Planning A Successful Rosh Hashanah 2012

Planning A Successful Rosh Hashanah 2012

Yom Kippur (September 28, this year) is when Jewish people celebrate the Day of Atonement. Still in many parts of the world New Year’s Day falls on a day other then the first of January. The brisket will be served with red cabbage and potato kugel.
The New Year is a time to reflect upon the past, while looking forward to the future. It has been so since the early Romans, who dedicated the first day of the New Year to theirGod, Janus, keeper of the gate and the door.

Not the rest of the year. Attend Shabbat services or any minor holiday free of charge. That’s fine. But on those large important holidays – the two that make up what we know as the High Holy Days or High Holidays – you can only come in the doors of the sanctuary with a ticket.

Pepper some autumn flavors in your reception menu. A salad with roasted pumpkin seeds or a butternut squash soup can be a perfect start to an autumn meal. Entrees should be hot and hearty to keep your guests warm during the start of this chilly season. A coffee bar might be a nice touch to enjoy with your wedding cake, too.

Get your children involved. Too often, children aren’t involved in Jewish holiday preparation except Purim, which is a costume-clad holiday with similarities to Halloween. This year, have your children prepare parts of Rosh Hashanah. In the kitchen, they can cut the apples and pour the honey into little cups. Let them rip up a challah for honey-dipping. With supervision, they can braise the brisket.

And we can do the same every day of every year. We can write our own page in the Book of Life today, tomorrow, next week, next month, next year. How do we accomplish this? By reviewing our actions and goals from the last year, noticing where we fell short of achieving our desired outcomes and then setting new targets for the new year. However, we must take another step: We must write on the blank pages of the book by visualizing our new goals in fine detail and feeling exactly what it would be like if we had already manifested these results. In other words, we must imagine the life we want, the behaviors to which we aspire as if they had been published in that book – sealed, already done, accomplished.

September is also back to school time. If you’re planning on including children as flower girls or ring bearers, you should talk to their parents early to make sure they can make it to your wedding.

Park East has some very interesting Kosher food items like the Zomick’s Butter Cream Layer Cake for $14.98, Mini Broccoli Knish, package of 8 for $3.98 or Potato Pudding from Tray for $5.98 lb.

Yom Kippur (September 28, this year) is when Jewish people celebrate the Day of Atonement. Still in many parts of the world New Year’s Day falls on a day other then the first of January. The brisket will be served with red cabbage and potato kugel.
The New Year is a time to reflect upon the past, while looking forward to the future. It has been so since the early Romans, who dedicated the first day of the New Year to theirGod, Janus, keeper of the gate and the door.

Not the rest of the year. Attend Shabbat services or any minor holiday free of charge. That’s fine. But on those large important holidays – the two that make up what we know as the High Holy Days or High Holidays – you can only come in the doors of the sanctuary with a ticket.

Pepper some autumn flavors in your reception menu. A salad with roasted pumpkin seeds or a butternut squash soup can be a perfect start to an autumn meal. Entrees should be hot and hearty to keep your guests warm during the start of this chilly season. A coffee bar might be a nice touch to enjoy with your wedding cake, too.

Get your children involved. Too often, children aren’t involved in Jewish holiday preparation except Purim, which is a costume-clad holiday with similarities to Halloween. This year, have your children prepare parts of Rosh Hashanah. In the kitchen, they can cut the apples and pour the honey into little cups. Let them rip up a challah for honey-dipping. With supervision, they can braise the brisket.

And we can do the same every day of every year. We can write our own page in the Book of Life today, tomorrow, next week, next month, next year. How do we accomplish this? By reviewing our actions and goals from the last year, noticing where we fell short of achieving our desired outcomes and then setting new targets for the new year. However, we must take another step: We must write on the blank pages of the book by visualizing our new goals in fine detail and feeling exactly what it would be like if we had already manifested these results. In other words, we must imagine the life we want, the behaviors to which we aspire as if they had been published in that book – sealed, already done, accomplished.

September is also back to school time. If you’re planning on including children as flower girls or ring bearers, you should talk to their parents early to make sure they can make it to your wedding.

Park East has some very interesting Kosher food items like the Zomick’s Butter Cream Layer Cake for $14.98, Mini Broccoli Knish, package of 8 for $3.98 or Potato Pudding from Tray for $5.98 lb.

