samplers and Keyboards/Workstations that you touch and play with your hands. I first started out with a DR-660 drum machine about 18 years ago. This was my first piece of “real” studio equipment. Before then I was just using breakbeat records on turntables and recording over a home stereo. This drum machine had stocks sounds that could be manipulated with effects like reverb and flange but you could not add sounds. You could however record patterns and then arrange those patterns into songs. I was able to learn a lot by using that drum machine and it was good to be able to play the pads to hear and record the sounds.

I love how the Afrika Bambaata a capella sounds over the Plump DJ’s Shifting Gears mix a lot. Also really like the way the Candi Station and Bounce a capellas sounded over top of Sketch’s Pentangle. But my favorite is the Love Commandments a capella over top of the Boy 8-Bit Cricket Scores track.

If hard and punk rock isn’t the right tune for Sunday evening, then head down the street to The Five Spot to hear some New Orleans-bred funk! Water Seed is putting together an awesome show to highlight their soulful and funky ways at the best spot for funk concerts. Opening up for this band will be Kev Choice, emcee and pianist with a jazz and soul influence, and another New Orleans native Casme’ providing some fun and soulful tunes.