Naughty By Nature Tickets : The Trio Able To Balance Success On The Pop With Hardcore Rap

Naughty By Nature Tickets : The Trio Able To Balance Success On The Pop With Hardcore Rap

The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?
After all, some fans prefer artists that stick to a tried and true concert formula, playing a tune live that is indistinguishable from the studio version. Other fans want something a little more diverse. Bands that play a different set list every night, for instance.

I am happiest with the response and how many people have been inspired by it. Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. I think that if you can open up someone to your genre, then you have done your job perfectly and possibly made a new fan.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

After the release of Nineteen Naughty Nine: Nature’s Fury, a dispute regarding finances developed between Kay Gee and Treach, with Treach blaming Kay Gee for squandering the group’s finances. Due to these disagreements DJ Kay Gee decided to leave Naughty by Nature in late 2000. He started to develop his own record label Divine Mill. The remainder of the group, Treach and Vin Rock, released an album in 2002 called IIcons, using a variety of different producers including Da Beatminerz; the album, however, received a lukewarm reception from the public. IIcons is their last album to date.

The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?
After all, some fans prefer artists that stick to a tried and true concert formula, playing a tune live that is indistinguishable from the studio version. Other fans want something a little more diverse. Bands that play a different set list every night, for instance.

I am happiest with the response and how many people have been inspired by it. Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. I think that if you can open up someone to your genre, then you have done your job perfectly and possibly made a new fan.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

After the release of Nineteen Naughty Nine: Nature’s Fury, a dispute regarding finances developed between Kay Gee and Treach, with Treach blaming Kay Gee for squandering the group’s finances. Due to these disagreements DJ Kay Gee decided to leave Naughty by Nature in late 2000. He started to develop his own record label Divine Mill. The remainder of the group, Treach and Vin Rock, released an album in 2002 called IIcons, using a variety of different producers including Da Beatminerz; the album, however, received a lukewarm reception from the public. IIcons is their last album to date.

Naughty By Nature Tickets : The Trio Able To Balance Success On The Pop With Hardcore Rap

Naughty By Nature Tickets : The Trio Able To Balance Success On The Pop With Hardcore Rap

The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?
After all, some fans prefer artists that stick to a tried and true concert formula, playing a tune live that is indistinguishable from the studio version. Other fans want something a little more diverse. Bands that play a different set list every night, for instance.

I am happiest with the response and how many people have been inspired by it. Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. I think that if you can open up someone to your genre, then you have done your job perfectly and possibly made a new fan.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

After the release of Nineteen Naughty Nine: Nature’s Fury, a dispute regarding finances developed between Kay Gee and Treach, with Treach blaming Kay Gee for squandering the group’s finances. Due to these disagreements DJ Kay Gee decided to leave Naughty by Nature in late 2000. He started to develop his own record label Divine Mill. The remainder of the group, Treach and Vin Rock, released an album in 2002 called IIcons, using a variety of different producers including Da Beatminerz; the album, however, received a lukewarm reception from the public. IIcons is their last album to date.

The band powered through with a unique arrangment of James Brown’s “I got Soul”, befitting the night perfectly. But you got your first big break with the record, “Everybody Bounce.” Can you tell me about that?
After all, some fans prefer artists that stick to a tried and true concert formula, playing a tune live that is indistinguishable from the studio version. Other fans want something a little more diverse. Bands that play a different set list every night, for instance.

I am happiest with the response and how many people have been inspired by it. Hearing “I don’t listen to breaks and never really liked it before I heard your CD” is really what it is all about for me. I think that if you can open up someone to your genre, then you have done your job perfectly and possibly made a new fan.

So I went out and bought a Gemini “DJ in a Box” set-up. I think it came with two Gemini XL 500 tables and a little Scratch mixer. I think it even came with a “low profile” baseball cap, which to this day cracks me up. Needless to say it was a terrible set-up, which is actually perfect to learn on. Locked myself in a room for around six months and started putting out mixes and never really stopped since — which also cracks me up.

Looking back, I guess the funniest thing about Ravers creating their own religion-was that even those at the forefront of it, couldn’t explain it. Go figure, half the time we could barely talk (lol). My opinion on the religious aspect?- There definitely was.”something.” Was it the drugs which created this awe-inspiring feeling of “togetherness?” Or again, was it the shear power of the masses coming together? Certainly history shows us that when large crowds come together; there will be some sort of mutual feeling shared. Look at the flock to Mecca, the ability of Hitler to brainwash, Jonestown, or even just local churches. There are hundreds of examples.

Most of the “clubs” were just one room warehouses with a couple pool tables-but ALWAYS- had the best damn DJ you ever heard, spinning this “new” music. There were always couches available, for when you fell to your “personal journey.” The dancing style we think of today hadn’t evolved yet- you just closed your eyes and did whatever the music made you do. Noone judged you. It was your “journey.” We all had our own to deal with.

Tight as a drum and relentlessly upbeat, Same As He Ever Was is an irresistible progression of electro breakbeat fun that guarantees temporary amnesia from the insanity known as the real world.

Some even believed it was becoming a real “religion.” Perhaps it was the visions of too much acid and ecstasy- “candy-flippin”, when you mixed the two together. Perhaps it was simply the power of thousands of vast oceans of ravers, coming together at huge weekend festivals-but yes..

After the release of Nineteen Naughty Nine: Nature’s Fury, a dispute regarding finances developed between Kay Gee and Treach, with Treach blaming Kay Gee for squandering the group’s finances. Due to these disagreements DJ Kay Gee decided to leave Naughty by Nature in late 2000. He started to develop his own record label Divine Mill. The remainder of the group, Treach and Vin Rock, released an album in 2002 called IIcons, using a variety of different producers including Da Beatminerz; the album, however, received a lukewarm reception from the public. IIcons is their last album to date.