Planning A Successful Rosh Hashanah 2012

Planning A Successful Rosh Hashanah 2012

Yom Kippur (September 28, this year) is when Jewish people celebrate the Day of Atonement. Still in many parts of the world New Year’s Day falls on a day other then the first of January. The brisket will be served with red cabbage and potato kugel.
The New Year is a time to reflect upon the past, while looking forward to the future. It has been so since the early Romans, who dedicated the first day of the New Year to theirGod, Janus, keeper of the gate and the door.

Not the rest of the year. Attend Shabbat services or any minor holiday free of charge. That’s fine. But on those large important holidays – the two that make up what we know as the High Holy Days or High Holidays – you can only come in the doors of the sanctuary with a ticket.

Pepper some autumn flavors in your reception menu. A salad with roasted pumpkin seeds or a butternut squash soup can be a perfect start to an autumn meal. Entrees should be hot and hearty to keep your guests warm during the start of this chilly season. A coffee bar might be a nice touch to enjoy with your wedding cake, too.

Get your children involved. Too often, children aren’t involved in Jewish holiday preparation except Purim, which is a costume-clad holiday with similarities to Halloween. This year, have your children prepare parts of Rosh Hashanah. In the kitchen, they can cut the apples and pour the honey into little cups. Let them rip up a challah for honey-dipping. With supervision, they can braise the brisket.

And we can do the same every day of every year. We can write our own page in the Book of Life today, tomorrow, next week, next month, next year. How do we accomplish this? By reviewing our actions and goals from the last year, noticing where we fell short of achieving our desired outcomes and then setting new targets for the new year. However, we must take another step: We must write on the blank pages of the book by visualizing our new goals in fine detail and feeling exactly what it would be like if we had already manifested these results. In other words, we must imagine the life we want, the behaviors to which we aspire as if they had been published in that book – sealed, already done, accomplished.

September is also back to school time. If you’re planning on including children as flower girls or ring bearers, you should talk to their parents early to make sure they can make it to your wedding.

Park East has some very interesting Kosher food items like the Zomick’s Butter Cream Layer Cake for $14.98, Mini Broccoli Knish, package of 8 for $3.98 or Potato Pudding from Tray for $5.98 lb.

Yom Kippur (September 28, this year) is when Jewish people celebrate the Day of Atonement. Still in many parts of the world New Year’s Day falls on a day other then the first of January. The brisket will be served with red cabbage and potato kugel.
The New Year is a time to reflect upon the past, while looking forward to the future. It has been so since the early Romans, who dedicated the first day of the New Year to theirGod, Janus, keeper of the gate and the door.

Not the rest of the year. Attend Shabbat services or any minor holiday free of charge. That’s fine. But on those large important holidays – the two that make up what we know as the High Holy Days or High Holidays – you can only come in the doors of the sanctuary with a ticket.

Pepper some autumn flavors in your reception menu. A salad with roasted pumpkin seeds or a butternut squash soup can be a perfect start to an autumn meal. Entrees should be hot and hearty to keep your guests warm during the start of this chilly season. A coffee bar might be a nice touch to enjoy with your wedding cake, too.

Get your children involved. Too often, children aren’t involved in Jewish holiday preparation except Purim, which is a costume-clad holiday with similarities to Halloween. This year, have your children prepare parts of Rosh Hashanah. In the kitchen, they can cut the apples and pour the honey into little cups. Let them rip up a challah for honey-dipping. With supervision, they can braise the brisket.

And we can do the same every day of every year. We can write our own page in the Book of Life today, tomorrow, next week, next month, next year. How do we accomplish this? By reviewing our actions and goals from the last year, noticing where we fell short of achieving our desired outcomes and then setting new targets for the new year. However, we must take another step: We must write on the blank pages of the book by visualizing our new goals in fine detail and feeling exactly what it would be like if we had already manifested these results. In other words, we must imagine the life we want, the behaviors to which we aspire as if they had been published in that book – sealed, already done, accomplished.

September is also back to school time. If you’re planning on including children as flower girls or ring bearers, you should talk to their parents early to make sure they can make it to your wedding.

Park East has some very interesting Kosher food items like the Zomick’s Butter Cream Layer Cake for $14.98, Mini Broccoli Knish, package of 8 for $3.98 or Potato Pudding from Tray for $5.98 lb.