Rosh Hashanah: A Time For Renewal

Rosh Hashanah: A Time For Renewal

I hope all of you had a good Rosh Hashanah and are well on your way to making this year the best yet! As wedding costs continue to increase, more and more couples are planning casual, outdoor affairs.
Use the therapist’s secret. When you’re facing a battleaxe relative, win by refusing to fight. Accept comments about your appearance, weight or singlehood that used to upset you with a nod and say “That’s the way you see it.” This really throws them and saves you from a lot of holiday stress.

Mix in a bowl the flour, salt and 1 tablespoon of sugar. In a separate bowl whisk the eggs until frothy and add to the flour mixture plus the yeast mixture, boiling and cold water and oil and mix for about 5 minutes either by hand or with a mixer and dough hook. I mixed the dough until there were no lumps.

So now everyone can enjoy the sweet taste of honey cake on Rosh Hashanah and all year round. Here’s the recipe. We use whole whet flour and no one is the wiser.

While I do believe that God has a hand in our destiny, I also believe that we were given free choice about how – and possibly when – we create that destiny. In other words, I believe that the choices we make get us to that destiny. I also believe we are cocreators of our lives, the combination of our thoughts, feelings and actions manifesting the things we experience day to day. That said, we are all cocreating, and sometimes – maybe more often than we would like – our manifestations collide creating a fair amount of chaos. In any case, we constantly experience a combination of destiny or fate and conscious or subconscious creation and cocreation.

When the Romans invaded England, they found the Druids celebrating New Year’s Day on March 10. The pagan priest would cut off branches of mistletoe on this day and carefully allow them to fall onto a sacred blanket. The branches would then be distributed among the Celtic people to be used as magical charms and for protection against evil spirits.

The Jewish Calendar has twelve months, with Tishrei being the seventh month in the year. Your child can make their calendar using a standard month/calendar template with 35 squares. Using a traditional and Jewish calendar as guide, your child can mark the days of each month. Using stickers, markers and colored pencils, your child could add special occasions such as High Holy Days, the phases of the moon, other holidays, and birthdays to their calendar. In creating this useful and colorful Jewish calendar, your child will better understand days of the week, changes in seasons, and the dates of coming holidays.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?

I hope all of you had a good Rosh Hashanah and are well on your way to making this year the best yet! As wedding costs continue to increase, more and more couples are planning casual, outdoor affairs.
Use the therapist’s secret. When you’re facing a battleaxe relative, win by refusing to fight. Accept comments about your appearance, weight or singlehood that used to upset you with a nod and say “That’s the way you see it.” This really throws them and saves you from a lot of holiday stress.

Mix in a bowl the flour, salt and 1 tablespoon of sugar. In a separate bowl whisk the eggs until frothy and add to the flour mixture plus the yeast mixture, boiling and cold water and oil and mix for about 5 minutes either by hand or with a mixer and dough hook. I mixed the dough until there were no lumps.

So now everyone can enjoy the sweet taste of honey cake on Rosh Hashanah and all year round. Here’s the recipe. We use whole whet flour and no one is the wiser.

While I do believe that God has a hand in our destiny, I also believe that we were given free choice about how – and possibly when – we create that destiny. In other words, I believe that the choices we make get us to that destiny. I also believe we are cocreators of our lives, the combination of our thoughts, feelings and actions manifesting the things we experience day to day. That said, we are all cocreating, and sometimes – maybe more often than we would like – our manifestations collide creating a fair amount of chaos. In any case, we constantly experience a combination of destiny or fate and conscious or subconscious creation and cocreation.

When the Romans invaded England, they found the Druids celebrating New Year’s Day on March 10. The pagan priest would cut off branches of mistletoe on this day and carefully allow them to fall onto a sacred blanket. The branches would then be distributed among the Celtic people to be used as magical charms and for protection against evil spirits.

The Jewish Calendar has twelve months, with Tishrei being the seventh month in the year. Your child can make their calendar using a standard month/calendar template with 35 squares. Using a traditional and Jewish calendar as guide, your child can mark the days of each month. Using stickers, markers and colored pencils, your child could add special occasions such as High Holy Days, the phases of the moon, other holidays, and birthdays to their calendar. In creating this useful and colorful Jewish calendar, your child will better understand days of the week, changes in seasons, and the dates of coming holidays.

At this time of year I think about the stories I’ve heard about poor Jews brining in strangers to share their meager Shabbat dinner, only to discover that their guest was Elijah. The rabbis and administrators at temples say High Holy Day tickets are necessary because there just aren’t enough seats for everyone. What if Elijah was turned away from attending Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur services for lack of a ticket? What if allowing in that one person for free who wants to repent on Yom Kippur brought about the World to Come?