Rosh Hashanah And How To Celebrate The Jewish New Year

Rosh Hashanah And How To Celebrate The Jewish New Year

You can do this by making some of the delicious cuisine that is made during Rosh Hashanah. But the lacquer finish changes the sound of the shofar, again rendering it non-kosher. In his left hand he holds a scepter a symbol of power.
The Day of Atonement, the pinnacle of the High Holy Days, begins on the evening of September 17th and ends on the evening of the 18th. It is the culmination of the Ten Days of Awe.

Meditation: After the priest opens Mass this evening “in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit,” he will not say “the Mass is ended” until Saturday evening. Tonight begins the most important liturgy of the year, the Paschal Triduum, which in truth lasts for three days: Holy Thursday, Good Friday and finally the Easter Vigil on the evening of Holy Saturday. We depart in silence tonight, return and leave in sorrowful silence tomorrow and gather in silence once more – though with great expectation – as the sun departs on Saturday. The Passover of our Lord is here.

We “remember” our Lord the same way the Jews “remember” Passover. As we “proclaim the Lord’s death until He comes,” we are there in the Upper Room. We are there at the cross. And we invite the world to join us, if it will but hear the call. “Once for all” does not merely refer to “once for all time.” It also means “once for all people.” Come to the Table.

For this High Holy Day, pomegranates are a favorite. This fruit has symbolic significance to the Jewish people, because the fruit contains 613 seed, which mirrors the 613 commandments (mitzvoth) that Jewish people seek to follow. Also, many see the pomegranate’s seeds as representing abundance and a reminder of the people’s obedience during the prior year.

Curious, I kept asking about the tradition and he explained the dramatic ram’s horn is blown in synagogue and his family takes a walk from their home down to the creek at sunset to cast off their sins. I was close enough to my friend to ask him what the holiday means to him personally. He said something that was both emotional and mind blowing. He said that Rosh Hashanah gives him a chance to cleanse his soul. It makes him realize that even when we fail to obey G-d that hope springs eternal for a new day. He told me that no matter how much we feel separated from G-d, sunrise on a new day brings his love back to us.

The weekend of September 27th could bring creative intelligence from unexpected places. Mercury, well established in his retrograde direction, will be channeling Neptune. There is a very strong possibility of messages from past over loved ones this weekend. Any religious gatherings could become strong spiritual connections all the way through Rosh Hashanah, the last day of the month.

Does this seem backwards to anyone but me? Shouldn’t we be letting in the wandering Jews who want to pray on the High Holy Days – the ones who don’t come the rest of the year – in the hopes of getting them to come back on Shabbat? Shouldn’t we be helping them do t’shuvah, return to Judaism and to God?

Sound the shofar! It is more than just a ram’s horn! The shofar is both an important symbol of Jewish culture and an instrument that heralds significant festivals, covenants and beliefs of the Jewish people.

You can do this by making some of the delicious cuisine that is made during Rosh Hashanah. But the lacquer finish changes the sound of the shofar, again rendering it non-kosher. In his left hand he holds a scepter a symbol of power.
The Day of Atonement, the pinnacle of the High Holy Days, begins on the evening of September 17th and ends on the evening of the 18th. It is the culmination of the Ten Days of Awe.

Meditation: After the priest opens Mass this evening “in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit,” he will not say “the Mass is ended” until Saturday evening. Tonight begins the most important liturgy of the year, the Paschal Triduum, which in truth lasts for three days: Holy Thursday, Good Friday and finally the Easter Vigil on the evening of Holy Saturday. We depart in silence tonight, return and leave in sorrowful silence tomorrow and gather in silence once more – though with great expectation – as the sun departs on Saturday. The Passover of our Lord is here.

We “remember” our Lord the same way the Jews “remember” Passover. As we “proclaim the Lord’s death until He comes,” we are there in the Upper Room. We are there at the cross. And we invite the world to join us, if it will but hear the call. “Once for all” does not merely refer to “once for all time.” It also means “once for all people.” Come to the Table.

For this High Holy Day, pomegranates are a favorite. This fruit has symbolic significance to the Jewish people, because the fruit contains 613 seed, which mirrors the 613 commandments (mitzvoth) that Jewish people seek to follow. Also, many see the pomegranate’s seeds as representing abundance and a reminder of the people’s obedience during the prior year.

Curious, I kept asking about the tradition and he explained the dramatic ram’s horn is blown in synagogue and his family takes a walk from their home down to the creek at sunset to cast off their sins. I was close enough to my friend to ask him what the holiday means to him personally. He said something that was both emotional and mind blowing. He said that Rosh Hashanah gives him a chance to cleanse his soul. It makes him realize that even when we fail to obey G-d that hope springs eternal for a new day. He told me that no matter how much we feel separated from G-d, sunrise on a new day brings his love back to us.

The weekend of September 27th could bring creative intelligence from unexpected places. Mercury, well established in his retrograde direction, will be channeling Neptune. There is a very strong possibility of messages from past over loved ones this weekend. Any religious gatherings could become strong spiritual connections all the way through Rosh Hashanah, the last day of the month.

Does this seem backwards to anyone but me? Shouldn’t we be letting in the wandering Jews who want to pray on the High Holy Days – the ones who don’t come the rest of the year – in the hopes of getting them to come back on Shabbat? Shouldn’t we be helping them do t’shuvah, return to Judaism and to God?

Sound the shofar! It is more than just a ram’s horn! The shofar is both an important symbol of Jewish culture and an instrument that heralds significant festivals, covenants and beliefs of the Jewish people.