Ring In The Jewish New Year With A Gluten

Ring In The Jewish New Year With A Gluten

We helped out at a local soup kitchen during lunchtime. But strangely enough, in Iran and Iraq the tables are turned. So, its not surprising that during Rosh Hashanah honey is part of the culinary custom.

Now the interesting thing is that I always thought that I was alone in my dislike for honey cake, but when I got married, I was pleasantly surprised to find out that my wife also did not care for it. So our Rosh Hashanah cuisine always consisted of traditionally sweet foods but the cake of choice was not honey.

Like the New Year in January, this is the time when Jews call their relatives who live far away. To encourage this tradition, Temple Judea of Tarzana has devised a unique reminder. They have created a fun video using the music from Carly Rae Jepsen’s song “Call Me Maybe”. This video is called “Call Your Zeyde”.

At the bar, stock a couple of hearty red wines. You might also want to make your signature cocktail a warm drink – a hot apple cider perhaps? Or offer the apple cider as a chilled drink while the sun is still up and then offer a hot apple cider as an after dinner treat.

The terms shofar and shofars have been mentioned many a times in the Bible, in the Talmud and in the Torah. It is believed that during the Exodus, Moses blew the shofar from atop the Mount Sinai to gather all the Israelites. Since then the shofars have made their entry in the Jewish customs and traditions.

The apostle Paul said those holy days were “a shadow of things to come,” Colossian 2:16. He kept them, (Acts 20:6,16; 27:9) and urged us to follow his example, 1Cor 11:1; 5:8. Some scholars say the types that relate to the second advent will be fulfilled at the time of the symbolic service. This was so last fall when the US Senate met on Rosh Hashanah to approve a bailout and the markets crashed for 10 days till Yom Kippur. This fit the timing for the trumpets in Leviticus 23:24-27. With the first trumpet in Revelation 8:7, “all green grass was burnt up,” but grass represents riches in James 1:9-11 in KJV, “As the flower of the grass, so shall the rich man fade.” So we see a timely application of Jewish feast days may occur for the end-time, just as Christ died as the Passover lamb at Passover.

90% of Muslims are Sunnis and 10% are Shiites. Regardless of the numbers, this does leave room for discrimination. Islamic peoples are deeply rooted with their religion, for example: suicide bombers dying for their faith because they believe it will take them to Paradise. Sunnis view Shiites as heretics and in Saudi Arabia; Shiites are powerless and retain absolutely no rights. This creates a problem. Other Arab countries with Sunni majorities have followed suit.

We can strive to be better and better if we constantly experience the significance of the High Holy Days. That is what God requires and that is what our community desires. We can make a difference in our lives, our families and our community if we truly embrace the essence of the High Holy Days.

We helped out at a local soup kitchen during lunchtime. But strangely enough, in Iran and Iraq the tables are turned. So, its not surprising that during Rosh Hashanah honey is part of the culinary custom.

Now the interesting thing is that I always thought that I was alone in my dislike for honey cake, but when I got married, I was pleasantly surprised to find out that my wife also did not care for it. So our Rosh Hashanah cuisine always consisted of traditionally sweet foods but the cake of choice was not honey.

Like the New Year in January, this is the time when Jews call their relatives who live far away. To encourage this tradition, Temple Judea of Tarzana has devised a unique reminder. They have created a fun video using the music from Carly Rae Jepsen’s song “Call Me Maybe”. This video is called “Call Your Zeyde”.

At the bar, stock a couple of hearty red wines. You might also want to make your signature cocktail a warm drink – a hot apple cider perhaps? Or offer the apple cider as a chilled drink while the sun is still up and then offer a hot apple cider as an after dinner treat.

The terms shofar and shofars have been mentioned many a times in the Bible, in the Talmud and in the Torah. It is believed that during the Exodus, Moses blew the shofar from atop the Mount Sinai to gather all the Israelites. Since then the shofars have made their entry in the Jewish customs and traditions.

The apostle Paul said those holy days were “a shadow of things to come,” Colossian 2:16. He kept them, (Acts 20:6,16; 27:9) and urged us to follow his example, 1Cor 11:1; 5:8. Some scholars say the types that relate to the second advent will be fulfilled at the time of the symbolic service. This was so last fall when the US Senate met on Rosh Hashanah to approve a bailout and the markets crashed for 10 days till Yom Kippur. This fit the timing for the trumpets in Leviticus 23:24-27. With the first trumpet in Revelation 8:7, “all green grass was burnt up,” but grass represents riches in James 1:9-11 in KJV, “As the flower of the grass, so shall the rich man fade.” So we see a timely application of Jewish feast days may occur for the end-time, just as Christ died as the Passover lamb at Passover.

90% of Muslims are Sunnis and 10% are Shiites. Regardless of the numbers, this does leave room for discrimination. Islamic peoples are deeply rooted with their religion, for example: suicide bombers dying for their faith because they believe it will take them to Paradise. Sunnis view Shiites as heretics and in Saudi Arabia; Shiites are powerless and retain absolutely no rights. This creates a problem. Other Arab countries with Sunni majorities have followed suit.

We can strive to be better and better if we constantly experience the significance of the High Holy Days. That is what God requires and that is what our community desires. We can make a difference in our lives, our families and our community if we truly embrace the essence of the High Holy Days.